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23

Here are some scientific papers, with my brief summaries. Saunders MJ ; Hipp GR ; Wenos DL ; Deaton ML, "Trekking poles increase physiological responses to hiking without increased perceived exertion," J Strength Cond Res 2008 Sep; 22(5): 1468-74 Using trekking poles caused them to burn calories faster, as measured by VO2max. In other words, ...


17

I've heard rumors of studies that show that trekking poles reduce the force on your legs during a hike (by transferring it to your arms). The only reference to a study I could find was this one, but I wouldn't know how to verify that the study was well constructed. 2010 UK Study This showed about a 25% reduction in the strain on the leg muscles of hikers ...


10

The trekking pole should make a 90 degree angle with your elbow. This will be your reference setting that you might want change when: Going up a hill where you will reduce the length (helps you advance) Going down a hill where will increase the length (helps slow down or stabilize) For more information, I found this great image here


8

For USA to Canada flights, I have seen hiking poles being accepted (after a bit of explaining..) and refused (WestJet). If they are refused, you may be asked to go back to the luggage section which may end up making you or your poles miss the flight. In my experience it seems to vary on the carrier and the person performing the inspection. Because of these ...


8

Here are two pretty useful articles on the correct way to use poles: one shortish one and one longer quite comprehensive one. There are several aims in using a pole. Primarily (IMHO) is to reduce strain on the knees/ankles. Additionally they they provide extra stability on rough ground and can make going uphill easier. The disadvantage is they result in ...


7

There are people who swear by poles, and there are people hiking into their eighties without poles or knee trouble. Part of it is genetics, part of it is being intelligent about hiking. Poles may help with the symptoms, but wouldn't it be better not to cause the problems in the first place? If you're having knee problems, look at your pack weight. If your ...


6

I don't know of what quality are the poles which you are using, but it's a fact that the better the quality, the better the joints. It's one of the most important components of the price. For me, a good pair of poles from BlackDiamond behave pretty well under my 90 kg weight with a 30 kg backpack, which totals in 260 pound. This is a good side: yes, ...


5

Trekking poles are a great helper if you have problems with your knees after a long march. A pain 'in knees' is usually a pain in the muscles around the knees, that are responsible for maintaining equilibrium. Those muscles are not very active if you walk on footpath, but in outdoors they are intensively used. With trekking poles, the equilibrium is ...


5

I don't have any hard evidence other than personal experience, but using poles with shock absorption tends to be easier on the joints - it cushions, at least a little bit, the jolting on your body, especially when going down steep terrain. With a standard pole, when it connects with the ground, that's it - your downward motion is halted immediately. With the ...


5

Trekking poles can telescope down and pack away. If you happen to have a shelter that uses trekking poles to hold it up, sometimes you need to be able to set your poles to a different height. Some people also like to lengthen/shorten their poles depending on whether they are going down or up hill. If your shelter doesn't require them, I think the ...


5

Keep the inside of your poles clean. If they get soaked or sandy or muddy, clean them out after your trip and let them air dry. Clean the actual lock mechanism occasionally. Depending on the pole type, there may be a rubber cylinder that does the locking, clean it, and consider lightly abrading it with sand paper (not enough to remove any material, just ...


4

It is my understanding that the Nordic or Exercise Poles are for walking fast and the grip is designed to release quickly forward in stride with a glove like fit and usually have either a rubber or paw type tip. The Trekking or Hiking poles are designed for pushing slightly down on to take pressure off of your lower body with a lighter thinner strap and have ...


3

Based on where the pole is striking the ground, the surface hardness, and the extension of the poles you can get some vibrations and noise (I do). My guess is since the poles aren't extended all the way the shaft surfaces (where the extra length is hiding inside the pole) are colliding and causing that noise. You might be able to add a small o-ring to the ...


3

It does not necessarily reflect poorly made poles. If you have used the poles for a while without problems and you're just recently having problems, they likely need to be cleaned. I would start by checking to see if your poles have maintenance instructions specific to your model. You should always follow the manufacturers advice if possible. If they do not ...


2

Trekking poles are lighter and sometimes easier to break than ski poles. Some have the advantage of folding up into a short package. If you use trekking poles, you may want some with changeable baskets so you can put on some larger baskets that won't sink into the powder so easily.


2

I have used both and it isn't really a difference to me. I would even prefer the ski poles, because they have baskets at the bottom, so that they can't sink deep into the snow. Trekking poles usually don't have this feature. So I would chose ski poles. But there are also two advantages if you're using trekking poles: Usually these poles you can adjust the ...


1

Collapsible poles, compared to fixed poles Easier to fit in luggage. Easier to fit in the side pockets of backpacks when doing something that requires two hands, for example river crossing. Can be loaned to other people who are of different height to you.


1

Fixed length non-adjustable trekking poles have the advantages of being lighter, comprise of less failure points and sturdier (especially for cheap poles). On the other side of the medal, transporting them by airplane is more costly and they can be inconvenient when hitch hiking to/from a trailhead. I have used slightly longer fixed trekking poles in order ...


1

My personal experience is that I do not hike/backpack with out trekking poles. I find them very useful on inclines, declines, and even flat terrain. I long ago lost count in the number of times they have save me from a fall, especially while backpacking. I use the collapsible poles. The ease of storage is important to me. They also allow adjustment for ...


1

At UK airports you are not allowed to take them into the cabin. They must be in the hold. You wont get them through security and they confiscate them, whatever airline you are on.


1

I think it will be entirely random, depending on the airline, the airport and the individual security people who x-ray your bag. I've had climbing gear rejected and put into the hold one one trip, and then next time, accepted - same airport, same airline, just different day :)


1

I would wager that such a thing does not exist. Of the attachments you mention, only one (sharp spear) seems practical. Issues with the others: Camera mount: as rory-alsop mentions, it would make sense for the handle to have a camera mount, so you can stick the point into the snow / ground. This blogger has a few options (among which is a tip-mount). Raft ...



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