Hot answers tagged

9

There are a large range nice routes you could do. Generally, I would say the further North you go the wilder/more remote it will be. Although if you go really far North, the options for Munros does decrease somewhat. For specific routes, the "official" Scottish coast to coast goes from Oban to St. Andrews, and has some options for remote bits and Munros ...


8

Modern Day Adventurers Answers to What are essential items in an emergency kit? identify patterns/guidelines about what equipment and skills to have in backcountry. This is relevant as it covers the most basic necessities for survival and rescue in case of emergency. However, I imagine those intentionally venturing and living out in the wild with purpose ...


5

While I've never been to these cabins, I've been climbing and hiking in this area. In the map below I've outlined two route suggestions in purple, which you can vary as you please (and as you go). There's a rather dense network of trails, all marked trails are easy to follow. You'd start on the western side at point "1" at a public parking lot. You follow ...


5

In terms of self sufficiency in the wild there are two main approaches, the first is to take everything you need with you in as lightweight as form as possible the second is to avoid carrying consumables (food fuel etc) and focus more on the tools and knowledge required to obtain what you need from your environment. Clearly there is some crossover between ...


5

If you want to cross from west to east you could research the venerable TGO Challenge walk, where hundreds each May walk their own coast-to-coast route. If you Google "TGO Challenge" you'll find a large number of blogs discussing routes in detail. As others have said, for maximum Munro bagging, you'd probably want to cross the Nevis range and the ...


4

I've owned pairs of both Keen and Ecco sandals, and have been quite happy with both. They each have solid leather construction with comfortable padding on the inside, and they tend to hold up well. The sandals are cut so that water flows out of them quickly. The down side is that this allows gravel and sand into the sandals as well. If you're in the ...


4

I don't see why you couldn't. One key difference between ski poles and trekking poles is trekking poles often have a little shock absorber in them and ski poles never do. If you don't care about the shock absorber then you can use a whippet as is. If you want the shock absorbing properties of a trekking pole and the pick of a whippet then you might need to ...


4

One possibility is that Kielder Forest Park covers quite a lot of the Scotland England border. This should provide enough wilderness for wild camping and exploration off the beaten track but is also close enough to the well established Berwick to Gretna trail that you have the option of a more 'civilised' route for some sections if you want. A more ...


3

The Whippet is marketed as: ... the ultimate ski mountaineering tool ... that can help keep minor slips from turning into slides for life. For ski mountaineering, it is not feasible to carry an ice axe in your hands so the Whippet is better than nothing. Performing a self arrest with an ice axe is difficult and I would have serious doubts about the ...


2

Merrell make several excellent shoes which are designed to be lightweight running shoes and I believe they would fit your use case neatly. Unlike sandals they offer a fully enclosed toe for greater protection, with synthetic and mesh upper and drainage ports in the sole. They're often designed to be worn sockless and so fit the foot closely to minimise ...


2

Any kayaking shop will have a selection of both shoes and boots designed for this. While you can get them with thin soles, I recommend thicker soles if you're mainly wearing them on rocky river beds and banks. You'll get a range of weights and prices. Neoprene dive boots are also an option though they tend to be heavier. For a (possibly) cheap option, ...


1

I guess the answer really is It depends As a general purpose solution I normally bring sturdy trekking/hiking sandals on my trips. Something like the models from Teva for example (many pictures on Google). I specifically look for models with have sturdy rubber soles with good profiles, and which come with velcro straps that I can fasten/adjust quickly and ...


1

For the UK in spring where you expect river crossings there is an argument for just using boots which dry fast eg unlined fabric and leather construction as these also have the advantage of being more breathable in general. If that is not to your taste then the traditional canvas and rubber plimsoles are as good as anything for river crossings as the ...


1

In addition to personal equipment appropriate to the terrain and conditions there are some rescue specific basics which should be easy to provide: Shelter : this should be easy to erect around a casualty in any terrain so things like tarps and blankets are preferable to tents. Medical : even if you don't have proper medics, basics like field dressings ...


1

There are a couple of specific areas to look at : 1) Knowledge : you should make yourself aware of the basic skills that you need to travel safely in the wilderness. This includes things like basic survival skills and an understanding of the weather conditions and terrain that you will be travelling in. Before trips to an unfamiliar area you should also ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible