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24

The short answer is, "it depends". Packs sold to women may have only superficial changes compared to the men's version (i.e. the color is different), but there are usually a few common differences: Shorter torso length (distance from shoulder to hip, often shorter in women). Narrower shoulder straps (men tend to have broader shoulders). Shape of shoulder ...


11

Of course, there are many long-distance hiking trails without any available maps. As far as I'm aware, none of the European long-distance trails have dedicated end-to-end maps, unless you count Openstreetmap or a collection of several hundred topographic maps. In some places they're well-mapped, e.g. when passing through Switzerland, Germany, or France, ...


11

Yes, there are special places where you are allowed to sleep outside if you are climbing there. And by "outside" I mean without a tent, because these locations are (more or less) weatherproof by having roofs of rock. They usually have a a lot of sand on the ground which makes them quite comfortable. The local term of such a place is "boofe". They are a bit ...


9

There's always a difference between required and excessive. A lot of these multi tools have specific purposes. Do I require a screwdriver on a trek? Mostly no. Will I use a knife, a pair of scissors or even a pair of tweezers? Mostly Yes. So do I recommend carrying a multi tool to a trek? Yes. But having said that, there are multitude of these tools out ...


9

Modern Day Adventurers Answers to What are essential items in an emergency kit? identify patterns/guidelines about what equipment and skills to have in backcountry. This is relevant as it covers the most basic necessities for survival and rescue in case of emergency. However, I imagine those intentionally venturing and living out in the wild with purpose ...


9

There are a large range nice routes you could do. Generally, I would say the further North you go the wilder/more remote it will be. Although if you go really far North, the options for Munros does decrease somewhat. For specific routes, the "official" Scottish coast to coast goes from Oban to St. Andrews, and has some options for remote bits and Munros ...


9

about excess rope, rope length and how to split rope please see: http://outdoors.stackexchange.com/a/7025/2653 As you see on the picture, the two ends of the rope is devided evenly between the first and the last rope team member. If you don't know this, I guess you don't know how to rescue someone in case of crevasse fall. You should really learn it by ...


8

I love bananas and can eat a half-dozen to a dozen a day while at home. While out on the trail I try to have one or two a day. I also enjoy taking with me peaches, grapes, prunes (very good for you on-trail) and such, like yourself. What I have always done is keep them in the middle part of my backpack. Above anything heavy that can squish them (food bag) ...


8

This isn't really a clear yes/no sort of question, I'm also pretty reticent to tell someone what would be best for their child. Aside from that hopefully someone will provide some information that will make your decision or others thinking of doing the same easier. My first suggestion would be to work out which huts you are thinking of staying at or around ...


8

According to German law, bivouacking (defined as sleeping outside for one night without a tent) is generally allowed in Germany, but only outside from nature protection areas. Camping is generally forbidden outside of designated campsites. As you mention, large parts of the Elbe Sandstone Mountains are under statutory protection within Saxon Switzerland ...


7

I often heard this method is reliable and I am also using it. From experience I can say it works. Also if you search the web you will find articles like for example this and this. Also available are color charts to get an visual impression, see e.g.: Besides that personally I know that I am not prone to get headache. So when I start getting slight ...


7

The question has the tag "mountaineering," but most of the time when I hear people say that you need boots with ankle support, they're actually talking about trail-walking. The cases of hiking and mountaineering are qualitatively different. For mountaineering, one big reason people usually don't use lightweight running shoes is that often there is talus, ...


7

I do a lot of strength training when not backpacking, and try to keep my protein up around ~140 grams per day, on average. I asked a related question over on the fitness.stackexchange.com site, and at this point make all my own meals (usually with my dehydrator) because I find pre-made-hiker-food to be junk. The lightest protein source I know of is simply ...


7

I would lash it to the side of the pack, vertically, with nylon straps that you can purchase at any outdoor sporting store. You may have a little bit of trouble walking beneath branches or fallen trees if it extends too high above you. You should also remember that a bow is considered hunting equipment and, depending on the state you are in, you can be in ...


7

As already stated several times: If you know what you need to do on a glacier, you know what material to take. The other way round does not work: Just having the necessary gear will not insure proper crevasse rescue. So your first step is to take a course or find someone experienced to show you. This is the only recommended way to do it, but that is of ...


6

Yes, for Har-ki-doon trek you need a local forest permit. Hiring a guide is not a mandatory thing, but recommended. The guide will take care of campsites and arranging food at a fair bargain. First things first. You can book a cab from Dehradun to Sankri villege. On the way you would pass through a place called Naitwar (Tagged Netwar on google maps). The ...


6

First of all: try to think and plan ahead. Don't get caught on a mountain top during a thunder storm... Keep an eye on the weather and change your route accordingly. Location: Make sure you're not exposed and not the highest point in the immediate vicinity. So stay off of summits, hills, and don't stand upright in the middle of a vast field. Ideal: ...


6

I don't understand why you're so centric around protein. There are protein bars, some of which contain over 20g of protein. There are also freeze dried meats which is actually more protein dense(higher protien-weight ratio) than protein bars. Freeze dried foods generally offer the best weight to calorie ratio, because they have almost no water weight. Even ...


6

The Kungsleden (lit. kings way in Swedish) is a 440 km long trail in northern Sweden/Scandinavia. From Wiki: The trail is separated in four portions which each represent approximately one week of hiking. The most practiced part is by far the northernmost, between Abisko and Kebnekaise. The season, when the huts are open usually runs between ...


6

It all comes down to fit. Try it on as you would any pack. If it spreads weight the way it should... go for it!


5

One trick not yet mentioned, but surprisingly efficient: When I start sweating in this area (and I'm out in the woods where I won't meet a lot of people) I usually just open the zipper on my pants. This helps wonders to boost air circulation, thus preventing sweating. For me this also 100% prevents the hiking rashes. Sometimes I walk for an hour like that, ...


5

(NB: I would have added this as a comment to @fgysin's answer, but I don't have enough rep. to comment yet.) @fgysin's answer (and the associated comments) is very thorough, and covers most points. However, there's one other thing worth considering (unless you're alone). If you haven't been able to get to a safe location, and are sitting out the storm as ...


5

Q: Would it work? A: Probably, tobacco is toxic to Leeches, but the problem with rubbing cigarette tobacco all over your legs is you will also absorb all of the manufactured additives and toxins put into the cigarette tobacco. You'd be better off using chewing tobacco. Tobacco accelerates coagulation and was used for its medicinal properties in the past. ...


5

In southern Germany there are a lot of steep hills which don't have too much rock but mainly grass. Therefore people are "grass climbing" mountains, there is even a grass climbing grade for it. You use an ice axe and crampons just as you do on ice. The colder it gets, the more rigid the solid is. Best is ice (frozen ground) because it gives you more ...


5

Try starting a discussion on the couchsurfing page of the given Swedish region saying that you would like to do this or that type of trekking, for given period and difficulty, preferably include what gear would be needed; this way locals and nearby travelers may contact and join you, but beware: there is no warranty that the potential trekking partners would ...


5

First of all, trekking poles will change the way you hike forever. They are a luxury that saves your legs a lot of exertion, sparing you a lot of energy, allowing you to enjoy yourself that much more. Trekking Poles have a lot of features that XC pole lack. Many Trekking Poles have shock absorbers in them which dampen the load to your wrists when they ...


5

In terms of self sufficiency in the wild there are two main approaches, the first is to take everything you need with you in as lightweight as form as possible the second is to avoid carrying consumables (food fuel etc) and focus more on the tools and knowledge required to obtain what you need from your environment. Clearly there is some crossover between ...


5

While I've never been to these cabins, I've been climbing and hiking in this area. In the map below I've outlined two route suggestions in purple, which you can vary as you please (and as you go). There's a rather dense network of trails, all marked trails are easy to follow. You'd start on the western side at point "1" at a public parking lot. You follow ...


5

If you want to cross from west to east you could research the venerable TGO Challenge walk, where hundreds each May walk their own coast-to-coast route. If you Google "TGO Challenge" you'll find a large number of blogs discussing routes in detail. As others have said, for maximum Munro bagging, you'd probably want to cross the Nevis range and the ...


5

I've owned pairs of both Keen and Ecco sandals, and have been quite happy with both. They each have solid leather construction with comfortable padding on the inside, and they tend to hold up well. The sandals are cut so that water flows out of them quickly. The down side is that this allows gravel and sand into the sandals as well. If you're in the ...



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