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13

Hooray! Welcome to the wonderful world of backpacking! This post is LONG, so I've made a summary list to get you started, and what follows below is a probably way too comprehensive explanation of the items. Sorry for the tl;dr! Summary: Backpack (with detachable day pack or separate, if needed) Tent (or hammock, bivy, etc.) Stakes and guylines Tarp/tent ...


7

Blisters are caused by friction. Your skin is not very slippery. Applying moleskin and duct-tape over a "hot-spot" adds a protective layer between your skin and shoe. Thus as your shoe slides, it rubs against the tape or mole-skin instead of your skin. Pointers: Use enough tape/mole-skin to cover an area larger than the hot-spot. If the hotspot is on the ...


6

There is hardly anything very effective first aid as such, considering the fact that you are 5 hrs walk from any medical facility. I guess I can assume that you will be roaming in rain forests of Agumbe or anywhere in Southern Western Ghats since you referred to King Cobras. Considering the region where you refer, There are two types of venomous snakes ...


6

As already said in WedaPashi's answer, the question in my personal experience is not so much about fast and slow. It is mainly about finding your own rhythm and walking speed that you can then sustain for long times. Whenever I go too fast, I come to a state where I have to take a rest, after some minutes I feel like "Oh, I'm fine again", start to walk ...


6

I would say there is no point in walking briskly. With a heavy backpack, it's a no-no for me. I have observed and have struggled with the same problem when I started off towards some serious trekking with genuinely elevated/steep climbs with a heavy haversack on my back. The sack that I usually carry weighs about 18 kg. People who are advising you to walk ...


6

I've been to Mongolia many years ago (2001), so I'm not sure that my answer can help you much. I was there for almost two month, did some treks without a guide and also horse-riding and motor-cycles journey with a local guide. Mongolia is a huge country, mostly a high plateau with moderate hills/mountains. When I was there and I guess that it didn't changed ...


5

This is actually very simple. You use them as both a cushioning material and a way to prevent your shoe rubbing on your skin. If you have a problem area, products such as Compeed cushions, mole skin etc work really well, but in an emergency duct tape should work just fine. Just stick them over the area, making sure the edges don't catch on anything in ...


5

Haba Xueshan (Haba Snow Mountain 哈巴雪山) is a commonly summited peak here in Yunnan, China, at the eastern extent of the Himalaya. It's not as high altitude ("only" 5396 m) but it has high prominence (1794 m), and is situated picturesquely above Tiger Leaping Gorge. I understand that people summit without a lot of expertise, but it requires overnighting and a ...


5

The quick answer to a question of credible sources for solo trekking trails is, "NO", there are no sources which can be completely relied on for this kind of information (at least for the western ghats part). The following set of attributes might help you in deciding upon heading out solo in the western ghats: Safety: The western ghats are safe for ...


5

This answer address efficiency i.e. to climb quickly, without getting too tired. It is something in between an answer and a comment. One advantage of walking consistently is thermal balance. That's how some old people in my area hike for several hours in the snow, wearing only shoes and short pants. And by thermal balance I mean avoiding the vicious cycle ...


4

Safety is fine, so long as you are prepared and can read a map adequately. The UK has something called the "Countryside code". This is not a legal requirement but a blueprint about how to behave in the wild in the UK. Full information is available from the ramblers association. Some of the more important points here: Respect the needs of local people ...


4

I don't have any hard evidence other than personal experience, but using poles with shock absorption tends to be easier on the joints - it cushions, at least a little bit, the jolting on your body, especially when going down steep terrain. With a standard pole, when it connects with the ground, that's it - your downward motion is halted immediately. With the ...


4

It might be both an obvious choice and not a "real" mountain, but what about Kala Pathar, the "black rock"? It's a 5545 meter hill facing Mt. Everest, and is the final destination of the Everest Base Camp Trek. Despite appearing unimpressive from Gorak Shep (the last and highest tea house in the area), it's still a harrowing hour or two to get to the top. ...


4

A hat. Or a cap with a sun shield. It covers the back part of your neck and ears from harmful sun rays. Also, make sure that the cap is UV protective. A simple hat might not do the trick of blocking out the UV (It might protect you from direct sun though). One disadvantage of a hat is that it blocks your peripheral view (i.e if the hat droops on the ...


3

So, like I said, I'm not a great expert on using duct tape and moleskin. I'm writing an answer because someone specifically asked. :) My experiences: First off - applying duct tape or moleskin to your feet is a skill you develop through trial and error. Make sure that you learn to do it BEFORE going on a major expedition. Whenever I have a big hiking ...


3

In Nepal there is Thorong La which is a high altitude pass in the Annapurna that is doable without, in my opinion, much experience. It is fairly popular trek and you will likely encounter organized groups even during the off season. There are accessible trekking routes with accommodations and progressive acclimatization. You will need to acquire permits and ...


3

To get the hygiene part out of the way, everybody needs to bring or have access to good (alcohol based) hand sanitizer at all times. For deciding on the size of cooking groups: how large is your cooking pot? At scouting we either set up a base camp where we'll cook for the entire group (25 persons) or when hiking we use smaller gear and would split up in ...


3

I assume by hat you mean mean a full-brim hat, while by cap you are referring to a baseball cap (brim in front only)? Regardeless, in all instances of hiking anywhere with intense sun, your best bet will be: a hat The wider the brim the better, to keep the sun off your neck, ears, nose and shoulders. For sunny, arid regions: consider a thin airy ...


3

It is very safe to walk alone in England. The standard walks will have lots of others walking along them. Wild camping is frowned upon in many places. Procedures: leaving gates as you find them. Carrying your rubbish to a dustbin. Look in the right direction when crossing a road. On roads, walk facing the traffic. In the countryside you should say "Hello" ...


3

If there's a solid chance you're going to encounter snow or heavy wind during the trek ( and I'm guessing there is with those elevations ) or the future treks you plan to use the tent with, it's unlikely that a 3 season tent is going to be enough for you. 3 season is a category meant for tents that aren't intended to stand up to wind and snow. Though, if ...


2

Great answer from QuentinUK. I would add that you should be aware that although you do have access rights on footpaths, many of them go through private land. Some land owners maintain routes and signs better than others, but if they have made the effort follow the path as best you can. Sometimes these routes are for getting you across safely (especially ...


2

Backpackers all end up evolving their own styles. Personally, I prefer an ultralight style for summer. Some things that differ in this style from the heavier style most people practice: a frameless pack such as a Gossamer Gear G4 very small, lightweight sleeping pad such as the one that comes with the G4 a tarp rather than a tent (I get mine from Oware, ...


2

Check out - http://www.outdoorgearlab.com/ As an avid hiker, this website is my bible. It has fantastic gear reviews and comparison tables (lightest tents, best warmth-cost ratio sleeping bags etc). I always go for as light as possible, because it makes the trip much more enjoyable and safer (you're not overly tempted to ditch your pack for a side trip). ...


2

I climbed the Stok Kangri some years ago. I went to Langtang (Nepal) last March/April. The Tsermo Ri is at an altitude of around 4900m (if I remember correctly). It can be walked up easily without special equipment from Kyanjing Gompa. It is a day trip from the Kyanjing Gompa village. The summit might not be as high as the Stok Kangri but the view is really ...


2

Another issue to think about is whether you will have a backpack or not (and how high it rides up). Anyone who's tried backpacking with a sombrero knows what I mean - the hat is constantly whacking the pack and it drives you nuts. Also consider (as mentioned above) the wind - a string through the hat that can be tightened around the chin works, as does a ...


1

Another option is a cap/visor with a bandanna. I like doing this when I expect windy conditions. Wide brimmed hats (superior in most other circumstances) will have more wind resistance and can become quite the nuisance. When you can wear neither a hat nor a cap (because you are wearing a helmet, for example,) the bandanna alone is quite effective!


1

In my experience, you need to calibrate each guidebook or website to your own experience. As a case study, I can speak from experience with two guidebooks describing hikes and treks in the same region: På Fjälltur: Abisko Kebnekaise, describes lots of trails in the area around Nikkaluokta and Abisko. They grade trails at a scale of 1–10. I've found ...


1

Well established treks like the Annapurna circuit are rated by multiple trekking agencies. I would use those agencies rating as a reference point to differentiate between multiple well-established treks. For example you can compare the difficulty of different treks in Nepal according to Himalayan Glacier.


1

There are few peaks like : Ekdant - 6128 mtrs (A name for Lord Ganesh), Kartik - 5113 mtrs(named after brother of Lord Ganesh). I had planned for these two on a single trip, though I cudnt bid for summit due to bad weather. There is Parvati Parbat (6,257m) above the Satopanth Glacier. I have the Himalayan Journal of year 2009 which has expedition reports ...


1

If the passes are horizontal only, you might tie the bikes to the steel ropes and just push and/or pull them. If it's a more or less vertical climb, I wouldn't do it with a bike. In any case I wouldn't tie the bike to myself nor would I carry it on my shoulder. I would make sure my safety comes first. In case of a slip or in case of a fall I would make ...



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