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14

Hooray! Welcome to the wonderful world of backpacking! This post is LONG, so I've made a summary list to get you started, and what follows below is a probably way too comprehensive explanation of the items. Sorry for the tl;dr! Summary: Backpack (with detachable day pack or separate, if needed) Tent (or hammock, bivy, etc.) Stakes and guylines Tarp/tent ...


12

There is hardly anything very effective first aid as such, considering the fact that you are 5 hrs walk from any medical facility. I guess I can assume that you will be roaming in rain forests of Agumbe or anywhere in Southern Western Ghats since you referred to King Cobras. Considering the region where you refer, There are two types of venomous snakes ...


10

I think there are several factors to consider when traveling alone. Pros You can set your own pace. For me this is one of the main reasons to hike alone. When with other people they often want to go faster than you and you end up breaking yourself trying to keep up or are slower/less confidant and you have to slow down/not do those 'interesting' scrambles ...


9

My experience of mountain huts huts is mainly from UK and Europe. Standards in other parts of the world may vary. Mountain huts come in a wide range of different varieties. At the basic end you have unmanned huts or bothies. These can range from very basic with just a roof and wooden bunks to put your sleeping kit on to reasonably nice with beds, stove, ...


8

I would say there is no point in walking briskly. With a heavy backpack, it's a no-no for me. I have observed and have struggled with the same problem when I started off towards some serious trekking with genuinely elevated/steep climbs with a heavy haversack on my back. The sack that I usually carry weighs about 18 kg. People who are advising you to walk ...


7

Cooking as a large group is bad for a variety of reasons: More work to coordinate roles, responsibilities. Limited cooking resources (stoves, pots, etc.) means waiting, frustration, idleness, or carrying more than one of everything. More likely to waste fuel. Waste of energy/misuse of downtime e.g. Instead of cooking every 3rd day/meal you're cooking every ...


7

Consider whether you really need to have dry shoes before going thru all the trouble. In the winter, wet footwear can be a serious problem. However, when it's warm out there is really no danger from wet shoes. The only issue may be that you simply don't like the feel of it. In situations where its warm enough and there is no real danger from wet shoes, ...


7

To be honest, the most important thing a Rescue Team needs to have is plenty of manpower (and womanpower!) with training and experience (speaking as a member of a UK Cave Rescue Team).


6

Haba Xueshan (Haba Snow Mountain 哈巴雪山) is a commonly summited peak here in Yunnan, China, at the eastern extent of the Himalaya. It's not as high altitude ("only" 5396 m) but it has high prominence (1794 m), and is situated picturesquely above Tiger Leaping Gorge. I understand that people summit without a lot of expertise, but it requires overnighting and a ...


6

I've been to Mongolia many years ago (2001), so I'm not sure that my answer can help you much. I was there for almost two month, did some treks without a guide and also horse-riding and motor-cycles journey with a local guide. Mongolia is a huge country, mostly a high plateau with moderate hills/mountains. When I was there and I guess that it didn't changed ...


6

As already said in WedaPashi's answer, the question in my personal experience is not so much about fast and slow. It is mainly about finding your own rhythm and walking speed that you can then sustain for long times. Whenever I go too fast, I come to a state where I have to take a rest, after some minutes I feel like "Oh, I'm fine again", start to walk ...


6

Safety is fine, so long as you are prepared and can read a map adequately. The UK has something called the "Countryside code". This is not a legal requirement but a blueprint about how to behave in the wild in the UK. Full information is available from the ramblers association. Some of the more important points here: Respect the needs of local people ...


5

This answer address efficiency i.e. to climb quickly, without getting too tired. It is something in between an answer and a comment. One advantage of walking consistently is thermal balance. That's how some old people in my area hike for several hours in the snow, wearing only shoes and short pants. And by thermal balance I mean avoiding the vicious cycle ...


5

To get the hygiene part out of the way, everybody needs to bring or have access to good (alcohol based) hand sanitizer at all times. For deciding on the size of cooking groups: how large is your cooking pot? At scouting we either set up a base camp where we'll cook for the entire group (25 persons) or when hiking we use smaller gear and would split up in ...


5

The quick answer to a question of credible sources for solo trekking trails is, "NO", there are no sources which can be completely relied on for this kind of information (at least for the western ghats part). The following set of attributes might help you in deciding upon heading out solo in the western ghats: Safety: The western ghats are safe for ...


5

There isn't a problem carrying fuel for camping stoves (assuming in "sensible" quanities) in the UK. HOWEVER, when wild camping (i.e camping off of organised camp sites) in the UK, the ethos is to leave no trace afterwards. So setting camp fires is a no-no. And on many organised camp sites, open fires are forbidden (although some do allow small fires and ...


5

Depends on what you are going for. If you are heading this up, expect it to be a full-time endeavor for at least a year, and then part time for the lifetime of the hut. Like Nivag said, there are lots of different types of huts, so you have to decide on what you want before anything else. This will depend a lot on how much work you want to put into it, the ...


5

Below is the bare minimum list of gear I would require anyone on my team to carry during and rescue operation. It does not include any of the numerous pieces of rope equipment that members of the rope team would cary in addition to the basic equipment ( only specific team members that have completed extensive training are qualified to be involved in any of ...


5

My personal opinion is you may be being a little bit optimistic on your speed. I would probably aim for 20-30km per day (~15 miles) if you have not done such a long trip before and are reasonably fit. Although there are several factors to consider: Hiking with a 40lb pack is significantly different and more tiring than hiking with just a day pack, ...


5

Iztaccihuatl would use about the same skills as Aconcagua, but is lower altitude and can be done in a day, rather than the 2 weeks usually required for Aconcagua. I acclimatized by spending several days hiking on La Malinche. If you're interested in Aconcagua and don't have a lot of high-altitude/snow experience, you might want to do Izta as a warmup. Point ...


4

A hat. Or a cap with a sun shield. It covers the back part of your neck and ears from harmful sun rays. Also, make sure that the cap is UV protective. A simple hat might not do the trick of blocking out the UV (It might protect you from direct sun though). One disadvantage of a hat is that it blocks your peripheral view (i.e if the hat droops on the ...


4

It might be both an obvious choice and not a "real" mountain, but what about Kala Pathar, the "black rock"? It's a 5545 meter hill facing Mt. Everest, and is the final destination of the Everest Base Camp Trek. Despite appearing unimpressive from Gorak Shep (the last and highest tea house in the area), it's still a harrowing hour or two to get to the top. ...


4

I don't have any hard evidence other than personal experience, but using poles with shock absorption tends to be easier on the joints - it cushions, at least a little bit, the jolting on your body, especially when going down steep terrain. With a standard pole, when it connects with the ground, that's it - your downward motion is halted immediately. With the ...


4

If there's a solid chance you're going to encounter snow or heavy wind during the trek ( and I'm guessing there is with those elevations ) or the future treks you plan to use the tent with, it's unlikely that a 3 season tent is going to be enough for you. 3 season is a category meant for tents that aren't intended to stand up to wind and snow. Though, if ...


3

Here are some ideas: Bring spare river crossing footwear Use hiking sandals (e.g. chacos) as your main footwear Use quick drying shoes instead of big boots Use a small towel to remove excess water by pressing on it against the sole of your shoe (repeat until no water can be drawn) Bring a spare pair of socks (wool is often prefered) to keep your feet dry; ...


3

It is very safe to walk alone in England. The standard walks will have lots of others walking along them. Wild camping is frowned upon in many places. Procedures: leaving gates as you find them. Carrying your rubbish to a dustbin. Look in the right direction when crossing a road. On roads, walk facing the traffic. In the countryside you should say "Hello" ...


3

I assume by hat you mean mean a full-brim hat, while by cap you are referring to a baseball cap (brim in front only)? Regardeless, in all instances of hiking anywhere with intense sun, your best bet will be: a hat The wider the brim the better, to keep the sun off your neck, ears, nose and shoulders. For sunny, arid regions: consider a thin airy ...


3

I am not familiar with the reptiles around the world. I can however, share the results of my (informal) research (read: googling) of several years ago. I did that, because I was going alone in the summer forest several hours from help at any time. I discovered a viper incident report, among the many forum statements that snakes in Bulgaria are not deadly. ...


3

In Nepal there is Thorong La which is a high altitude pass in the Annapurna that is doable without, in my opinion, much experience. It is fairly popular trek and you will likely encounter organized groups even during the off season. There are accessible trekking routes with accommodations and progressive acclimatization. You will need to acquire permits and ...


3

Making 30-35 km every day is perfectly sound, if only you're used to making such distance. The famous Polish hiker, Łukasz Supergan have written to made 30 km a day on average on his 4000 km long trip to Santiago de Compostella. The trained hiker can made 30-50 km a day without days off. This is confirmed in the memories of wandering workers, partisants, ...



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