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11

Pressing on your knees will relieve some of the stress on your muscles, giving you additional endurance on a climb, but it puts unnatural stress on the joint. Without going too deep into the specifics of the anatomy, you have four muscles in your "quad" that attach to your patella, which is attached to your tibia (shin) via the patellar tendon. It is ...


11

Of course, there are many long-distance hiking trails without any available maps. As far as I'm aware, none of the European long-distance trails have dedicated end-to-end maps, unless you count Openstreetmap or a collection of several hundred topographic maps. In some places they're well-mapped, e.g. when passing through Switzerland, Germany, or France, ...


11

Yes, there are special places where you are allowed to sleep outside if you are climbing there. And by "outside" I mean without a tent, because these locations are (more or less) weatherproof by having roofs of rock. They usually have a a lot of sand on the ground which makes them quite comfortable. The local term of such a place is "boofe". They are a bit ...


9

There's always a difference between required and excessive. A lot of these multi tools have specific purposes. Do I require a screwdriver on a trek? Mostly no. Will I use a knife, a pair of scissors or even a pair of tweezers? Mostly Yes. So do I recommend carrying a multi tool to a trek? Yes. But having said that, there are multitude of these tools out ...


8

I love bananas and can eat a half-dozen to a dozen a day while at home. While out on the trail I try to have one or two a day. I also enjoy taking with me peaches, grapes, prunes (very good for you on-trail) and such, like yourself. What I have always done is keep them in the middle part of my backpack. Above anything heavy that can squish them (food bag) ...


8

This isn't really a clear yes/no sort of question, I'm also pretty reticent to tell someone what would be best for their child. Aside from that hopefully someone will provide some information that will make your decision or others thinking of doing the same easier. My first suggestion would be to work out which huts you are thinking of staying at or around ...


8

According to German law, bivouacking (defined as sleeping outside for one night without a tent) is generally allowed in Germany, but only outside from nature protection areas. Camping is generally forbidden outside of designated campsites. As you mention, large parts of the Elbe Sandstone Mountains are under statutory protection within Saxon Switzerland ...


7

I often heard this method is reliable and I am also using it. From experience I can say it works. Also if you search the web you will find articles like for example this and this. Also available are color charts to get an visual impression, see e.g.: Besides that personally I know that I am not prone to get headache. So when I start getting slight ...


7

I do a lot of strength training when not backpacking, and try to keep my protein up around ~140 grams per day, on average. I asked a related question over on the fitness.stackexchange.com site, and at this point make all my own meals (usually with my dehydrator) because I find pre-made-hiker-food to be junk. The lightest protein source I know of is simply ...


7

I would lash it to the side of the pack, vertically, with nylon straps that you can purchase at any outdoor sporting store. You may have a little bit of trouble walking beneath branches or fallen trees if it extends too high above you. You should also remember that a bow is considered hunting equipment and, depending on the state you are in, you can be in ...


6

Yes, for Har-ki-doon trek you need a local forest permit. Hiring a guide is not a mandatory thing, but recommended. The guide will take care of campsites and arranging food at a fair bargain. First things first. You can book a cab from Dehradun to Sankri villege. On the way you would pass through a place called Naitwar (Tagged Netwar on google maps). The ...


6

The question has the tag "mountaineering," but most of the time when I hear people say that you need boots with ankle support, they're actually talking about trail-walking. The cases of hiking and mountaineering are qualitatively different. For mountaineering, one big reason people usually don't use lightweight running shoes is that often there is talus, ...


6

I don't understand why you're so centric around protein. There are protein bars, some of which contain over 20g of protein. There are also freeze dried meats which is actually more protein dense(higher protien-weight ratio) than protein bars. Freeze dried foods generally offer the best weight to calorie ratio, because they have almost no water weight. Even ...


6

Disclaimer: I rarely use GPS system personally so feel free to correct me if I've misunderstood something. However, I think that 2000 points should be more than enough. Say you are doing a reasonably long route of 40km per day. If you use all 2000 points in that distance that will give you one point every 20m. Give that the accuracy of your GPS under some ...


6

The main advantage of anti-shock poles is that they tend to be less jolting on joints (like elbows and wrists) when used on firm ground or rocky terrain. On softer ground, where the dirt, sand or snow provides natural impact absorption, they can sometimes feel "mushy", and most people would find the benefits negligible. For this reason (and also to prevent ...


6

The Kungsleden (lit. kings way in Swedish) is a 440 km long trail in northern Sweden/Scandinavia. From Wiki: The trail is separated in four portions which each represent approximately one week of hiking. The most practiced part is by far the northernmost, between Abisko and Kebnekaise. The season, when the huts are open usually runs between ...


5

One trick not yet mentioned, but surprisingly efficient: When I start sweating in this area (and I'm out in the woods where I won't meet a lot of people) I usually just open the zipper on my pants. This helps wonders to boost air circulation, thus preventing sweating. For me this also 100% prevents the hiking rashes. Sometimes I walk for an hour like that, ...


5

Carrying perishable foods is not practical, but it is doable. The only way to do it though is to keep your food cooled, and the easiest way to do that, when it's hot out, is to carry a cooler, which I have definitely gone backpacking with before: There are such things as solar powered coolers, which can keep your food cool without the necessity of ...


5

Q: Would it work? A: Probably, tobacco is toxic to Leeches, but the problem with rubbing cigarette tobacco all over your legs is you will also absorb all of the manufactured additives and toxins put into the cigarette tobacco. You'd be better off using chewing tobacco. Tobacco accelerates coagulation and was used for its medicinal properties in the past. ...


5

First of all: try to think and plan ahead. Don't get caught on a mountain top during a thunder storm... Keep an eye on the weather and change your route accordingly. Location: Make sure you're not exposed and not the highest point in the immediate vicinity. So stay off of summits, hills, and don't stand upright in the middle of a vast field. Ideal: ...


5

(NB: I would have added this as a comment to @fgysin's answer, but I don't have enough rep. to comment yet.) @fgysin's answer (and the associated comments) is very thorough, and covers most points. However, there's one other thing worth considering (unless you're alone). If you haven't been able to get to a safe location, and are sitting out the storm as ...


5

In southern Germany there are a lot of steep hills which don't have too much rock but mainly grass. Therefore people are "grass climbing" mountains, there is even a grass climbing grade for it. You use an ice axe and crampons just as you do on ice. The colder it gets, the more rigid the solid is. Best is ice (frozen ground) because it gives you more ...


5

Try starting a discussion on the couchsurfing page of the given Swedish region saying that you would like to do this or that type of trekking, for given period and difficulty, preferably include what gear would be needed; this way locals and nearby travelers may contact and join you, but beware: there is no warranty that the potential trekking partners would ...


5

First of all, trekking poles will change the way you hike forever. They are a luxury that saves your legs a lot of exertion, sparing you a lot of energy, allowing you to enjoy yourself that much more. Trekking Poles have a lot of features that XC pole lack. Many Trekking Poles have shock absorbers in them which dampen the load to your wrists when they ...


4

I carry a compact Victorinox Swiss Army Knife (Huntsman) which I find perfectly adequate for all of the situations I have encountered in the wilderness. If you consider that too heavy to carry (3.5 inches and 28grams) then you need to reevaluate your fitness (joke!) and what kind of trade-offs you are making between weight and functionality. As an ...


4

There are several options Goggles that fit over you prescription glasses (Commonly referred to as "Over the glasses" or just 'OTG'.) - probably the cheapest solution, used successfully by many people. Contact lenses are available for all sorts of prescriptions now days and could be worth considering. Prescription Sun Glasses - good wrap around sports ...


4

Pros: The ultimate freedom – from where to camp to pace, breaks or even where to go, it is all up to you There is a lot more room in the tent and you can spread your things everywhere No one makes stupid navigation errors and argues about it with you (unless it is you...) When you are camping, you can just read a book, or look at the sunset or just lay ...


4

There are many methods of preserving food for days, weeks, or even years. Traditional methods include canning, pickling, smoking/jerky, and dehydration. There are modern counterparts to all of these. Canned food is not a good choice if you're carrying the food on your backs. Dehydrated and freeze-dried foods are your best bet, combined with non-perishable ...


4

Ice axe The answer to this question is quite surprising: use an ice axe. The self arrest works nearly just like in a icy situation. I taught myself this technique, behind Bill's Barn under Tryfan in early 1963, with a gang of mates, all of us having recently acquired ice axes, by repeatedly throwing ourselves down a slope of pure water ice. By ...


3

I see a good handful of people suggesting what type of clothing should be worn to minimize chaffing, which are great but not always 100% effective. To treat chaffing/rashes between thighs and groins (which I have bad issues with), I suggest bringing some sort of lubricant to apply to stressed areas as they appear. I use Petroleum Jelly and it works like a ...



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