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30

For the purposes of defense, the only situation that comes to mind would be hiking through an area known for criminal activity ( think marijuana farm ). And even then, is a small handgun really going to help you ward off criminals with assault rifles ( it would probably just get you killed faster )? If you're thinking of situation involving large predators, ...


19

If you need to ask, the answer is almost certainly never. There are places (Northern Quebec, Labrador, Ontario and Manitoba near Hudson's Bay) where due to polar bear activity you should be accompanied by a guide/guard who will have a serious rifle and dedicate significant time to watching for bears while you do your scientific research or marvel at the ...


17

No, there is nothing on the AT that justifies carrying a firearm. The extra weight and space is much more of a detriment than the extremely unlikely and frankly inconceivable case where a firearm would be a help. Since the AT crosses many jurisdictions, there may also be legal issues that could vary every few miles. The whole concept just doesn't make ...


12

National parks tend to be absolutely open to anyone, their goal being to allow public enjoyment without compromising the area for future generations. From the park's own website: A permit is not required for front-country camping, hiking, moorage, etc. in most parks. Campsite reservations are accepted at many front-country parks. To be absolutely ...


11

Pressing on your knees will relieve some of the stress on your muscles, giving you additional endurance on a climb, but it puts unnatural stress on the joint. Without going too deep into the specifics of the anatomy, you have four muscles in your "quad" that attach to your patella, which is attached to your tibia (shin) via the patellar tendon. It is ...


9

If you are being attacked by a large predator a "small handgun" will accomplish nothing. If you hit something sensitive you will probably make it angrier - it won't make any difference to you if it dies from it's injuries the day after tomorrow, but at least it had a good final meal. Smith & Wesson used to make a short-barrel .50 revolver aimed at the ...


8

There's always a difference between required and excessive. A lot of these multi tools have specific purposes. Do I require a screwdriver on a trek? Mostly no. Will I use a knife, a pair of scissors or even a pair of tweezers? Mostly Yes. So do I recommend carrying a multi tool to a trek? Yes. But having said that, there are multitude of these tools out ...


8

This isn't really a clear yes/no sort of question, I'm also pretty reticent to tell someone what would be best for their child. Aside from that hopefully someone will provide some information that will make your decision or others thinking of doing the same easier. My first suggestion would be to work out which huts you are thinking of staying at or around ...


8

You're going to have to take a chance. The west coast of Scotland (where Skye is) is the wettest part of the UK. If you're up there for 5 days, it might rain everyday regardless of time of year. That said, statistically, the driest time of the year is between March and May. This also has the advantage of being out of midgy season. I don't believe that Skye ...


8

Here are two pretty useful articles on the correct way to use poles: one shortish one and one longer quite comprehensive one. There are several aims in using a pole. Primarily (IMHO) is to reduce strain on the knees/ankles. Additionally they they provide extra stability on rough ground and can make going uphill easier. The disadvantage is they result in ...


7

Firstly if you are on your own a four man tent is probably excessive. People buy small two man/trekking tents so that it is easy to carry them and one doesn't have this sort of problem. If you are in a larger group then it is not necessary for one person to carry the entire tent. You can break it up into at least poles, fly and inner. Different people can ...


7

I often heard this method is reliable and I am also using it. From experience I can say it works. Also if you search the web you will find articles like for example this and this. Also available are color charts to get an visual impression, see e.g.: Besides that personally I know that I am not prone to get headache. So when I start getting slight ...


7

I do a lot of strength training when not backpacking, and try to keep my protein up around ~140 grams per day, on average. I asked a related question over on the fitness.stackexchange.com site, and at this point make all my own meals (usually with my dehydrator) because I find pre-made-hiker-food to be junk. The lightest protein source I know of is simply ...


6

I don't understand why you're so centric around protein. There are protein bars, some of which contain over 20g of protein. There are also freeze dried meats which is actually more protein dense(higher protien-weight ratio) than protein bars. Freeze dried foods generally offer the best weight to calorie ratio, because they have almost no water weight. Even ...


6

Disclaimer: I rarely use GPS system personally so feel free to correct me if I've misunderstood something. However, I think that 2000 points should be more than enough. Say you are doing a reasonably long route of 40km per day. If you use all 2000 points in that distance that will give you one point every 20m. Give that the accuracy of your GPS under some ...


6

The question has the tag "mountaineering," but most of the time when I hear people say that you need boots with ankle support, they're actually talking about trail-walking. The cases of hiking and mountaineering are qualitatively different. For mountaineering, one big reason people usually don't use lightweight running shoes is that often there is talus, ...


5

Carrying perishable foods is not practical, but it is doable. The only way to do it though is to keep your food cooled, and the easiest way to do that, when it's hot out, is to carry a cooler, which I have definitely gone backpacking with before: There are such things as solar powered coolers, which can keep your food cool without the necessity of ...


5

The main advantage of anti-shock poles is that they tend to be less jolting on joints (like elbows and wrists) when used on firm ground or rocky terrain. On softer ground, where the dirt, sand or snow provides natural impact absorption, they can sometimes feel "mushy", and most people would find the benefits negligible. For this reason (and also to prevent ...


5

I don't think you have to treat that topic significantly different than on lower altitudes (but I have to admit, I have never been higher than 4300 m) as long as you stick to trekking. As you already introduce your question, warming up is especially important for sports where maximum strength (e.g. climbing) and/or explosive muscle movement (e.g. ...


5

I used to do a lot of backpacking with my wife in the backcountry in the Rocky Mountains. The places we hiked were remote - often hours would pass without seeing anybody else. I gave thought to getting a handgun, as protection from bad folks and/or wildlife. My father and I are fisherman, not hunters, so my knowledge of wild animals was minimal, and I had ...


5

While the answers above mainly focus on getting a Easy-To-Carry (new) instrument, I'll stick to an attempt of answering how can one carry a standard guitar like the one I have (a Pluto, acoustic). EDIT: As the question was having an edit about travelling guitars, I am afraid I have no experience with them, but I'd rather think that same packing technique ...


4

Its an answer which you may not find specifically good for you, but rather more of a generic approach towards a person suffering from Acid Reflux. Narrowing down the scope up to foods/meals over a trek, I'd suggest: Yogurt. You can try Trail Yogurt Recipe Peanut butter as against eating Walnuts, Almond, etc. Whatever that is rich with Fiber: Oatmeal, ...


3

There are many methods of preserving food for days, weeks, or even years. Traditional methods include canning, pickling, smoking/jerky, and dehydration. There are modern counterparts to all of these. Canned food is not a good choice if you're carrying the food on your backs. Dehydrated and freeze-dried foods are your best bet, combined with non-perishable ...


3

My solution to this is a Hohner G3T and a 1 Watt Marshall amp. The Hohner fits easily down the side of my bigger rucksacks, and the amp is tiny. They don't add a huge amount to the weight of my pack If the weather is wet I'll wrap them both in a plastic bag, but they have entertained me on many Munro tops. I have never had any wildlife attracted to the ...


3

I carry a compact Victorinox Swiss Army Knife (Huntsman) which I find perfectly adequate for all of the situations I have encountered in the wilderness. If you consider that too heavy to carry (3.5 inches and 28grams) then you need to reevaluate your fitness (joke!) and what kind of trade-offs you are making between weight and functionality. As an ...


3

Pros: The ultimate freedom – from where to camp to pace, breaks or even where to go, it is all up to you There is a lot more room in the tent and you can spread your things everywhere No one makes stupid navigation errors and argues about it with you (unless it is you...) When you are camping, you can just read a book, or look at the sunset or just lay ...


3

We have tried a couple of things. I'm not entirely sure that all would agree up on these measures, but let me state them none the less. Hydrating before you start off the trek (Already stated) Trekking in regions with enough natural water supplies. (Already stated by others) Stashing water along the trek. This works only if you are going to return the same ...


3

This question is extremely subjective, so anyone with experience will (and should) come up with his one personal way. What I will describe is therefore just an idea of when and why to use shoes with ankle support. The distinctions between the two types that cause the different application exceed the (no) ankle support: boots (ankle support) stiff sole ...


3

There are several options Goggles that fit over you prescription glasses (Commonly referred to as "Over the glasses" or just 'OTG'.) - probably the cheapest solution, used successfully by many people. Contact lenses are available for all sorts of prescriptions now days and could be worth considering. Prescription Sun Glasses - good wrap around sports ...



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