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4

My personal opinion is you may be being a little bit optimistic on your speed. I would probably aim for 20-30km per day (~15 miles) if you have not done such a long trip before and are reasonably fit. Although there are several factors to consider: Hiking with a 40lb pack is significantly different and more tiring than hiking with just a day pack, ...


3

Making 30-35 km every day is perfectly sound, if only you're used to making such distance. The famous Polish hiker, Ɓukasz Supergan have written to made 30 km a day on average on his 4000 km long trip to Santiago de Compostella. The trained hiker can made 30-50 km a day without days off. This is confirmed in the memories of wandering workers, partisants, ...


4

Below is the bare minimum list of gear I would require anyone on my team to carry during and rescue operation. It does not include any of the numerous pieces of rope equipment that members of the rope team would cary in addition to the basic equipment ( only specific team members that have completed extensive training are qualified to be involved in any of ...


9

I think there are several factors to consider when traveling alone. Pros You can set your own pace. For me this is one of the main reasons to hike alone. When with other people they often want to go faster than you and you end up breaking yourself trying to keep up or are slower/less confidant and you have to slow down/not do those 'interesting' scrambles ...


6

To be honest, the most important thing a Rescue Team needs to have is plenty of manpower (and womanpower!) with training and experience (speaking as a member of a UK Cave Rescue Team).


3

Depends on what you are going for. If you are heading this up, expect it to be a full-time endeavor for at least a year, and then part time for the lifetime of the hut. Like Nivag said, there are lots of different types of huts, so you have to decide on what you want before anything else. This will depend a lot on how much work you want to put into it, the ...


2

I think nivag covers most of this topic. I just wanted to add some of my experiences. Mountain huts/bothy's cover a very wide range of facilities. Here are two I've actually stayed in to demonstrate this, This one: in north wales consists of four walls, a roof and fire pit, that's it. It's big enough for about 2 people to lie flat. One other hut I stayed ...


9

My experience of mountain huts huts is mainly from UK and Europe. Standards in other parts of the world may vary. Mountain huts come in a wide range of different varieties. At the basic end you have unmanned huts or bothies. These can range from very basic with just a roof and wooden bunks to put your sleeping kit on to reasonably nice with beds, stove, ...



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