Hot answers tagged

23

With fog, the only thing you're losing is extended visibility. This shouldn't throw off your plan too much, unless you were navigating by watching far away landmarks. If you were on a trail, stay on it. There's no need to wander around. If you can't see anything and traveling is becoming dangerous or you're not sure where you're going, then stop and wait ...


23

In the UK we have, comparative to other countries, very few venomous creatures. However the false widow and adders are still a risk. False widows have mostly been recorded in the South of England and Wales (though I've personally never seen one) but have been recorded to have bitten and hospitalise people, whilst this maybe when out and about it has also ...


21

I regularly backpack overnight with two dogs (one is a great dane / lab mix) in the US. A tired dog is a good dog. I have an advantage of several miles of hiking in, but you can still tire the dog out when you get there. A frisbee (flying disc) and swimming works well for my big guy (the lab mix), my smaller girl is tired from the hike itself. Whatever ...


19

In addition to the wildlife hazards mentioned in the other answers, swans and geese can be intimidating even if not highly hazardous - the adage about a swan's wing being able to break your arm is said to be just about true, but unlikely - and walkers occasionally report hostility or aggression from landowners who dispute their right to use a particular ...


18

If you need to walk on a compass bearing in poor visibility, stand still, and send someone out in front of you on the correct bearing for a distance (probably as far as you can see). Have them stand still, then walk to them. Repeat. It's slow going, but you will be walking on the correct bearing, and more accurate than just holding the compass out in front ...


18

This behavior is well-known to be honest. There's this myth that white-tail activity increases if it rains (the deer seeks shelter). However, the truth is that this doesn't really affect the daily routine. The animal just takes it as something what happens from time to time. As you may already know the two main sense of a deer is its ability to smell and ...


16

This is really interesting, and I think it might be similar to why we don't generally have snow tires / chains etc as a common item here in stores. Certainly the South rarely gets snow, with Wales, The North and Scotland being more likely to get snow days. From the MET Office: The UK gets on average 33 days of snow fall or sleet a year (1971 - 2000). ...


14

Safety is fine, so long as you are prepared and can read a map adequately. The UK has something called the "Countryside code". This is not a legal requirement but a blueprint about how to behave in the wild in the UK. Full information is available from the ramblers association. Some of the more important points here: Respect the needs of local people ...


13

All land in the UK is owned by somebody, therefore, all trees and their produce (including firewood) are owned by somebody. You could be charged with theft if you take logs, kindling etc. without permission. The Jeremy Vine Show on BBC Radio 2 on 6th January 2012 discussed this very topic following the storms in the UK around that time, that left a lot of ...


12

I think your assumptions are correct. To my knowledge in a mountain environment you are quite safe as long as you follow some simple rules, which you mostly already named: The water was not standing, i.e. it comes from a stream that is rather fast and the stream is big enough that it is not just a connection of puddles or ponds where the water rinses ...


11

There's a decent thread discussing this issue over at BPL. Based on that and similar discussions, my suggestions would be as follows: Cover the floor of the tent with a tarp or similar material. While the flooring will probably be fine, this will provide additional protection (and simplify cleanup if there's mud involved). (When wild camping you can ...


10

In general the british isles are very safe. Most paths are well marked, dangerous areas are also marked off, and there are no large predators or other animals that are a serious threat to humans. Wildlife The other answer already covered this well. Essentially there are no animals in the British isles that are deliberately dangerous to you, although there ...


10

Apparently it was removed due to lack of funding for repairs. Here's a link to an article about it. Here's a link to a picture for the curious. Too bad.


10

First of all don't scratch. blood sucking insects inject anti-coagulant under your skin to prevent your blood from clotting and forming a scab so they don't get their mouthes stuck inside you while sucking. If you scratch, you only manage to spread the anti-coagulant around under your skin, which intensifies the itch and makes things worse. Train your brain ...


10

One very helpful thing is to brush him while you're towel drying. The brushing will help separate the hair to keep it from matting and will allow more air drying to occur. Also, if you use chamois leather to dry him off initially it will keep you from soaking a towel right away. The chamois will absorb a lot of water, but is easily wrung out to absorb ...


9

Pacing and timing can be used to aid navigation in poor visibility. Both methods improve as you gain experience by practicing pacing and timing over different terrains. Pacing by counting steps (beads on your compass lanyard or a mechanical counter will help you avoid loosing count) to estimate distance travelled from a known location. Timing based on, for ...


9

It is very safe to walk alone in England. The standard walks will have lots of others walking along them. Wild camping is frowned upon in many places. Procedures: leaving gates as you find them. Carrying your rubbish to a dustbin. Look in the right direction when crossing a road. On roads, walk facing the traffic. In the countryside you should say "Hello" ...


9

Your best bet is to study an Ordance Survey map of the area. Incidently you can get these off Bing which is cool. I'd look for a campsite symbol with some form of forest near by: Preferably deciduous forest, which will have well spaced out trees, forestry commision land tends to be densely packed: The same applies for any wild camping spots. Bear in ...


9

That actually looks to be a Woodlouse Hunter (Dysdera crocata). They prey exclusively on woodlice. They also go by a few other names such as: woodlouse spider, sowbug hunter, sowbug killer, pillbug hunter, and slater spider. Image source: http://www.whatsthatbug.com/category/spiders/sow-bug-killers/ From the Pennsylvania State Entomology Department site: ...


9

wild camping in the UK is a gray area. Technically it is illegal to wild camp anywhere (Scotland and Dartmoor are the exceptions it is actually legal to wild camp in any unenclosed area there). Practically though, wild camping is tolerated in most wild areas (unenclosed remote areas like the breacon's). You need to be careful though and obey some simple ...


9

I think the main difference is probably in British vs American (/rest of the world) English. Fell is a particularly British term referring to areas such as the Lake district that does not really have a direct equivalent in many other places. Following from this in the UK there is the Fell runners association, whereas in the US the equivalent would be the ...


9

Foraging is actually really easy in the UK, there are plenty of easy start plants and berries you can look for. Do you require anything specific to start doing this? Realistically, no not at all, as some plants you can forage in your own back garden. However, it's a good idea to get yourself a decent reference book - we brought the Collins pocket guide ...


8

The bottom line is there is always SOME risk. Whether to take that risk or not is your choice. Fast running + isolated + high elevation = prettttty low risk. With that said the biggest concern is, unless you are drinking right from the source, you have no idea what has happened upstream from you. There could be a dead animal snagged in the stream, animal ...


8

The Scottish 'code' mentions specific rights on the 'foreshore' What about public rights on the foreshore? 2.18 Public rights on the foreshore and in tidal waters will continue to exist. These have not been fully defined but include shooting wildfowl, fishing for sea fish, gathering some uncultivated shellfish, lighting fires, swimming, playing ...


8

Some answers: 1 - http://www.canoe-england.org.uk is an excellent website for this sort of thing. 2 - It would be acceptable to use a sea kayak. 3 - Completely depends on your kayak. For a quick temporary repair, you may be able to get away with a patch and glue (costing about £5) but you'd be better off with cloth tape and fibreglass resin if you have ...


8

Not sure how hazardous they are, but wasps, bees, hornets etc could spoil your trip in sufficient numbers or if you have an allergy to them. The NHS has a good page on biting/stinging insects, how to avoid them and what to do if you don't: 12 UK insects and bugs that bite or sting


8

All under £3: What about a Spork everyone should have a spork.... Vango eye light £3 bargain Vango mug


8

In addition to the good answer by Aravona, there are two important reasons: Snow shoes are impractical on steep terrain because they put a lot of stress on your ankles. If you are going to buy equipment for going up snow-covered mountains, there is a much better solution: mountain skis with skins attached. Skins increase the grip tremendously. Example: ...


8

I absolutely love bats and always have. In the UK we have eighteen species of bat. The Bat Conservation have a nice list for all the common UK species, including those which breed in the UK (which is 17 out of the 18 species, so we're doing quite well!). The above link also has a recording of the noise each bat makes, which should help you work out the ...


7

There's a whole bunch of standard map and compass techniques you can use without a GPS. If you know your location before the fog came down, then you're not lost - you just can't see so far. Change your navigation strategy to have shorter legs, and pick tick points that will be within your vision. Pay particular attention to changes in trail direction and ...



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