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18

With fog, the only thing you're losing is extended visibility. This shouldn't throw off your plan too much, unless you were navigating by watching far away landmarks. If you were on a trail, stay on it. There's no need to wander around. If you can't see anything and traveling is becoming dangerous or you're not sure where you're going, then stop and wait ...


13

All land in the UK is owned by somebody, therefore, all trees and their produce (including firewood) are owned by somebody. You could be charged with theft if you take logs, kindling etc. without permission. The Jeremy Vine Show on BBC Radio 2 on 6th January 2012 discussed this very topic following the storms in the UK around that time, that left a lot of ...


11

If you need to walk on a compass bearing in poor visibility, stand still, and send someone out in front of you on the correct bearing for a distance (probably as far as you can see). Have them stand still, then walk to them. Repeat. It's slow going, but you will be walking on the correct bearing, and more accurate than just holding the compass out in front ...


6

The bottom line is there is always SOME risk. Whether to take that risk or not is your choice. Fast running + isolated + high elevation = prettttty low risk. With that said the biggest concern is, unless you are drinking right from the source, you have no idea what has happened upstream from you. There could be a dead animal snagged in the stream, animal ...


6

The Scottish 'code' mentions specific rights on the 'foreshore' What about public rights on the foreshore? 2.18 Public rights on the foreshore and in tidal waters will continue to exist. These have not been fully defined but include shooting wildfowl, fishing for sea fish, gathering some uncultivated shellfish, lighting fires, swimming, playing ...


6

Pacing and timing can be used to aid navigation in poor visibility. Both methods improve as you gain experience by practicing pacing and timing over different terrains. Pacing by counting steps (beads on your compass lanyard or a mechanical counter will help you avoid loosing count) to estimate distance travelled from a known location. Timing based on, for ...


5

This depends of course on the tools you have and what your overall situation is. For example, if you know that you are on a certain path and you have a compass, and if you are on a slope, you can try to figure out the direction of the slope and compare that to the slopes along the path you are on using your topographic map.


5

Upfront I would like to mention that I don't live in the UK, but I hope my answer is still relevant. The most commonly used stove brand in the US is Coleman, and I looked on amazon.co.uk, and it looks like they are common in the UK as well. For Coleman camping stoves you can buy adapter cables to connect them to large, refillable propane tanks. The common ...


5

I think your assumptions are correct. To my knowledge in a mountain environment you are quite safe as long as you follow some simple rules, which you mostly already named: The water was not standing, i.e. it comes from a stream that is rather fast and the stream is big enough that it is not just a connection of puddles or ponds where the water rinses ...


4

They are marked on OS 1:25K Explorer maps as "Byways open to all traffic". But it's a good idea to research your route beforehand as some (like the Monk's Trod) are now closed by traffic regulation orders - primarily because of the damage caused by off-roaders.


4

Canyoning aka Gorge Walking or Gorge Scrambling takes place in the Brecon Beacons National Park, the best known location for this activity in the UK! http://blueocean-adventure.co.uk/gorge-scrambling/


3

according to the boyscout handbook you can use moss (apparently it usualy/always grows on the North side of the tree...) It is generally believed that in northern latitudes, the north side of trees and rocks will generally have more luxuriant moss growth on average than other sides. This is assumed to be because the sun on the south side creates a dry ...


3

Fires are permitted, as is free camping provided it does not interfere with agriculture or nature. Scottish Outdoor Access Code England and Wales have a slightly different code


3

I actually went Gorge Walking weekend before last near a place called Clydach (Cwm Dyar), and it was brilliant :) I went with a group of about fifteen of us and I organised it through a chap called Michael at http://www.lifechangingactivities.com/ There are some great places as @Berry120 has said in the Brecon Beacons such as the Afon Mellte - beautiful ...


2

Another guide book option for you might be the BMC sport climbing guide. http://www.bmcshop.co.uk/product_info.php?products_id=5299


2

Maybe the ROCKFAX? http://www.rockfax.com/climbing-guides/books/northern-england-2008/ By the way, this is a great site for finding info on crags in a given area: http://www.ukclimbing.com/logbook/map/ - once you find a crag it also lists relevant guidebooks.


2

Some petrol stations have a stock of LPG canisters outside, which I'm pretty sure are meant to be returned to be refilled - these are known as 'Calor gas' after the name of the dominant company in this market. They go from about 5kg upward, which I guess is quite large. I've never bought one, so am not sure how you'd go about it. Check which type of gas ...


2

Ok, first thing to note is who owns the coast. The land between the high water mark and the low water mark is owned by the crown (crown reserves) in UK law. (ref) The land above he high water mark is owned by land owners, this may also be the crown if it's common land etc. Any land owned by private land owners is subject to the land owners themselves. They ...


2

From a search around, it seems there's a number of places that do it in the SW of England, Devon seeming to come up a lot: http://www.yumping.co.uk/canyoning/south-west-england The other place where it seems to be popular is in the Brecon Beacons in Wales, and around that general area: http://www.adventurebritain.com/canyoning-in-wales-uk/


2

There's a whole bunch of standard map and compass techniques you can use without a GPS. If you know your location before the fog came down, then you're not lost - you just can't see so far. Change your navigation strategy to have shorter legs, and pick tick points that will be within your vision. Pay particular attention to changes in trail direction and ...


2

You don't say what area specifically you're looking at, or what your budget is - but Anquet seems to do a number of electronic copies of standard OS maps for prices I wouldn't consider unreasonable here. Of course, if you mean the whole of the UK / Europe then the cost will be high, but I don't think there's really much getting around that. It unfortunately ...



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