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15

I regularly backpack overnight with two dogs (one is a great dane / lab mix) in the US. A tired dog is a good dog. I have an advantage of several miles of hiking in, but you can still tire the dog out when you get there. A frisbee (flying disc) and swimming works well for my big guy (the lab mix), my smaller girl is tired from the hike itself. Whatever ...


8

There's a decent thread discussing this issue over at BPL. Based on that and similar discussions, my suggestions would be as follows: Cover the floor of the tent with a tarp or similar material. While the flooring will probably be fine, this will provide additional protection (and simplify cleanup if there's mud involved). (When wild camping you can ...


6

The bottom line is there is always SOME risk. Whether to take that risk or not is your choice. Fast running + isolated + high elevation = prettttty low risk. With that said the biggest concern is, unless you are drinking right from the source, you have no idea what has happened upstream from you. There could be a dead animal snagged in the stream, animal ...


5

Upfront I would like to mention that I don't live in the UK, but I hope my answer is still relevant. The most commonly used stove brand in the US is Coleman, and I looked on amazon.co.uk, and it looks like they are common in the UK as well. For Coleman camping stoves you can buy adapter cables to connect them to large, refillable propane tanks. The common ...


5

I think your assumptions are correct. To my knowledge in a mountain environment you are quite safe as long as you follow some simple rules, which you mostly already named: The water was not standing, i.e. it comes from a stream that is rather fast and the stream is big enough that it is not just a connection of puddles or ponds where the water rinses ...


5

There isn't a problem carrying fuel for camping stoves (assuming in "sensible" quanities) in the UK. HOWEVER, when wild camping (i.e camping off of organised camp sites) in the UK, the ethos is to leave no trace afterwards. So setting camp fires is a no-no. And on many organised camp sites, open fires are forbidden (although some do allow small fires and ...


4

Some answers: 1 - http://www.canoe-england.org.uk is an excellent website for this sort of thing. 2 - It would be acceptable to use a sea kayak. 3 - Completely depends on your kayak. For a quick temporary repair, you may be able to get away with a patch and glue (costing about £5) but you'd be better off with cloth tape and fibreglass resin if you have ...


4

I regularly take my two medium-sized dogs car camping and keep them inside the tent with me. I initially took them on a practice trip to a nearby park and let them sleep in the tent with me. The dogs tore holes in the mesh because they kept trying to go after animals. We learned two lessons: Dogs that can see out want to get out. We put the rain fly on and ...


3

I usually use trekking poles when walking and have been for over 20 years as it helps prevent knee injury so I would use them with a tarp. Since you want to use a dedicated pole for a tarp which is lightweight, you could have a look at this one http://www.backpackinglight.co.uk/shelter-accessories/WA114.html from a UK website dedicated to lightweight gear. ...


3

The other answers address your question pretty well but I think you might have jumped in a bit head-first with your research and that maybe the question that you should be asking is "What's the best way of getting into kayaking" The best thing to do is go find your local club - it's by far the safest, cheapest, friendliest and most effective way of ...


2

You could think through some of the possible problems based on your knowledge of the area: roads with fast traffic; cattle that could hurt the dog; livestock such as chickens that the dog could kill; other dogs that live there and would be defending their territory. If none of these seems like a real issue, then I would just let the dog roam freely around ...


2

Another guide book option for you might be the BMC sport climbing guide. http://www.bmcshop.co.uk/product_info.php?products_id=5299


2

Maybe the ROCKFAX? http://www.rockfax.com/climbing-guides/books/northern-england-2008/ By the way, this is a great site for finding info on crags in a given area: http://www.ukclimbing.com/logbook/map/ - once you find a crag it also lists relevant guidebooks.


2

Some petrol stations have a stock of LPG canisters outside, which I'm pretty sure are meant to be returned to be refilled - these are known as 'Calor gas' after the name of the dominant company in this market. They go from about 5kg upward, which I guess is quite large. I've never bought one, so am not sure how you'd go about it. Check which type of gas ...


2

Ok, first thing to note is who owns the coast. The land between the high water mark and the low water mark is owned by the crown (crown reserves) in UK law. (ref) The land above he high water mark is owned by land owners, this may also be the crown if it's common land etc. Any land owned by private land owners is subject to the land owners themselves. They ...


2

4 - In Scotland, you have a general right of access under the Scottish Outdoor Access Code. This applies to just about all land and inland waters, and allows non-motorised recreation and passage. So this includes kayaking and canoeing on rivers, lochs and canals. These rights are dependent on being responsible, eg avoid disturbing other people or damaging ...


1

Many ultra light tents which use trekking poles as part of the framing offer the alternative of using carbon fiber poles (1-2oz), carbon fiber and fiberglass (1.8oz), or aluminium (4oz). I used one carbon fiber pole over a long period of time for the awning of my LightHeart Solo tent (they only sell aluminium now). In one of my first outing with the carbon ...



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