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19

This behavior is well-known to be honest. There's this myth that white-tail activity increases if it rains (the deer seeks shelter). However, the truth is that this doesn't really affect the daily routine. The animal just takes it as something what happens from time to time. As you may already know the two main sense of a deer is its ability to smell and ...


10

One very helpful thing is to brush him while you're towel drying. The brushing will help separate the hair to keep it from matting and will allow more air drying to occur. Also, if you use chamois leather to dry him off initially it will keep you from soaking a towel right away. The chamois will absorb a lot of water, but is easily wrung out to absorb ...


9

Foraging is actually really easy in the UK, there are plenty of easy start plants and berries you can look for. Do you require anything specific to start doing this? Realistically, no not at all, as some plants you can forage in your own back garden. However, it's a good idea to get yourself a decent reference book - we brought the Collins pocket guide ...


9

The osprey does seem the most likely option. There are only a handful of breeding pairs in North Wales, but they are in your area so it's credible. The wingspan of a small common buzzard starts at around 110cm and a large osprey can reach 170cm, so although they are normally of similar size the wingspan differential is possible. And the osprey has the white ...


9

I think the main difference is probably in British vs American (/rest of the world) English. Fell is a particularly British term referring to areas such as the Lake district that does not really have a direct equivalent in many other places. Following from this in the UK there is the Fell runners association, whereas in the US the equivalent would be the ...


8

I absolutely love bats and always have. In the UK we have eighteen species of bat. The Bat Conservation have a nice list for all the common UK species, including those which breed in the UK (which is 17 out of the 18 species, so we're doing quite well!). The above link also has a recording of the noise each bat makes, which should help you work out the ...


7

There is one poisonous: the Desmarestia. The other species should be okay. However, I can't say anything about if they are "worth eating" :) Desmarestia is a genus of brown algae found worldwide. Members of this genus can be either annual or perennial. Annual members of this genus can produce and store sulfuric acid in intracellular vacuoles. When ...


7

It's certainly possible in North Wales, one was reported near Mold a couple of weeks ago and they're quite mobile at this time of year. I don't think you can rule out common buzzard for several reasons: The colouring of buzzards (buteo buteo) is highly variable. They can easily look as black-and-white as an osprey. One living near me was entirely white ...


6

This isn't a knife, it's a saw. So the knife laws don't apply. Anyone can carry a saw (Woodmen, carpenters, etc.). So yes, there should be no problem with carrying a saw in open land. You state: UK law states the legal carry for a knife is less than 3 inches and must be a non-locking folding blade. that's incorrect though, the UK law states: ...


6

If you are backpacking or trying to travel light, bring a separate tent for the dog. There are lots of small tents built with this in mind. Even a small tarp will do the trick, if you aren't worried about bugs. A patch of grass under the tarp will make him perfectly happy. (You'll need to use a tie-out if you go with a tarp, of course.) For car camping, we ...


6

This answer may apply to other countries but is pretty cert for the UK. Bird feed sold in the UK (from big chain pet stores, to garden centres, to little corner shops) usually comes with a time of year printed on the packet. This can be Spring-Summer, Winter or All Year for example. Which is because we get a cycle of birds throught the year and what is good ...


5

Although I have not found IUCN Level II protected areas, there do exist areas with a higher level than national parks. So, for are there at least areas with a protection level stricter than what UK National Parks have?, the answer is yes. Within England, there exist National Nature Reserves. According to Protected Planet, those are protected at IUCN level ...


5

The UK has an incredibly high population density (262 people per km). This is one of the highest in the developed world. Though your correct there are higher,Holland has a higher one actually but they also have space issue, that's why the reclaim land using dykes, etc. The UK was also the birth place of the industrial revolution in the 1800-1900s and as ...


5

Yes loads! They're currently a very popular hedge bush. You'll likely find them along all new housing developments. Especially speaking for in the South of the UK, my development is only 4 years old and we have them there - much to my pleasure! My old development is now around 15-20 years old and has them as well. It's also quite common to find it in towns ...


4

This pretty much boils down to access. If you have the right to access the area, the fact that it is a historical site means little. So if there is a footpath you can walk along the footpath. If it's open access area, common land or right to roam then again no issues. If it's owned then you must obey the laws of the land/owner for example many historical ...


4

Great question. In the UK a lot of historical sites are not only accessible but encouraged to explore! You can hike around and in many hill forts, for example, many of which are on National Trust property so they often signpost how to get to them. You can (and I have!) hike over the Nine Barrow Downs, which is a very interesting site. It's a chalk hill ...


4

The best time of year in the UK to go foraging for sloes is from mid-October to early-November, with the best time being after the first frost in this time frame. Allowing a frost will help the berries be less tough - their skins should burst slightly. Some people say don't worry about the frost and just stick them in the fridge or freezer - but from ...


4

The best way to identify bats in flight is to use a bat detector. This is a device with a microphone that listens to the bats high frequency calls, and plays them back at a lower frequency. Bats use echolocation calls to find out what is around them. For most UK bats, these are typically between 30KHz and 80KHz. So they are not audible to humans. Different ...


4

I camp regularly with my black labrador in the UK. I have an old sleeping bag I use for her, it has her smell and she can curl up in it if it gets cold. She sleeps in the sleeping compartment. I tend to find there isn't an issue when she is in the tent, as others have said if you walk a few miles and tire them out then they don't tend to misbehave in the ...


4

Hobby and kestrel are among the 60 varieties of birds of prey in the falcon family. Similarities in their body shape and color make it hard to tell them apart, especially without binoculars. I tend to leave mine at home, or lock them in the car, where they do me no good at all once I'm off wandering through the woods!! There is one glaring difference you'd ...


4

In that area, Hen Harriers are reasonably common. They feed on the grouse on the moorland to the south. By Andreas Trepte (Own work) [CC BY-SA 2.5 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5)], via Wikimedia Commons It's distinctivley a Raptor, with a noticable larger wingspan than the buzzard. They circle at times, much like Buzzards. I've personally ...


3

Is it safe to drink water from streams in Dartmoor using simple purification methods? Basically it depends on the water source. Follow some general rules and you should be fine though. boil for four minutes to kill off any nasties. bear in mind this won't remove all polutants, something like mercury will not be affected by boiling. A nano filter (...


3

Swifts tend to fly higher than swallow and house martins, but the biggest giveaway is the noise they make. From almost the same page you linked you can listen to the audio file. A swift call is a screech, even a scream. You can quite often hear them before you see them (they tend to occur in decent numbers when the noise is almost non-stop) Swallows and ...


3

You can see a list of the mebership discounts currently at: https://www.thebmc.co.uk/membership-discounts It covers a wide variety of things. TBH, if your looking to join the BMC for a discount it's likely not worth it. Often I get better discounts from memberships to walls, etc. (hold on a second while I get on this high horse) The BMC is really ...


2

If you expect itchy insect bites, I can recommend a dedicated heat stick for treating the bites. Something like this: Therapik Mosquito Bite Reliever It does work, at least temporarily. The mechanism is often said to be the denaturing of the proteins due to heat. However the heat is not sufficient for that. What apparently really happens is that the local ...


2

Here in the US, it depends on whether it's just a historical site, or if there are artifacts. Disturbing or defacing historical or archeological artifacts on public lands is a felony, and is taken quite seriously. Of course signs trump everything. If a sign says, "keep out" and there is a fence or even just a ribbon denoting the area to stay out of, stay ...


2

Using Google, I found several lists of inland dive sites in the UK. Here are a few of the more extensive ones. UK Diving (over 50 current and former sites, listed by region) Dive Site Directory (14 sites, clickable map) UK Dive Guide (35 sites, listed by region) SCUBA Diving Adviser (17 sites, interactive map) These websites provide varying amount of ...


1

According to Wikipedia, the largest ancient woodland is the "Windsor Great Park" (1777 Ha) :) However, this one doesn't really fit into your description, does it? The next biggest woodland is King's and Baker's Wood (212 Ha). Further information: http://www.protectedplanet.net/136567


1

In the UK the prevailing wind blows from the south west and trees/ bushes grow away from the wind so assuming one can see a tree it should be easy to determine the other points of the compass. Elsewhere in the world it would be sensible to determine the direction of the prevailing wind prior to setting out.


1

Some other ideas: plasters/band-aid (if you don't worry about them getting "expired") cat-eye reflectors (even upcycled ones), to be mounted on bagpacks small, one-usage raincoats



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