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20

In the UK we have, comparative to other countries, very few venomous creatures. However the false widow and adders are still a risk. False widows have mostly been recorded in the South of England and Wales (though I've personally never seen one) but have been recorded to have bitten and hospitalise people, whilst this maybe when out and about it has also ...


17

In addition to the wildlife hazards mentioned in the other answers, swans and geese can be intimidating even if not highly hazardous - the adage about a swan's wing being able to break your arm is said to be just about true, but unlikely - and walkers occasionally report hostility or aggression from landowners who dispute their right to use a particular ...


16

I regularly backpack overnight with two dogs (one is a great dane / lab mix) in the US. A tired dog is a good dog. I have an advantage of several miles of hiking in, but you can still tire the dog out when you get there. A frisbee (flying disc) and swimming works well for my big guy (the lab mix), my smaller girl is tired from the hike itself. Whatever ...


15

This is really interesting, and I think it might be similar to why we don't generally have snow tires / chains etc as a common item here in stores. Certainly the South rarely gets snow, with Wales, The North and Scotland being more likely to get snow days. From the MET Office: The UK gets on average 33 days of snow fall or sleet a year (1971 - 2000). ...


10

Apparently it was removed due to lack of funding for repairs. Here's a link to an article about it. Here's a link to a picture for the curious. Too bad.


9

In general the british isles are very safe. Most paths are well marked, dangerous areas are also marked off, and there are no large predators or other animals that are a serious threat to humans. Wildlife The other answer already covered this well. Essentially there are no animals in the British isles that are deliberately dangerous to you, although there ...


8

Your best bet is to study an Ordance Survey map of the area. Incidently you can get these off Bing which is cool. I'd look for a campsite symbol with some form of forest near by: Preferably deciduous forest, which will have well spaced out trees, forestry commision land tends to be densely packed: The same applies for any wild camping spots. Bear in ...


8

There's a decent thread discussing this issue over at BPL. Based on that and similar discussions, my suggestions would be as follows: Cover the floor of the tent with a tarp or similar material. While the flooring will probably be fine, this will provide additional protection (and simplify cleanup if there's mud involved). (When wild camping you can ...


7

All under £3: What about a Spork everyone should have a spork.... Vango eye light £3 bargain Vango mug


7

Not sure how hazardous they are, but wasps, bees, hornets etc could spoil your trip in sufficient numbers or if you have an allergy to them. The NHS has a good page on biting/stinging insects, how to avoid them and what to do if you don't: 12 UK insects and bugs that bite or sting


7

Some answers: 1 - http://www.canoe-england.org.uk is an excellent website for this sort of thing. 2 - It would be acceptable to use a sea kayak. 3 - Completely depends on your kayak. For a quick temporary repair, you may be able to get away with a patch and glue (costing about £5) but you'd be better off with cloth tape and fibreglass resin if you have ...


7

There are 282 Munros scattered all over the 30,414 sq mi of Scotland. The average time taken to bag all the Munros is eight years.... The fastest munro bagging is 48 days 12 hours. I'd imagine you could probably double this unless your a world renowned fell runner. There's no standard route to do it all in one go, because very few people try. You're going ...


7

In addition to the good answer by Aravona, there are two important reasons: Snow shoes are impractical on steep terrain because they put a lot of stress on your ankles. If you are going to buy equipment for going up snow-covered mountains, there is a much better solution: mountain skis with skins attached. Skins increase the grip tremendously. Example: ...


6

There isn't a problem carrying fuel for camping stoves (assuming in "sensible" quanities) in the UK. HOWEVER, when wild camping (i.e camping off of organised camp sites) in the UK, the ethos is to leave no trace afterwards. So setting camp fires is a no-no. And on many organised camp sites, open fires are forbidden (although some do allow small fires and ...


6

Although I had originally thought Wikipedia had a good list, nivag pointed me in the direction of walkhighlands, and the Munro Society pages have more info. 1884 - 236 1891 - 282 or 283 1921 - 276 1974 - 279 1981 - 1984 - 1990 - 1997 - 284 2009 - 283 2012 - 282


6

A list of changes to the Munro list and database of Muroes and tops can be found here. The list is maintained by the Scottish Mountaineering club (SMC) and is published in the SMC journal. As far as I am aware an update is only published when there is a change to the list. This is normally because of new survey data putting a mountain above or below 3000’ ...


6

It would be worth getting a copy of "Hamish's Mountain Walk: The First Traverse of All the Scottish Munros in One Journey" by Hamish Brown. Hamish Brown was the first to do the Munros on a continuous round. If a winter attempt interests you (obviously a more serious undertaking), then Martin Moran's The Munros in Winter is also worth getting. Even if you ...


5

button compass pencil sharpener magnifying glass (updates when I think of some more)


5

What about the Chilterns (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chiltern_Hills) Relatively near, though not very high


5

To quote UK Fossils, picking out a few of the many areas they suggest where Fossils are Common or Often Found in the North: North Wales: The North of Wales is well known for is Carboniferous limestone rocks. These rocks contain fossils of corals, brachiopods, and crinoids. Some of the most popular areas to collect are on Anglesey. The best locations ...


4

I regularly take my two medium-sized dogs car camping and keep them inside the tent with me. I initially took them on a practice trip to a nearby park and let them sleep in the tent with me. The dogs tore holes in the mesh because they kept trying to go after animals. We learned two lessons: Dogs that can see out want to get out. We put the rain fly on and ...


4

The other answers address your question pretty well but I think you might have jumped in a bit head-first with your research and that maybe the question that you should be asking is "What's the best way of getting into kayaking" The best thing to do is go find your local club - it's by far the safest, cheapest, friendliest and most effective way of ...


4

4 - In Scotland, you have a general right of access under the Scottish Outdoor Access Code. This applies to just about all land and inland waters, and allows non-motorised recreation and passage. So this includes kayaking and canoeing on rivers, lochs and canals. These rights are dependent on being responsible, eg avoid disturbing other people or damaging ...


4

I usually use trekking poles when walking and have been for over 20 years as it helps prevent knee injury so I would use them with a tarp. Since you want to use a dedicated pole for a tarp which is lightweight, you could have a look at this one http://www.backpackinglight.co.uk/shelter-accessories/WA114.html from a UK website dedicated to lightweight gear. ...


4

In addition to the good advice already offered in other answers: The national parks have websites offering you advice on safety - e.g. for Snowdonia, Dartmoor. Military 'live firing ranges' exist in some more remote parts of the UK such as Dartmoor. This means that the military use them for firing live ammunition (not blanks, actual explosives). Such areas ...


4

The main areas for caving in the UK are: The Yorkshire Dales The Peak District South Wales The Mendip Hills (near Bristol) The North Pennines There are other, smaller areas as well, such as: Forest of Dean, Devon, Barrow in Furness, Assynt (in Scotland). The UK Caving WIKI has some more information on this. If you would like to get back into caving, ...


3

A few others I could think of: Foxes Foxes are generally not aggressive are easily scared away by humans. However, there have been cases of fox attacks of on small children. It should be noted these incidents are very rare. Interestingly this appears to be more of an urban problem possibly caused by the close proximity between humans and foxes and the ...


3

A cheap ($17) camera! Would document geocachers, perhaps with instructions to take your pic! Keychain Camera Small laser pointer. Batteries last a long time, light shines long distance, and it's lightweight - great to help emergency crews find you.


3

I have found that the forestry commission runs 'private' forests too. We should call them woodlands I suppose. However, to the question. The trees may have been planted methodically in neat lines but some saplings die. I have slept in the woodlands around Macclesfield and found some of the more mature trees to be too far apart, even the pines. I use tree ...


3

Just to add to Liams answer: Plan your trip and search for natural campsites (so don't go for the busy familily and tourist ones). I found they mostly have two parts, one open-ish field and a forest part with 'normal' tree spacing. Since I mostly go car camping I will often hang one side of my hammock of the roof of my jeep thus requiring one less tree. ...



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