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16

This is really interesting, and I think it might be similar to why we don't generally have snow tires / chains etc as a common item here in stores. Certainly the South rarely gets snow, with Wales, The North and Scotland being more likely to get snow days. From the MET Office: The UK gets on average 33 days of snow fall or sleet a year (1971 - 2000). ...


10

First of all don't scratch. blood sucking insects inject anti-coagulant under your skin to prevent your blood from clotting and forming a scab so they don't get their mouthes stuck inside you while sucking. If you scratch, you only manage to spread the anti-coagulant around under your skin, which intensifies the itch and makes things worse. Train your brain ...


10

Apparently it was removed due to lack of funding for repairs. Here's a link to an article about it. Here's a link to a picture for the curious. Too bad.


9

That actually looks to be a Woodlouse Hunter (Dysdera crocata). They prey exclusively on woodlice. They also go by a few other names such as: woodlouse spider, sowbug hunter, sowbug killer, pillbug hunter, and slater spider. Image source: http://www.whatsthatbug.com/category/spiders/sow-bug-killers/ From the Pennsylvania State Entomology Department site: ...


8

In addition to the good answer by Aravona, there are two important reasons: Snow shoes are impractical on steep terrain because they put a lot of stress on your ankles. If you are going to buy equipment for going up snow-covered mountains, there is a much better solution: mountain skis with skins attached. Skins increase the grip tremendously. Example: ...


7

There is not really a defined time in which midges are out and about, but usually they are seen from early June until October. Midge season heavily depends on the weather and a wet and cold June will mean less midgets or a later start to the season (as it happens this year). For a really good resource to know about midges is the Midge Forecast that gives ...


7

wild camping in the UK is a gray area. Technically it is illegal to wild camp anywhere (Scotland and Dartmoor are the exceptions it is actually legal to wild camp in any unenclosed area there). Practically though, wild camping is tolerated in most wild areas (unenclosed remote areas like the breacon's). You need to be careful though and obey some simple ...


7

There are 282 Munros scattered all over the 30,414 sq mi of Scotland. The average time taken to bag all the Munros is eight years.... The fastest munro bagging is 48 days 12 hours. I'd imagine you could probably double this unless your a world renowned fell runner. There's no standard route to do it all in one go, because very few people try. You're going ...


6

A list of changes to the Munro list and database of Muroes and tops can be found here. The list is maintained by the Scottish Mountaineering club (SMC) and is published in the SMC journal. As far as I am aware an update is only published when there is a change to the list. This is normally because of new survey data putting a mountain above or below 3000’ ...


6

Although I had originally thought Wikipedia had a good list, nivag pointed me in the direction of walkhighlands, and the Munro Society pages have more info. 1884 - 236 1891 - 282 or 283 1921 - 276 1974 - 279 1981 - 1984 - 1990 - 1997 - 284 2009 - 283 2012 - 282


6

It would be worth getting a copy of "Hamish's Mountain Walk: The First Traverse of All the Scottish Munros in One Journey" by Hamish Brown. Hamish Brown was the first to do the Munros on a continuous round. If a winter attempt interests you (obviously a more serious undertaking), then Martin Moran's The Munros in Winter is also worth getting. Even if you ...


6

To quote UK Fossils, picking out a few of the many areas they suggest where Fossils are Common or Often Found in the North: North Wales: The North of Wales is well known for is Carboniferous limestone rocks. These rocks contain fossils of corals, brachiopods, and crinoids. Some of the most popular areas to collect are on Anglesey. The best locations ...


6

Plantago works excellent againt nettle because of its anti-histamin properties and, in my experience, also against musquito bites. It grows usually in the neighbourhoud of nettle and might be the only plants that survices on a pathway: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plantago --> uses You need to crush the leaves and apply it on the 'wound'. (it's like ...


6

First things first you need to contact the correct authorities. You require written permission to trap crayfish in the UK. There was an episode of River Cottage where they trapped them on the River Kennet. The Gov website doesn't list where you can or cannot trap signals, as you need landowners and angling club permission to trap on our lakes and rivers. ...


5

Over the counter antihistamine products - especially tablets (due to light weight and effectiveness), but also topical creams such as stop itch and antihistamines are the most effective solution. These should be carried in your first aid kit if you have a history of allergy problems. Even for those that normally don't have problems, the size and weight of ...


5

The only thing I can recommend from experience is mud: Cover the itching area with plenty of it and the itching will go away. After the mud dried out and has fallen off, sometimes the bites start to itch again, just reapply. But in most cases I never had to do that again. Generally cold helps by dulling the itching. The opposite, heat, will temporarily ...


5

Of the three possibles I came up with from your description (wagtail, oystercatcher and lapwing), wagtail was ruled out by its size, and you would have seen an oystercatcher's beak as they are pretty bright (and oystercatchers don't have a swooping flight) - the only one that matches correctly is the lapwing. It is black and white and has very squared off ...


5

What about the Chilterns (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chiltern_Hills) Relatively near, though not very high


4

Snowshoes are available in the UK, but generally you have to go to more specialist mountaineering shops. I doubt any of the high street chains stock them, instead look at the smaller independent shops. Especially those shops located close to mountainous areas, where snowshoes could be more useful. eg Braemar Mountain Sports have a few models Icicle, in ...


4

The main areas for caving in the UK are: The Yorkshire Dales The Peak District South Wales The Mendip Hills (near Bristol) The North Pennines There are other, smaller areas as well, such as: Forest of Dean, Devon, Barrow in Furness, Assynt (in Scotland). The UK Caving WIKI has some more information on this. If you would like to get back into caving, ...


4

No you don't. We live in a small Swiss village of 380 inhabitants All the water we use comes from above the village as spring water This is piped to our house and to a village water trough (for animals and humans ) Tourists often ask to drink from our house because the idea of drinking from an outside water source is euuk (yes many are American) However ...


4

In addition to the good advice already offered in other answers: The national parks have websites offering you advice on safety - e.g. for Snowdonia, Dartmoor. Military 'live firing ranges' exist in some more remote parts of the UK such as Dartmoor. This means that the military use them for firing live ammunition (not blanks, actual explosives). Such areas ...


4

The UK has an incredibly high population density (262 people per km). This is one of the highest in the developed world. Though your correct there are higher,Holland has a higher one actually but they also have space issue, that's why the reclaim land using dykes, etc. The UK was also the birth place of the industrial revolution in the 1800-1900s and as ...


3

I bought a 1 lb bag of random foreign coins on eBay for $5. A cheap, neat little thing to find in a cache.


3

I have traveled the back country for 4-6 weeks a year for 30 years, mostly in the Canadian rockies and on the pre-cambrian shield. I've never used water purification, nor did we generally in our group. We've had some cases of the runs over the years, but the spread out nature made it unlikely it was a water source that did it. Far more likely bad hygiene ...


3

Although I have not found IUCN Level II protected areas, there do exist areas with a higher level than national parks. So, for are there at least areas with a protection level stricter than what UK National Parks have?, the answer is yes. Within England, there exist National Nature Reserves. According to Protected Planet, those are protected at IUCN level ...


2

Most of the time, if it's a public beach & you know how to build a bonfire & keep it under control, you should be fine. For example, a music festival in Whitby has had an unofficial beach bonfire twice a year & has had 1 visit from the Police in 20 years. They took a quick look at the fire, saw that it was being looked after by people who knew ...


2

Strictly, speaking you it is illegal to camp without the landowners permission. If you really want to be legal the best way is to ask a farmer if you can stay in a field. In reality, as long as you are sensible and don't camp right by a road or main path no one is likely to complain. As for where a Google search for wild camping in the brecon beacons ...


2

I remember buying in pharmacies a liquid prepared on the spot, from mint powder and saline solution (unfortunately this mix is sort of local-specific to our Romanian pharmacies, so I cannot provide a link). This was applied on mosquito bites and allergy rash - it stopped the itching for an hour or two. Based on this experience: try some sort of minty cream ...


1

After the prompt by Liam in the comments, I got in touch with the Forestry Commission via their website - it seems they list an email contact for each site. I received the following reply, confirming Joe's answer: The Nightjar (wooden bird) had been repaired over many years. However, the foundations had begun to rot beyond repair; it was with some ...



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