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1

A few others I could think of: Foxes Foxes are generally not aggressive are easily scared away by humans. However, there have been cases of fox attacks of on small children. It should be noted these incidents are very rare. Interestingly this appears to be more of an urban problem possibly caused by the close proximity between humans and foxes and the ...


5

Not sure how hazardous they are, but wasps, bees, hornets etc could spoil your trip in sufficient numbers or if you have an allergy to them. The NHS has a good page on biting/stinging insects, how to avoid them and what to do if you don't: 12 UK insects and bugs that bite or sting


14

In addition to the wildlife hazards mentioned in the other answers, swans and geese can be intimidating even if not highly hazardous - the adage about a swan's wing being able to break your arm is said to be just about true, but unlikely - and walkers occasionally report hostility or aggression from landowners who dispute their right to use a particular ...


6

In general the british isles are very safe. Most paths are well marked, dangerous areas are also marked off, and there are no large predators or other animals that are a serious threat to humans. Wildlife The other answer already covered this well. Essentially there are no animals in the British isles that are deliberately dangerous to you, although there ...


16

In the UK we have, comparative to other countries, very few venomous creatures. However the false widow and adders are still a risk. False widows have mostly been recorded in the South of England and Wales (though I've personally never seen one) but have been recorded to have bitten and hospitalise people, whilst this maybe when out and about it has also ...


3

The other answers address your question pretty well but I think you might have jumped in a bit head-first with your research and that maybe the question that you should be asking is "What's the best way of getting into kayaking" The best thing to do is go find your local club - it's by far the safest, cheapest, friendliest and most effective way of ...


3

I usually use trekking poles when walking and have been for over 20 years as it helps prevent knee injury so I would use them with a tarp. Since you want to use a dedicated pole for a tarp which is lightweight, you could have a look at this one http://www.backpackinglight.co.uk/shelter-accessories/WA114.html from a UK website dedicated to lightweight gear. ...


1

Many ultra light tents which use trekking poles as part of the framing offer the alternative of using carbon fiber poles (1-2oz), carbon fiber and fiberglass (1.8oz), or aluminium (4oz). I used one carbon fiber pole over a long period of time for the awning of my LightHeart Solo tent (they only sell aluminium now). In one of my first outing with the carbon ...



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