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6

The most obvious thing is an emergency blanket. It will add a lot of extra insulation per gram. It'a good to have one in you bag on any trip. However, a mere blanket is definitely not enough for all seasons, elevations and weather conditions. When planning at home, you should ask yourself a question: "What will happen to me if I have to be on the route ...


5

I always take a fist-sized SOL emergency bivy bag and a couple of strong black garbage bags. That way you can stuff food and even your body in the bags when conditions are cold and wet. I have also converted a garbage bag into a spare insulating clothing layer by tearing holes for arms and legs. Essential for climbers are a whistle for signalling and a ...


2

I think anaheim brought up a lot of good points, but I would choose a super light biwi bag that is able to keep you dry whether the humidity comes from the inside (sweat) or the outside (rain). If I take an insulation mat with me depends on existing possibilities to use it. If there are no pedestals you can lay or sit on, I would leave it at home.


2

The most pressing points are good ground insulation(mat to lie down on) wind protection and then dry clothes. We lose 80% of body heat through the ground. Evaporation of sweat or humid clothes cool at an extremely fast rate too. The amount of heat transfer depends on the evaporation rate, however for each kilogram of water vaporized 2,257 kJ of energy are ...


2

I used to sleep some times in the Belgium Ardennes which have a very mild climate. For size, weight and especially cost reasons I used agricultural black plastic (don't know the official English term). Advantages: light easy to pack very cheap easily layerable waterproof when not needed anymore (e.g. after last night or only night) you can throw it away ...



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