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10

If in doubt, double bag... put them in a sealed bag of your choice, then put them in another sealed bag with the open end (of the first bag) facing towards the closed end of the second bag, if the first leaks the second should catch it.


9

Your best bet is going to be small mylar pouches (any other thick plastic you can get your hands on will probably work just as well). They hold up much better than flimsy freezer bags and have a thick reassuring seal on the edge. You can get them resealable as shown, or you can weld non resealable bags closed. What you're really going for is something ...


8

When you start packing lighter, usually it comes with smaller margins of error. It seems that it is typically your case here. Basically, the first thing is to be more careful. It is a habit to take. For example, when you couldn't find information about whether there was deep wet snow or not, the decision of not taking the snowshoes was maybe arguable. ...


7

I do a lot of strength training when not backpacking, and try to keep my protein up around ~140 grams per day, on average. I asked a related question over on the fitness.stackexchange.com site, and at this point make all my own meals (usually with my dehydrator) because I find pre-made-hiker-food to be junk. The lightest protein source I know of is simply ...


6

I don't understand why you're so centric around protein. There are protein bars, some of which contain over 20g of protein. There are also freeze dried meats which is actually more protein dense(higher protien-weight ratio) than protein bars. Freeze dried foods generally offer the best weight to calorie ratio, because they have almost no water weight. Even ...


6

Out of some wonder, the peanut butter in our area comes in plastic jars, meaning that it is lighter than a normal jar. I save these plastic jars during the year and use them later on hikes. Also, in the local grocery stores I can buy some dairy products which come in plastic buckets and boxes (like this one, this or this) - I save these for trips and ...


6

I would probably use a small tupperware or similar, something like this. You can also get ones where the lid clips down which are probably more secure. If you are concerned about it leaking/coming open I would use some elastic bands to secure the lid and store it in a separate freezer bag to contain any leaks. Using a freezer bag as you suggest may work, ...


3

I'd cut my brush shorter long before I'd take the time to try drilling it. But If I was serious about going ultra light, I wouldn't pack a normal/modified toothbrush at all, I'd take a finger brush, either a reusable one: Or some disposable ones: I used to keep a couple brush-ups in my bag, they work ok, but honestly you could probably achieve the ...


3

GoToobs. They're food grade plastic, super light weight, and reusable.


3

Try Coghlan's Squeeze Tubes (available from REI) http://www.rei.com/product/696007/coghlans-squeeze-tubes-package-of-2 The base of the tube opens up so it's easy to fill and then closes securely. It's easy to squeeze the contents into your mouth, or on to crackers or other media for eating, without using utensils or trying to lick/scrape the gooey contents ...


2

In my experience, this is just an all-around difficult situation. Your clothes/boots getting soaked is inevitable. Even with gaiters and the most advanced moisture wicking technology, hike a day in the snow and you'll be really wet. Here's why: even if you're avoiding post-holing with snow shoes, the act of hiking in snow will raise your heart rate and get ...



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