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9

In your first example (a lost hiker firing shots into the air) at minimum a citation should be issued, firing into the air is a violation of basic gun safety; you don't know where that bullet is going to come back down. Consider also that most visitors to National Parks are unfamiliar with the area and the wildlife; there will be little sympathy for someone ...


6

There is a big difference between a 'non-profit' organisation and just doing something on a casual basis without asking for payment. Obviously if you are advertising your services in any way then there is a good chance that you would be considered to be a business regardless of whether you ask for payment. Note that in most jurisdictions charitable and ...


5

The robin should be quite capable of building the nest on her own. Almost anywhere there should be enough dried grass and small twigs around. It is unlikely your robin is having trouble finding building material. The best thing you can do for the robin family is to give them space. For your own enjoyment and perhaps that of others, you might install a ...


5

Throughout the entire US the law boils down to this: Whether government or citizen owned, you cannot travel on land without the landowners permission. Doing can result in charges from criminal trespass to much, much worse (in the case of some private government lands). So you'll need permission. In short, for each part of your journey. Find who owns ...


4

I think this question is hard if not impossible to answer on this SE format; after all we're outdoors men and women and not lawyers. I'd still like to offer some points, (though IANAL and don't even live in the US) as there are certainly several aspects to consider here: Legality I'm pretty sure what you're doing is perfectly legal, unless kayaking on the ...


4

This is one of those "it depends" answers. Based on my experience growing up in-part in America, with other Americans, going to camp: Size matters. Very big camps end up breaking people out in small groups, and the small groups (and entire large group) may not have award ceremonies. Setting matters. Is this a day camp or a sleep-away camp? How long have ...


4

There is no universal answer. Each property is managed separately, so the only real answer is you have to ask the management of each property that you intend to camp in. By separate property, I mean individual National Forests, for example, not the whole National Forest system. Within any one forest, there will likely be restrictions by location, time of ...


3

As to answer what areas may be more likely to allow backcountry camping, I usually look at the two following things. If you are unsure where to start, I would consider any long trails in the vicinity of where you want to backpack. Popular long trails, such as the AT, PCT & etc. allow you to camp mostly anywhere around the trail. There are some ...


3

We have one spot under our back deck where Robin's make a nest every year, last year we had a nest with five eggs: Every year, we did absolutely nothing to help them out, and they always did just fine. I did think that I could have helped a bit by giving them a couple worms when I poked my head in to take a look. Every time they'd hear something near by ...


3

I think this was most likely at least a two-creature job. That same sedum has been dug up, broken into pieces and strewn around my yard a number of times. (Pictures of some of the pieces were used in my answer to a question at Gardening and Landscaping, in case you want to see them.) After posting this question, we put up a motion light. The largest ...



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