Hot answers tagged

15

Without knowing the numbers using it, the signs are absolutely acceptable. The forest floor is very fragile, and although one foot print might not make a noticeable difference to most people (Having tracking training for SAR, I see the damage one person makes), 10 people will leave obvious damage, and 50 a trail. The problem is people walk off the main trail ...


13

It looks like a Burl. They are natural non-harmful (think of them like scar tissue maybe, resulting from injury or infection) deformities in the grain of trees. Both hardwood & softwood trees can develop burls. (FWIW, I'd guess based on the bark & needles laying in the folds of the bark in the first picture that this tree is some sort of conifer.)


9

I've hiked all over the USA and the general rule is that on public land, you can hike anywhere you want, unless there are specific rules for a given sensitive area. Generally these rules are posted at least at the trailhead or in any wilderness permit you get. The one place where there aren't posted signs, but that you should "STAY ON THE TRAIL" is making ...


8

Sugar maples, like other maples, flower in early spring. The flowers aren't very impressive. The leaves of sugar maple are usually fully expanded three to four weeks after the leaf buds begin to swell in the spring. The flowers emerge soon after the leaves and are in full bloom within a week. ...Fruits that result from flower pollination usually mature ...


7

Many people travel for days or weeks in bear country. Several existing questions on this site address bear and camp/food related issues. If you've never traveled in areas with bears before, you should definitely give these a read: What are the proper precautions/protocols for storing food while car camping in an area with bears? What precautions should I ...


6

You may like the look, but those trees are in the process of being killed by a nasty invasive, Oriental Bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus). It is one of the more common invasives in MA. There have been many things writting about this invasive. It's been on any list of invasive plants in MA that I've seen. Do a search and you'll see. DCR (MA Department ...


6

According to The Cornell Lab of Ornithology, American Robins are indeed found in wild places like woodlands, forests, and mountains. Because worms hibernate, the winter robins feed primarily on berries, found on trees and shrubs in the woods. The Ohio Division of Wildlife lists robins as native to Ohio. Some migrators travel through but there is a ...


6

Leave No Trace I grew up in a place that was surrounded by open wilderness. There are no, "stay on the trail rules" there. After spending a lot of time in Parks, where there are a lot of rules, and comparing them to growing up in the lawless wilderness, I have to admit that the Parks are a lot prettier. Visiting the wild trails and campgrounds from my youth ...


6

I haven't been diving/snorkeling in 10 years. But, back then I was looking at the U.S. Virgin Islands because the dive/travel websites and travel books I read told of nice snorkeling beaches on those Islands that were easily accessible and not crowded at all. Back then those islands were overlooked and not crowded. I never made it there. I'm not sure about ...


6

I'm not familiar with the Wichita refuge; my bison experience comes from the Yellowstone area. That said, I would never describe bison as being particularly "active": they spend most of their time either resting or grazing, with the herd slowly moving on to uneaten patches of grass. If you want to see bison running around, mating season (on the Wichita ...


6

Each species and possibly even each individual animal will behave very differently. A good rule of thumb is: if wildlife reacts to you, you are too close. I think this is the most general way to answer you question and has the benefit of giving you instantaneous feedback. If the animal looks straight at you, back off until it resumes what it was doing. The ...


6

You can get a weather forecast for Zion here. As you can see, daytime temps are about freezing or slightly above by night temps can drop pretty low. In my opinion camping in -10 to -15 C is pretty cold and you need to have the right gear, although its definitely possible. Obviously make sure you have suitably warm clothes, a decent tent and you'll probably ...


6

The National Weather Service offers a REST Web Service to provide forecast data in XML format. You can request forecast data using latitude and longitude, start and end dates, and forecast data element. If you have an DeLorme inReach satellite communicator, you're in luck as someone has already set up an experimental service to parse messages from it and ...


5

You might consider .. The C&O canal on the Maryland side of the Potomac starts in harpers ferry ( accessible by rail on Amtrak) and goes to Georgetown DC just past the Key bridge. The end is literally a 1 hour walk back to union station. It can be a week if you want. It is one of the greatest isolated bike paths in the world. until you get to ...


5

Possible culprits: Opossums: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6D-iFOsRhJ4 Raccoons: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tAG0V1AauJs Badgers: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xwrG_HdH2oY Foxes: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qPLJ0Gbu5D8 Porcupines: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A_yoCesDLhg Skunks: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hfrXnBMnNvg There ...


5

I think part of the answer to your question relates to WHERE in the Rockies you'll be visiting. Will you be in an area that is not visited much by humans, or will you be visiting a high-traffic area such as a national park or other popular tourist destination? If you will be hiking through an area that has few or sporadic hikers, then you really have ...


5

As to the OP's question: The answer is Most Probably Not. From http://www.ct.gov/deep/cwp/view.asp?a=2723&q=345000, a State of Connecticut publication on the Eastern Chipmunk: There is no difference in appearance between males and females. From How to tell if the Chipmunk is male or female •Pick your chipmunk up with your hands and place ...


4

I've certainly seen robins in woods (I'm in Scotland) but I've also noticed how much the populations of different bird species vary with location. There might just not be that many robins in your local woodland. Edit: American robins and European robins are apparently quite different. However, my comment above is probably still valid.


4

You don't see robins in the woods for the same reason you don't see prarie dogs there either; it's not their habitat. Notice that most of the time when you see a robin, it's hopping along the ground in some open space, or in a tree near some open space.


4

Bolbitius titubans Also known as Bolbitius vitellinus, that there looks to be a young Yellow Field Cap. They're quite small when they're yellow, but they quickly mature into taller, flatter, brownish mushroom.


4

Great Blue Herons don't seem to be territorial. Nesting sites usually have a few to a dozen nests at a time, sometimes three in the same tree. This is so common they are referred to as heron "rookeries". Except at the nest, it does appear that these birds work alone. Sometimes you can see two nearby, but not usually next to each other. Most of the time ...


4

Bears behave differently in places where they are used to a lot of human activity vs places where they are generally left alone. They learn and adapt. For example, in the Adirondacks in NY, bears have become adept at recognizing and grabbing human food from "bear bags" (food hung from a tree, theoretically out of reach on a limb that won't support the bear's ...


4

This is impossible to answer unless you are willing to do a enormous amount of research. There is no single, or even just a few, databases of trails in the US. The national trail lists generally only contain the larger multi-state trails (like the AT, PCT, etc) and some of the larger regional trails, but these are the tip of the iceberg. I'm guessing, but ...


4

Quick List: Mountain Lions Bobcats Coyotes Rattle Snakes Scorpions Feral Burros Feral Horses Desert Bighorn Sheep Black Widow Spiders Red Rock Canyon & Valley of Fire have very heavy human visitation, so any large predators are likely to be scarce (Mountain Lions & Bobcats). Coyotes are present, but unless cornered will not give you any ...


4

I've used HF/SSB radio aboard a sailboat in remote locations to receive weather GRIB (gridded binary) files of forecasts according to a model. You would subscribe to a service: Airmail or Sailmail (on a boat). The whole equipment set-up is complicated, heavy, needing a computer, 12v battery, antenna, radio, cables, etc. and wouldn't be sufficient for ...


4

Some areas of the world have a radio service (usually HF) that broadcasts weather on a schedule and allows you to check in daily. If close proximity to a marine area you may be able to pick up a scheduled marine VHF forecast (although it will be marine so the focus is different), Alternately, you could get a Ham license and schedule a hookup with an operator ...


3

Some of the things you've listed as precautions used in the US are not real or not reasonable. worry about the tent or shirt you sleep in smelling after food from 6 months ago This is silly. bear bells This is a joke. Using a bear canister, on the other hand, is reasonable and in fact legally required in some national parks in the US. But what ...


3

Animals are the least of your concerns at that altitude. I spend a lot of time at that elevation just on the other side of the border from Montana in Canada. Your elevation is less of a factor for animal encounters than what the weather is. Go hiking in the heat of the day and you will not see another living thing out on those rocks, because every critter ...


3

On the Ohio in Newburgh Indiana small boats enter and pull the rope for the signal bell. You must tie off before the lock master will begin closing the lock. There is no fee for pleasure boats and you will wait for the larger traffic.


3

If you do want to stay in the Michigan area, you might want to check out the North Country Trail . As a disclaimer, I've never done any of the sections in Michigan, but I the section I hiked in Pennsylvania/New York was really nice. There are thousands of miles in the trail, so you can't really get bored. There are some sections that are connected by roads ...



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