Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

18

The Dawn wall is one of the largest and most difficult climbs in the world, it's nearly 1000m of blankness, there isn't a lot to hold onto all the way up. But you're right, it has been "climbed" before. The Dawn wall was first climbed in 1970 by Warren Harding and Dean Caldwell. These climbers used a different technique to what Kevin Jorgeson and Tommy ...


14

Without knowing the numbers using it, the signs are absolutely acceptable. The forest floor is very fragile, and although one foot print might not make a noticeable difference to most people (Having tracking training for SAR, I see the damage one person makes), 10 people will leave obvious damage, and 50 a trail. The problem is people walk off the main trail ...


8

The US doesn't have anything like the Scandinavian right to roam (Swedish allemansrätten, etc.). Private land is usually fenced, and it's against the law to enter private land while hiking without the landowner's permission. The US term for wild camping is "backcountry camping" or "backpacking," as opposed to car camping, where you pay to park your car in a ...


8

Almost every emergency dispatch center has a non-emergency phone number. While services like Skype and Google Voice can't call 911 directly, you can look up "<region> non-emergency dispatch" and get a number with a local area code. Call them and tell them this is an emergency but you couldn't access 911. They will transfer you to an emergency ...


8

http://visitadirondacks.com/stay/campgrounds/backcountry-camping-rules-guidelines You only need a permit if your group is 10+ or you are staying in one location for more than 3 days. You don't need reservations for areas which allow primitive camping, but there are some campgrounds which require it. The Adirondacks are composed of a lot of areas with ...


7

I've hiked all over the USA and the general rule is that on public land, you can hike anywhere you want, unless there are specific rules for a given sensitive area. Generally these rules are posted at least at the trailhead or in any wilderness permit you get. The one place where there aren't posted signs, but that you should "STAY ON THE TRAIL" is making ...


6

What you want to do seems to be referred to by the Forest Service as "dispersed camping," and you can find a lot of information by googling on that phrase. Different jurisdictions seem to have different rules, but this blog post has a nice attempt to summarize how the rules usually work in national forests and on BLM land. Basically what they seem to want ...


6

As I understand it the permits have a couple of goals: It's a revenue stream to pay for the maintenance of the areas It's a way of controlling numbers It's a way of enforcing that the person with the permit has an understanding of the activity they are undertaking and has agreed to some kind of terms and conditions for said activity, it also means that if ...


6

In areas with quotas on permits, often only a certain percentage of permits can be reserved. The remainder are available on a first-come first-serve basis at the ranger station. For Mt Whitney, there is definitely a quota. There's likely to be a lot of competition to get a permit for such a popular trail at such a popular time of year. I would recommend ...


6

All 4 major carriers have either implemented or are implementing text-to-911 service. U.S. mobile providers commit to emergency texting service In the event that this doesn't work, you can always text a friend or family member. They can then call 911 for you. If they are in a different area, then they will be transferred to the correct area.


6

There is not a definitive guide for all locks, however most of the major locks in the US are run by the US Army Corps of Engineers, and they do not charge recreational boaters to pass through them. To my knowledge, all locks on the Upper Mississippi are accessible via paddling. As for the Ohio river, you can try calling McAlpine lock and dam, and they'll be ...


5

You don't mention any first-aid or survival items. I would include a first aid kit with maybe a compass and signaling mirror, maybe a firestarter of some kind. I would think that would add a negligible amount of weight to your rig.


5

As you specifically mentioned Southern Nevada Mojave Desert, if you come across a snake and considering the worst case its a venomous snake, then its very likely to be a Rattlesnake or a Side Winder or an Adder. The best way to avoid trouble with venomous reptiles is to be aware of your surroundings and observe some rules for your own safety. Most bites ...


5

A forecast should be posted daily at all ranger stations and visitor centers in the park. This will be the most reliable (i.e. not dependent on technology) way to get an up-to-date forecast. On the National Weather Service website, it says the following: The National Weather Service does not provide direct email/SMS alerts to the general public. ...


5

We used Outdoor/Indoor Protective Flooring interlocking Mats inside the tent ($20) (above ground sheet) insulates, soft enough to sleep on. Toddlers like this from experience (good for naps too) thermal rest (roller mat) $30 -$200 each depending on climate Baby can sleep with lots of cotton blankets wrapped up This mother blogs about it ...


5

For the US, an excellent starting point would be the Coast Guard's Aids to Navigation brochure; it explains all of the markers you are likely to encounter and provides a brief overview of the "rules of the road". The Coast Guard's Navigation Rules Online is an unofficial merger of the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (COLREGS) and ...


5

I don't have my copy of How to Survive in Avalanche Terrain in front of me, but one of the things that stood out to me relating to this is the wide variety of avalanche climates that exists not just from country to country but from mountain to mountain. You've got intermountain, continental, and maritime avalanche climates all with their own habits and ...


5

From an outdoor recreation point of view, is it relevant who manages a national monument? Yes! There are several resons why it's important who manages the land. For a start they control how the land is managed. Should it be farmed, should it be left to nature, should x area be allowed to flood or should we repair the dykes, etc., etc. This has a ...


5

Leave No Trace I grew up in a place that was surrounded by open wilderness. There are no, "stay on the trail rules" there. After spending a lot of time in Parks, where there are a lot of rules, and comparing them to growing up in the lawless wilderness, I have to admit that the Parks are a lot prettier. Visiting the wild trails and campgrounds from my youth ...


4

I'm fairly new to the Seattle area and have been attempting to plan my own early season trips, both for one day hikes and overnight backpacking. I'm certainly no expert, but here's my experience so far. I've been looking based on the following criteria, and using Washington Trails Association hike details and trip reports as a guide, as you mentioned: ...


4

I met a guy who left February 14th, the same day as I did, and he used a 40F Katabatic quilt the whole time. He slept with his down coat and gloves on. I didn't meet many people with 0F bags. I took a 0F Feathered Friends bag and was never uncomfortable. I swapped it out for a 35F bag in early May and had a few cold nights in Northern Virginia. Leaving ...


4

I'm no herpetologist, but in my experience, snakes are in the "you don't bug me, I won't bug you" category. If you're sitting in a blind and are still, you aren't likely to surprise them. Surprising a snake or making it feel endangered is what causes most bites. If you're still, they'll tend to just pass by without bothering you, and will likely detect you ...


4

No, it doesn't matter much. The regulations for what can be done in a national monument or park (the only difference between the two is that one is established by presidential edict, the other by act of congress) are pretty strict, so there won't be huge differences in what you are allowed to do in one national monument compared to another. That said, each ...


3

For a bare essential setup, you'll do just fine. You might want to consider: Better food selection Duct tape Emergency kit Light source Change the water containers Mini-carabiner Prefer non-canned goods because they are lighter, take less space and the resulting trash compacts better. You can find tuna packs too. You can roll duct tape on your poles or ...


3

I suspect you are bringing more items than you have listed, since you've alluded to some of them in the comments. That said, here's what I see as missing or improvable: Flashlight. Is that because you carry it on you? An LED microlight is quite small. Letting your eyes adapt to the dark often works, but sometimes more is needed. Kitchen gear. Are you ...


3

There are really no general principles. Some permits are free and self-issued: you pick up a form at the trailhead and fill it out. This is really more of a registration system, so that the authorities know who is out there, but it's still required. Example. Some permits are automatically issued to anyone who pays a fee, so it's really a way of ...


3

In general most buoys and navigational marks are informational. (There are some that could mark prohibited or restricted areas, but those are rare) Mostly they are of the “you are here” or “shallow water past this point” variety. The “you are here” type can be helpful if fog, rain etc. reduce visibility before you get back to shore. The “shallow water past ...


2

In Rock Hound State Park near Deming, Luna County, South-Western New Mexico, USA, you are allowed to collect rocks. This is highly unusual. I read it in various sources. The state park website seems very limited, but from the New Mexico Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources: It was established in 1966 as the first park in the United States that ...


2

Powered boats are typically expected to yield to non-powered boats such as your kayak, but that's not to say you shouldn't be aware of your surroundings, if not for your own safety then at least to be courteous. When I'm in a Kayak I tend to stay near the shore unless it's early morning or late evening when few other people are around, it's just easier for ...


2

The list of fish in that area is relatively easy to find, but the trick is identifying useful areas - the fishing trip websites don't give too much away. One useful place a friend told me about is between about 5 and 10 miles south of Friendship, northwest of Allen Island. This time of year you cam expect cod, pollock and halibut. Going further south you ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible