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15

Should I understand a water source to mean a spring/well, or any place where hikers may collect water (streams, lakes, etc.)? Yes. Any source of water - no matter how large or small - should be avoided when choosing a camp site. 100 meters is just a guideline, 200 meters is better. 200 meters and out of sight is great. The reasons are several-fold: ...


12

Roland Muser wrote a book, Long-Distance Hiking: Lessons from the Appalachian Trail, based on surveys of 136 long-distance hikers, each of whom spent 3-6 months on the trail. Some relevant quotes (p. 133): Two or three hikers had run-ins with local inhabitants, and some reported uncomfortable hitch-hiking incidents. More seriously, two hikers were ...


4

An additional point that hasn't been mentioned, is when you camp next to a creek or stream the water level can quickly change, sometimes by quite a bit. It can be sunny where you are camped but heavy rain miles upstream from you, and the raising water level could wash away half of your camp while you sleep.


4

As of today, several states have committed funding to open federal lands (mostly national parks) temporarily in their states. Utah has opened all of its national parks and some monuments operated by the NPS. Also, New York has paid to operate the Statue of Liberty park, Arizona has funded Grand Canyon National Park, and South Dakota is opening Mt. ...


4

Essentially, any places which has Federal staff will be shutdown and unaccessible including those which has a booth or paid access. Non-regulated public lands are not affected by the government shutdown. National parks are closed, including Yosemite. National Forests are still 'open' and so are state and county parks. Services are closed and people with ...


4

There are a couple of reasons for this, as I understand it: Your wastes (soap, Giardia in your poop, DEET, ...) will contaminate the water. Lakeshores in high-altitude areas tend to be very delicate. People do a lot of ecological damage by pitching their tents right there. Unlike high-altitude areas in the Alps, the ones in the western US do not have huts, ...


2

I realize you already made your trip, but I will answer your question anyhow. These tips are not regionally constrained to the Olympic Peninsula. 1) Footwear When setting out to wet places or in rainy weather always take a second pair of boots. In my experience from the army every shoe will let in water sooner or later under heavy rain. Always pack a couple ...


2

i can only agree to the answers, i was there and did a short hike (we just started like we would do here in switzerland) we're used to big and steep hikes without any trees giving shadow in the blazing sun. But the desert is dryer than you might think. Carry enough water and calculate more time than expected and you'll be fine, just don't try to jump ...


1

I think it depends very much on the area. In my area, it's very uncommon to encounter anyone once you get in more than a mile or two from the roads. Back there people are generally safer from other humans than they are in town. However, there is always the possibility and it is good to be prepared. Carrying pepper spray and/or a taser (depending on the ...



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