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28

When I was a boy I learned about a tribe of natives that had an initiation into manhood which involved plucking a hair from the tail of a live deer. These people had developed a mode of stealth that allowed them to walk right up to deer head on without the deer sensing their presence or noticing their advance. I adopted the technique for moving through the ...


24

You should run There's a good video from MinutePhysics that explains it all: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3MqYE2UuN24 The short(er) version is that the amount of water you "run into" depends only on the distance, which is equal whether you run or walk. But the water falling on top of your head depends on how long you stay in the rain, and you can ...


22

I found the best answer is tight underwear made from a slippery fabric with legs that extend just far enough down to cover where things rub in the crotch area. I currently have a pair of Underarmor brand that work very well. They are made of a stretchy but slick synthetic fabric. The garment stays in place on the skin. That means the skin doesn't get ...


21

The risk is that the blisters will get worse and worse, and continue to interfere with your hiking experience. They can get larger, more painful, and eventually tear open and risk getting infected. This process can happen fairly quickly - from the first time you notice pain in your feet, blisters can develop in < 15 minutes. I haven't personally tried ...


20

It depends in part on how you got the blisters, but from the question I think we can take it to mean that they're from friction. In order of what you can expect They will get worse and larger. They will pop. The friction that you haven't dealt with will continue. It is now rubbing on much softer skin. It will literally rub away skin (I've had this ...


20

After dealing with a lot of wet feet issues I have learned some tricks. Keeping feet dry While hiking, use gaitors that come above your socks and divert water away from the wicking material. Keep your boots well oiled, using a product like Nikwax, or minkoil. This keeps the leather from absorbing water as much. In normal conditions (not marsh hiking) use ...


20

You should walk. I have seen (and had) many 'accidents' from running in the rain - who hasn't? Although in theory running will keep you drier, there are more important things that staying dry. Running for the sake of staying drier is often done with little thought to the surroundings and potential consequences. You become goal focused - telling you ...


17

First of all, next time I'm in India I'm gunna give you a call so you can show me where that tunnel is. Second, the only real precaution you need to take is to ensure that in the event of a train encounter, that there is room for the train to pass by safely with you in the tunnel. I've actually been caught in train tunnel with a train coming the other way. ...


16

There are few things which may go wrong: Injury. Carry some kind of the shelter. It may take few hours for mountain rescue to get to your group. Tired. Make sure you have alternative shorter and simpler route in your head. Dehydrated. Carry a bit of extra water or a purification tablets to gather water from streams. Scared. Your rope can serve a good ...


16

Theoretically, run. Practically, slowly jog or briskly walk so that you don't slip and fall. The TV series MythBusters initially tested this with artificial rain and found that walking was better due to less surface area in the rain. However, after revisiting in actual rain, they found that running was better. Also, Lifehacker summed it up nicely: the ...


15

I wear my swimming trunks to the shower. My wife wears a pull over sun dress (light weight, thigh length). We wear our shower shoes, we carry our towels and shower supplies. We usually just take soap and shampoo. The soap is in a small plastic container. We wear the same clothing both ways. Dressing and other hygiene activities are done when we get back ...


14

The whole topic of sports equipment, sports health, and sports injuries is one in which the scientific quality of most of the information tends to be extremely poor. However, there is a group at Harvard that does research on barefoot running, and they have a web page with a lot of good information on it. As far as I've seen from browsing through their ...


14

In general every individual has a natural walking cadence (steps per minute) and they vary their actual speed by increasing or decreasing stride length. Even amongst a very fit group the most comfortable natural pace will vary and some people will be built for speed on the flat while some stroll up brutal hills others will happily carry their own bodyweight ...


12

I think your assumptions are correct. To my knowledge in a mountain environment you are quite safe as long as you follow some simple rules, which you mostly already named: The water was not standing, i.e. it comes from a stream that is rather fast and the stream is big enough that it is not just a connection of puddles or ponds where the water rinses ...


12

Ben Crowell already answered the "why minimalist" angle better than I could have, but he didn't specifically talk about Vibram FiveFingers (hereafter VFF). This is intended to complement his answer. Generic pros of minimalist footware Little or no heel drop. As with other (true) "minimalist" footwear the VFF have little or no heel drop. This works with ...


12

Does garlic balance your blood pressure on long walks? Garlic is proven to lower blood pressure. Not balance it. Though this study also suggests that the this reduction was not large enough to be statistically significant. So no garlic does not balance blood pressure, neither does it (scientifically) lower it a significant amount. Overall, they found ...


12

In most parts of the world going through a working train tunnel on foot is illegal, in all parts of the world it verges on suicidal. I can imagine there are places in the world where, there are no other reasonable options. In this case, in addition to common sense items required for walking in a dark tunnel. Get a rail schedule, and do research to ...


11

The only real way to stop erosion is of course not to walk on them at all - but that's not really a viable solution per se! Realistically, I'd stick to the marked, worn path. Most people will do that anyway, so you'll be treading on well worn ground which has two main advantages over trudging elsewhere: The organisation responsible for maintaining such ...


11

You can prevent this by getting some talcum powder (baby powder) and putting it where you usually get the rash. Depending on how much you're sweating, apply it every few hours. Also wear tight and long underwear so you minimize the friction, it's certainly the cheapest solution. Give it a try, I had some "horror" hikes because of that, it just messes up ...


11

A trek group should have a Leader who walks in front who leads the trail/route/climb, sometimes cleaning the route or navigating the route. I believe that will be you. Then the second most important person is the Back Lead, who is the last head you have, who makes sure that the pace of the group is maintained and adapted as per the slowest member. You'll ...


11

Apparently it was removed due to lack of funding for repairs. Here's a link to an article about it. Here's a link to a picture for the curious. Too bad.


10

I will share what I know about Blisters and what I could do to suffer least from them. Blisters are mainly due to wetness, let it be through Actual wet shoes and socks, or let them be due to Sweat. These are the few things that I follow and since I have started doing those things, I have managed to make the suffering too far less frequent, even if I trek for ...


10

You may be fighting an uphill battle, and may have a fungal infection. That was the case for me, which made it very hard to keep from getting rashes when backpacking/camping, or really, going anywhere without being able to shower daily. I went to the doctor and had them prescribe me an anti-fungal medicine, which was Tolnaftate, the active ingredient in ...


10

This may seem kind of obvious, but I use a scanning technique. I like to look at the next 10-20 feet, look up on all sides, look down, and then look up. It's a lot like driving, scan your mirrors, then your environment, then your dash or whatever you need to, and then repeat. It does take mental purpose, so you will have to train yourself. I like to scan ...


10

It's quite simple really. If the railway is abandoned, bring an LED headlamp and a set of backup batteries. Edit: Use the buddy system if you can. If the railway is not abandoned, don't step foot into that tunnel. That's a sure way to risk being killed.


9

Carry extra socks and a couple of kitchen-sized trash bags. When you soak a shoe or boot, squeeze out the wet sock and let it start drying on the back of the pack. Put on a dry sock. Then put the trash back over the dry sock, and put your foot, sock, and trash bag inside your wet shoe. After a while your shoe will dry out a little, maybe enough that you no ...


9

Whatever you do, the membrane will wear out in a few years. That's one of the reasons why many people prefer leather boots, because once the membrane starts to leak, they can still waterproof the leather (it's much harder to perfectly waterproof textile). That said, you can always try to keep the membrane as long as possible. One thing manufacturers ...


9

Could be two I'd guess: Labyrinth spider It's hard to completly identify but by the sound of the web shape and your description it is most likely a Labyrinth spider More info here At this time of the year, the funnel webs in our gardens are normally the work of Labyrinth spiders. Labyrinths are common, shy little critters, and being a dull grey-...


9

Here is a pretty useful article on the correct way to use poles. There are several aims in using a pole. In my opinion, the primary one is to reduce strain on the knees and ankles. Additionally they provide extra stability on rough ground and can make going uphill easier. The disadvantage is they result in extra weight and may increase total energy ...


9

The more common term is "mining bees". As the name says, they build nests underground, usually in sandy ground. The other big difference between them and regular honey bees, is that they are so-called solitary bees, so they do not form hives. The nest is built by a single female, who lays eggs in several chambers and provides each with pollen and nectar. So ...



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