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17

After dealing with a lot of wet feet issues I have learned some tricks. Keeping feet dry While hiking, use gaitors that come above your socks and divert water away from the wicking material. Keep your boots well oiled, using a product like Nikwax, or minkoil. This keeps the leather from absorbing water as much. In normal conditions (not marsh hiking) use ...


14

There are few things which may go wrong: Injury. Carry some kind of the shelter. It may take few hours for mountain rescue to get to your group. Tired. Make sure you have alternative shorter and simpler route in your head. Dehydrated. Carry a bit of extra water or a purification tablets to gather water from streams. Scared. Your rope can serve a good ...


11

The whole topic of sports equipment, sports health, and sports injuries is one in which the scientific quality of most of the information tends to be extremely poor. However, there is a group at Harvard that does research on barefoot running, and they have a web page with a lot of good information on it. As far as I've seen from browsing through their ...


11

A trek group should have a Leader who walks in front who leads the trail/route/climb, sometimes cleaning the route or navigating the route. I believe that will be you. Then the second most important person is the Back Lead, who is the last head you have, who makes sure that the pace of the group is maintained and adapted as per the slowest member. You'll ...


10

The only real way to stop erosion is of course not to walk on them at all - but that's not really a viable solution per se! Realistically, I'd stick to the marked, worn path. Most people will do that anyway, so you'll be treading on well worn ground which has two main advantages over trudging elsewhere: The organisation responsible for maintaining such ...


8

The bottom line is there is always SOME risk. Whether to take that risk or not is your choice. Fast running + isolated + high elevation = prettttty low risk. With that said the biggest concern is, unless you are drinking right from the source, you have no idea what has happened upstream from you. There could be a dead animal snagged in the stream, animal ...


8

I think your assumptions are correct. To my knowledge in a mountain environment you are quite safe as long as you follow some simple rules, which you mostly already named: The water was not standing, i.e. it comes from a stream that is rather fast and the stream is big enough that it is not just a connection of puddles or ponds where the water rinses ...


8

Ben Crowell already answered the "why minimalist" angle better than I could have, but he didn't specifically talk about Vibram FiveFingers (hereafter VFF). This is intended to complement his answer. Generic pros of minimalist footware Little or no heel drop. As with other (true) "minimalist" footwear the VFF have little or no heel drop. This works with ...


8

Here are two pretty useful articles on the correct way to use poles: one shortish one and one longer quite comprehensive one. There are several aims in using a pole. Primarily (IMHO) is to reduce strain on the knees/ankles. Additionally they they provide extra stability on rough ground and can make going uphill easier. The disadvantage is they result in ...


7

Whatever you do, the membrane will wear out in a few years. That's one of the reasons why many people prefer leather boots, because once the membrane starts to leak, they can still waterproof the leather (it's much harder to perfectly waterproof textile). That said, you can always try to keep the membrane as long as possible. One thing manufacturers ...


7

Could be two I'd guess: Labyrinth spider It's hard to completly identify but by the sound of the web shape and your description it is most likely a Labyrinth spider More info here At this time of the year, the funnel webs in our gardens are normally the work of Labyrinth spiders. Labyrinths are common, shy little critters, and being a dull ...


7

As Jim alluded to, you need to be very explicit about gear. I've taken groups of 2-6 very inexperienced people on assorted trips, from strenuous dayhikes to backpacking trips. Here's things I usually make sure to include: Be very strict about no cotton clothing, and explain why. People may show up with cotton sweatshirts when they really need a fleece ...


6

Carry extra socks and a couple of kitchen-sized trash bags. When you soak a shoe or boot, squeeze out the wet sock and let it start drying on the back of the pack. Put on a dry sock. Then put the trash back over the dry sock, and put your foot, sock, and trash bag inside your wet shoe. After a while your shoe will dry out a little, maybe enough that you no ...


6

This is one of the reasons I always hike with at least one extra pair of socks and tend to wear shoes that shed water quickly as opposed to being water proof. If you're in a consistently wet environment there really isn't much you can do as it won't really help to change your socks every 10 minutes as they keep getting soaked. Just make sure that when you ...


6

Maybe? It may depend on where you're getting the blisters. A lot of the blisters that I get from hiking boots are on my heels, or on the sides of my toes. I don't think that barefoot walking would help build calluses in those places. If you want to walk barefoot, go ahead an experiment with that. But I'd also look at the general advice for avoid ...


6

Blisters are more frequent between the toes than Anywhere on the bottom of the feet. And, with heavy trekking shoes, you are most likely to sustain blisters around toes and between them, so I guess as the above guy (theJollySin) said walking barefoot wont help much with blisters, But yeah it does help you to Harden your skin, make your ankle recover from any ...


6

Try running on sand for your morning or evening run - sand is very good at early stages of toughening up your feet as it still spreads the load well. Once you have toughened the skin a bit, you will be able to walk on forest trails, stone, gravel etc. But for now, the best thing you can do is moisturise your feet - this helps the cracks smooth out so they ...


5

Whilst I have no direct experience, garlic tablets can lower blood pressure, a clove of garlic itself will not have much of an impact unless you eat a lot of it. Other options are Cayenne Pepper, Green Tea and foods with a high vitamin C level. If you need to raise your blood pressure then keep hydrated and your salt levels up. Fresh fruits with vitamin B ...


5

Does garlic balance your blood pressure on long walks? Garlic is proven to lower blood pressure. Not balance it. Though this study also suggests that the this reduction was not large enough to be statistically significant. So no garlic does not balance blood pressure, neither does it (scientifically) lower it a significant amount. Overall, they ...


5

You have outlined a couple of assumptions in your question which there is no evidence for. Back in prehistory, people did what they needed to do to survive, and that often wasn't very long. One thing they didn't do, as far as the evidence suggests, is any extra exercise - there was no need for fitness clubs, as they were spending most of there time ...


5

Four possible ways to work upper body muscles harder Pack heavily Walking, even a casual stroll, is work for core torso muscles. More weight and more strenuous walking will make these muscles work harder. When in doubt, pack it. Carry extra water, extra food, extra clothes. Instead of energy bars, pack a a can of soup and a stove. You can enjoy a hot ...


4

It is my understanding that the Nordic or Exercise Poles are for walking fast and the grip is designed to release quickly forward in stride with a glove like fit and usually have either a rubber or paw type tip. The Trekking or Hiking poles are designed for pushing slightly down on to take pressure off of your lower body with a lighter thinner strap and have ...


4

If you really do need exceptional accuracy, you could use the solution many Ingress players use - a good Android phone with a battery pack. In the game you often need accuracy of 2 or 3 metres - so the Galaxy S3 or a phone paired with the Nexus 7 (which has an excellend GPS) are the tools of choice. The game uses google maps and wireless navigation, as well ...


4

The Gore-Tex trail shoes I'm wearing right now have the Gore-Tex layer on the inside (between my socks and the outer suede/synthetic). I'm not sure that you can do anything to fix that layer once it is worn out. I would make sure you clean mud off your boots as soon as you can (usually once you get home from a hiking trip). If you have leather boots, then ...


4

We are all different and this problem is nothing rare. What you are describing is called overpronation, which means that you roll more on the inside of your foot when you walk. This is something that is rooted in your pattern of movement, i.e something that is very hard to change. The best way to remedy this would be to add some kind of padding to your ...


4

Here are a few items that I find easy to pack, and are usually needed by at least a few people in a group: ziplock bags for waterproofing valuables unscented baby wipes for a quick personal cleaning ibuprofen or acetaminophen for minor aches and pain 3M "transpore" medical tape adheres well to skin in wet conditions hard candies always provide a morale ...


3

Spain is mediocre when it comes to topographic maps. Certainly beats Italy, but you won't find the quality of France, Switzerland, Germany, or northern Europe. They're not too old — you can find maps less than 10 years old in the new digital series, at scales down to 1:25,000. In general, what's on the map exists and is accurate. Unfortunately: most ...


3

I have traveled the back country for 4-6 weeks a year for 30 years, mostly in the Canadian rockies and on the pre-cambrian shield. I've never used water purification, nor did we generally in our group. We've had some cases of the runs over the years, but the spread out nature made it unlikely it was a water source that did it. Far more likely bad hygiene ...


3

No you don't. We live in a small Swiss village of 380 inhabitants All the water we use comes from above the village as spring water This is piped to our house and to a village water trough (for animals and humans ) Tourists often ask to drink from our house because the idea of drinking from an outside water source is euuk (yes many are American) However ...


3

know if you will be going through marshy areas. If you are hiking in the Everglades, pack more socks than if you will be hiking through the Sahara. If you have to cross a river, try to not cross in your boots. There is a favorite trail in my area, and it ends with crossing a waist-deep river. I'll drop pack, change into my trail-sandals, stuff the socks ...



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