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24

You should run There's a good video from MinutePhysics that explains it all: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3MqYE2UuN24 The short(er) version is that the amount of water you "run into" depends only on the distance, which is equal whether you run or walk. But the water falling on top of your head depends on how long you stay in the rain, and you can ...


20

You should walk. I have seen (and had) many 'accidents' from running in the rain - who hasn't? Although in theory running will keep you drier, there are more important things that staying dry. Running for the sake of staying drier is often done with little thought to the surroundings and potential consequences. You become goal focused - telling you ...


17

First of all, next time I'm in India I'm gunna give you a call so you can show me where that tunnel is. Second, the only real precaution you need to take is to ensure that in the event of a train encounter, that there is room for the train to pass by safely with you in the tunnel. I've actually been caught in train tunnel with a train coming the other way. ...


16

Theoretically, run. Practically, slowly jog or briskly walk so that you don't slip and fall. The TV series MythBusters initially tested this with artificial rain and found that walking was better due to less surface area in the rain. However, after revisiting in actual rain, they found that running was better. Also, Lifehacker summed it up nicely: the ...


15

I wear my swimming trunks to the shower. My wife wears a pull over sun dress (light weight, thigh length). We wear our shower shoes, we carry our towels and shower supplies. We usually just take soap and shampoo. The soap is in a small plastic container. We wear the same clothing both ways. Dressing and other hygiene activities are done when we get back ...


14

In general every individual has a natural walking cadence (steps per minute) and they vary their actual speed by increasing or decreasing stride length. Even amongst a very fit group the most comfortable natural pace will vary and some people will be built for speed on the flat while some stroll up brutal hills others will happily carry their own bodyweight ...


12

In most parts of the world going through a working train tunnel on foot is illegal, in all parts of the world it verges on suicidal. I can imagine there are places in the world where, there are no other reasonable options. In this case, in addition to common sense items required for walking in a dark tunnel. Get a rail schedule, and do research to ...


10

It's quite simple really. If the railway is abandoned, bring an LED headlamp and a set of backup batteries. Edit: Use the buddy system if you can. If the railway is not abandoned, don't step foot into that tunnel. That's a sure way to risk being killed.


9

This will be very country and even camp ground specific. Least likely to offend approach is to do what most of the others do. If just one person is doing what you want, don't presume its acceptable, wait till you have seen several people doing it. If everyone is getting dressed to go to showers (unlikely), get dressed. In the unlikely even most people ...


8

Stay hydrated. Dehydration prolongs the time it takes to recover from exertion. Eat. Make sure you bring enough and the right kind of food for the trip to adequately fuel your body. Sleep. Make sure you didn't skimp on sleep, just to get that extra early start. Prepare your body. Go on long hikes or runs back to back in the weeks/months leading up to your ...


8

I've owned pairs of both Keen and Ecco sandals, and have been quite happy with both. They each have solid leather construction with comfortable padding on the inside, and they tend to hold up well. The sandals are cut so that water flows out of them quickly. The down side is that this allows gravel and sand into the sandals as well. If you're in the ...


7

I hike a lot in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, and around here our 'book time' is based off of a book called the White Mountain Guide. It assumes that you will take half an hour for each horizontal mile and each 1,000 feet of elevation gain, so a 10 mile, 3,000 foot hike would take 6:30 by book time. This number can be useful for planning purposes, ...


7

It also depends on your type of clothes. Wearing "non breathable" clothes will get you more sweaty than the rain will get you wet sometimes. Also if you wear a coat but no rainproof trousers, than running will probably get your trousers more wet, because of surface area increase. I think the best tactic can be seen by observing people in rain: Those ...


7

I guess the answer really is It depends As a general purpose solution I normally bring sturdy trekking/hiking sandals on my trips. Something like the models from Teva for example (many pictures on Google). I specifically look for models with have sturdy rubber soles with good profiles, and which come with velcro straps that I can fasten/adjust quickly and ...


6

It is illegal to wild camp in England outside of Dartmoor. A lot of our woodlands are privately owned. It maybe relaxed in places, as in, people get away with it, but you might find that harder down near London. You may need permission to wild camp some areas. However... for forests near London to visit you could have a look at Epping Forest, it sits ...


6

Your goals should be to: Recuperate as fast as possible and prevent injury Replenish your energy reserves as best you can Rest So stretch and stretch well (even if your exhausted). I recently did a long distance walk and I was too tired to stretch in the evening. Worst decision I've ever made. I woke up after about an hour of sleep, I thought I'd torn my ...


6

It depends on the amount of rain and on the surface you are running/walking on. Now, there is unquestionably a threshold where the amount of rain makes the time exposure factor so significant that running wins without any doubt. However for lighter rain there might be another factor that turns the result. I remember reading a news paper article about ...


6

You may like the look, but those trees are in the process of being killed by a nasty invasive, Oriental Bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus). It is one of the more common invasives in MA. There have been many things writting about this invasive. It's been on any list of invasive plants in MA that I've seen. Do a search and you'll see. DCR (MA Department ...


6

Any kayaking shop will have a selection of both shoes and boots designed for this. While you can get them with thin soles, I recommend thicker soles if you're mainly wearing them on rocky river beds and banks. You'll get a range of weights and prices. Neoprene dive boots are also an option though they tend to be heavier. For a (possibly) cheap option, ...


6

Merrell make several excellent shoes which are designed to be lightweight running shoes and I believe they would fit your use case neatly. Unlike sandals they offer a fully enclosed toe for greater protection, with synthetic and mesh upper and drainage ports in the sole. They're often designed to be worn sockless and so fit the foot closely to minimise ...


6

I often use Bikemap.net, not only for bike trails, but also for hikes: has really good maps and also nice route planning functions; you can save your maps to be available offline, and then track them on your smartphone. Or you can print the detailed maps, frame by frame. The Bikemap page took me to Wandermap.net which also seems to be useful, but I somehow ...


6

I've been camping in the UK for many years and the generally people either get fully dressed before heading to the shower, or walk over in pajamas/ dressing gown.


5

One trick not yet mentioned, but surprisingly efficient: When I start sweating in this area (and I'm out in the woods where I won't meet a lot of people) I usually just open the zipper on my pants. This helps wonders to boost air circulation, thus preventing sweating. For me this also 100% prevents the hiking rashes. Sometimes I walk for an hour like that, ...


5

Having spent a lot of time running and walking in the rain I can say from experience that it's very much an individual specific choice. Personally I like to keep my body temperature up as I find it difficult to do so whilst walking; so I have to run. I'm reasonably fit so can run for an hour if need be, but others might not be, and for them it could be ...


5

If you are only going to use them to cross rivers and you are wanting to save on weight / space, I would suggest some neoprene booties. Surf or diving booties will do just fine. Some are like a neoprene sock, you will get a hole in these fairly quickly. Some are more substantial and are like a neoprene sock with a rubber sole. I would suggest you get a ...


5

You have a wonderful goal! It is good that you understand it can take time to work up to this trip. I recommend that you think in terms of several years, not decades, because (a) after 50, most people don't get better physically, they just manage not to get worse and (b) unexpected things happen. As for what kind of physical and spiritual training ...


4

Fishermen use felt soled wading boots for wading through creeks and rivers on the slippery rocks, they give you the friction you need without damaging the surface you're walking on. They would work just as well on a slippery dock. You can buy them at any fishing store.


4

I would treat this exactly like walking on ice: use the penguin technique, i.e. always keep your center of mass above your feet and take small slow steps. Also see What's the best way to avoid slipping on ice?


4

I would suggest walking with flat feet rather than the usual rolling foot technique most people walk with. This means that rather than landing with your heel 1st and rolling onto the ball of your foot, you should walk in such a way that your whole foot contacts the ground at the same time. This should keep you upright on flat ground. You will also notice ...


4

I was searching in relation to this question and found the following which I thought was interesting. It seems to be common to walk along these tracks, but I don't know what the legality of it is. Dudhsagar Falls (switch between "Map" and "Earth" views to see where the tracks are if you need help) Here's an article about an adventure a group of people had:...



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