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24

You should run There's a good video from MinutePhysics that explains it all: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3MqYE2UuN24 The short(er) version is that the amount of water you "run into" depends only on the distance, which is equal whether you run or walk. But the water falling on top of your head depends on how long you stay in the rain, and you can ...


20

You should walk. I have seen (and had) many 'accidents' from running in the rain - who hasn't? Although in theory running will keep you drier, there are more important things that staying dry. Running for the sake of staying drier is often done with little thought to the surroundings and potential consequences. You become goal focused - telling you ...


17

First of all, next time I'm in India I'm gunna give you a call so you can show me where that tunnel is. Second, the only real precaution you need to take is to ensure that in the event of a train encounter, that there is room for the train to pass by safely with you in the tunnel. I've actually been caught in train tunnel with a train coming the other way. ...


16

Theoretically, run. Practically, slowly jog or briskly walk so that you don't slip and fall. The TV series MythBusters initially tested this with artificial rain and found that walking was better due to less surface area in the rain. However, after revisiting in actual rain, they found that running was better. Also, Lifehacker summed it up nicely: the ...


13

In general every individual has a natural walking cadence (steps per minute) and they vary their actual speed by increasing or decreasing stride length. Even amongst a very fit group the most comfortable natural pace will vary and some people will be built for speed on the flat while some stroll up brutal hills others will happily carry their own bodyweight ...


11

In most parts of the world going through a working train tunnel on foot is illegal, in all parts of the world it verges on suicidal. I can imagine there are places in the world where, there are no other reasonable options. In this case, in addition to common sense items required for walking in a dark tunnel. Get a rail schedule, and do research to ...


10

It's quite simple really. If the railway is abandoned, bring an LED headlamp and a set of backup batteries. Edit: Use the buddy system if you can. If the railway is not abandoned, don't step foot into that tunnel. That's a sure way to risk being killed.


10

This may seem kind of obvious, but I use a scanning technique. I like to look at the next 10-20 feet, look up on all sides, look down, and then look up. It's a lot like driving, scan your mirrors, then your environment, then your dash or whatever you need to, and then repeat. It does take mental purpose, so you will have to train yourself. I like to scan ...


9

wild camping in the UK is a gray area. Technically it is illegal to wild camp anywhere (Scotland and Dartmoor are the exceptions it is actually legal to wild camp in any unenclosed area there). Practically though, wild camping is tolerated in most wild areas (unenclosed remote areas like the breacon's). You need to be careful though and obey some simple ...


8

Pneumonia is not what you have to be worried about in this situation. It is a serious pathologic condition of the lungs commonly (but not exclusively) cause by viral or bacterial infection. Unless you were previously infected it is not likely to catch anything away from civilization. There is a widespread notion of a relation between being cold and catching ...


8

The more common term is "mining bees". As the name says, they build nests underground, usually in sandy ground. The other big difference between them and regular honey bees, is that they are so-called solitary bees, so they do not form hives. The nest is built by a single female, who lays eggs in several chambers and provides each with pollen and nectar. So ...


8

Stay hydrated. Dehydration prolongs the time it takes to recover from exertion. Eat. Make sure you bring enough and the right kind of food for the trip to adequately fuel your body. Sleep. Make sure you didn't skimp on sleep, just to get that extra early start. Prepare your body. Go on long hikes or runs back to back in the weeks/months leading up to your ...


7

Reaching for my Kindle copy of House and Johnston's book*, I find the statement: "In an ideal world we’d eat seventy grams of carbohydrate per hour to replace the roughly 400–800 calories per hour we’re burning while climbing." Obviously at 4 calories/gram, 70g of carbs will not supply 400-800 calories. The reasoning for this amount becomes more clear ...


7

I hike a lot in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, and around here our 'book time' is based off of a book called the White Mountain Guide. It assumes that you will take half an hour for each horizontal mile and each 1,000 feet of elevation gain, so a 10 mile, 3,000 foot hike would take 6:30 by book time. This number can be useful for planning purposes, ...


7

It also depends on your type of clothes. Wearing "non breathable" clothes will get you more sweaty than the rain will get you wet sometimes. Also if you wear a coat but no rainproof trousers, than running will probably get your trousers more wet, because of surface area increase. I think the best tactic can be seen by observing people in rain: Those ...


6

You may like the look, but those trees are in the process of being killed by a nasty invasive, Oriental Bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus). It is one of the more common invasives in MA. There have been many things writting about this invasive. It's been on any list of invasive plants in MA that I've seen. Do a search and you'll see. DCR (MA Department ...


6

It depends on the amount of rain and on the surface you are running/walking on. Now, there is unquestionably a threshold where the amount of rain makes the time exposure factor so significant that running wins without any doubt. However for lighter rain there might be another factor that turns the result. I remember reading a news paper article about ...


6

Your goals should be to: Recuperate as fast as possible and prevent injury Replenish your energy reserves as best you can Rest So stretch and stretch well (even if your exhausted). I recently did a long distance walk and I was too tired to stretch in the evening. Worst decision I've ever made. I woke up after about an hour of sleep, I thought I'd torn my ...


6

It is illegal to wild camp in England outside of Dartmoor. A lot of our woodlands are privately owned. It maybe relaxed in places, as in, people get away with it, but you might find that harder down near London. You may need permission to wild camp some areas. However... for forests near London to visit you could have a look at Epping Forest, it sits ...


5

One trick not yet mentioned, but surprisingly efficient: When I start sweating in this area (and I'm out in the woods where I won't meet a lot of people) I usually just open the zipper on my pants. This helps wonders to boost air circulation, thus preventing sweating. For me this also 100% prevents the hiking rashes. Sometimes I walk for an hour like that, ...


5

I am presuming this is not a hypothetical survival situation and it can be planned for. I used to regularly walked in wet boots for days, often in near (although rarely below) 0 degree temperatures, although pass hopping we could spend most of a day above the snow line with wet boots. A typical week to 10 day trip where I live you will cross a river ...


5

I find this is something I do when I can't see much of the scene in front of me at once. This is normally because I'm not far from the person in front of me. Therefore, my advice is: walk in front. Or, leave a big gap between you and the person in front of you. This is perhaps somewhat antisocial, but personally I quite like to walk alone about half the ...


5

Having spent a lot of time running and walking in the rain I can say from experience that it's very much an individual specific choice. Personally I like to keep my body temperature up as I find it difficult to do so whilst walking; so I have to run. I'm reasonably fit so can run for an hour if need be, but others might not be, and for them it could be ...


5

I've owned pairs of both Keen and Ecco sandals, and have been quite happy with both. They each have solid leather construction with comfortable padding on the inside, and they tend to hold up well. The sandals are cut so that water flows out of them quickly. The down side is that this allows gravel and sand into the sandals as well. If you're in the ...


4

I would suggest walking with flat feet rather than the usual rolling foot technique most people walk with. This means that rather than landing with your heel 1st and rolling onto the ball of your foot, you should walk in such a way that your whole foot contacts the ground at the same time. This should keep you upright on flat ground. You will also notice ...


4

I was searching in relation to this question and found the following which I thought was interesting. It seems to be common to walk along these tracks, but I don't know what the legality of it is. Dudhsagar Falls (switch between "Map" and "Earth" views to see where the tracks are if you need help) Here's an article about an adventure a group of people ...


4

It depends on training and the ability to survive the training. It also depends on the load you are carrying. After disembarking from ships at San Carlos on East Falkland, on 21 May 1982, Royal Marines and members of the Parachute Regiment yomped (and tabbed) with their equipment across the islands, covering 56 miles (90 km) in three days carrying ...


4

Bolbitius titubans Also known as Bolbitius vitellinus, that there looks to be a young Yellow Field Cap. They're quite small when they're yellow, but they quickly mature into taller, flatter, brownish mushroom.


4

The trick to be able memorize the immediate trail ahead of you and pick your footfalls several steps before you get to them. It's the same as offroad driving. You can't see over your hood, and hanging out your window only lets you see one side of your vehicle. You have to memorize the features on the ground ahead and know where your wheels are so you can ...


4

I hike with my feet slightly turned upwards against the direction they are moving. This prevents stubbing or anything abrupt and lets me get a firm grip on the firmament whether I see it or not. Also, after some thought, I tend to place my foot from the back-outside to front-inside and let it settle a bit until I feel it catch and then apply weight; for ...



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