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2

seems to me if you're hiking for distance, then watching where you're going is really important; but if you're there to see, listen, smell, etc., just slow down. Animals don't move quickly, they pause, look around, smell, listen, then move on. Birds are always looking around for threats & food. Slowing down is good- you may not cover a lot of ground, but ...


0

Ha ha. You can't. At least not off a leveled surface. I've struggled with this too. If I look down I miss the views; if I look up I trip. So I look ahead for a place to stop and enjoy. Then I march on, eyes on the rocks and detritus in the trail, until I reach my looky place.


4

The trick to be able memorize the immediate trail ahead of you and pick your footfalls several steps before you get to them. It's the same as offroad driving. You can't see over your hood, and hanging out your window only lets you see one side of your vehicle. You have to memorize the features on the ground ahead and know where your wheels are so you can ...


4

I hike with my feet slightly turned upwards against the direction they are moving. This prevents stubbing or anything abrupt and lets me get a firm grip on the firmament whether I see it or not. Also, after some thought, I tend to place my foot from the back-outside to front-inside and let it settle a bit until I feel it catch and then apply weight; for ...


5

I find this is something I do when I can't see much of the scene in front of me at once. This is normally because I'm not far from the person in front of me. Therefore, my advice is: walk in front. Or, leave a big gap between you and the person in front of you. This is perhaps somewhat antisocial, but personally I quite like to walk alone about half the ...


10

This may seem kind of obvious, but I use a scanning technique. I like to look at the next 10-20 feet, look up on all sides, look down, and then look up. It's a lot like driving, scan your mirrors, then your environment, then your dash or whatever you need to, and then repeat. It does take mental purpose, so you will have to train yourself. I like to scan ...


7

The more common term is "mining bees". As the name says, they build nests underground, usually in sandy ground. The other big difference between them and regular honey bees, is that they are so-called solitary bees, so they do not form hives. The nest is built by a single female, who lays eggs in several chambers and provides each with pollen and nectar. So ...



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