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9

When washing in the backcountry there are some techniques and considerations that will benefit yourself and the pristine wilderness you are traveling within. Don't ever wash near a water source, you are contaminating it for yourself, everyone else, and the animals that drink from it. 1. Always carry water at least 500 feet away from: The source of the ...


8

Some methods Alcohol, either hand sanitizer or rubbing alcohol with a microfiber towel to have a "bath" Advantages: Lightweight, fast. Disadvantages: Dries your skin, have to carry the alcohol, and breathing it isn't perfectly healthy. Solar Shower Advantages: Can get pretty darned clean. Disadvantages: You have to carry it, collect water, and even ...


8

Normal detergent should be able to break down the poisonous oils in question, it shouldn't require any specialist stuff to remove them. Just be sure of a few things: Wash infected clothes separate from "clean" (i.e. unaffected) ones to eliminate any possible risk of spreading Make especially sure you don't overload the machine - leave plenty of room so the ...


6

I trust Arc'teryx: http://www.arcteryx.com/product-care.aspx?EN There's a video to take you through the whole process. And you actually DO want to use the dryer because the heat reactivates the durable water repellant (DWR). DWR is the actual substance/layer that does the water repelling. You can also follow the instructions recommended on the actual ...


5

As long as you are washing with a front-loader, then putting in your water-proofs and washing on a low temperature with reproofer (instructions should be on the bottle) will get your get clean and waterproof. Top-loaders batter the hell out of your clothes, and can damage the waterproofing. Also - do not but them in a dryer... hang them out (you probably ...


4

Rinse your socks and undies out with water, rub them on rocks then re-rinse and wring dry. Put them on damp in the morning. I can't think of a lighter weight solution than that :) I've done plenty of trips with no extra pairs of anything. You certainly won't smell good at the end of 10 days, but I don't think your performance will be affected. Edit: ...


4

After a long day on the trail, I'll take my grooming bucket (reused plastic margarine or sherbet container with lid), and go down to the water hole. Collect some water and rinse out the bandana. Start at the head and work my way down/in. I'll pull off my shirt and then wash my torso. Pull off my socks and wash my legs. I then wash my groin area, and ...


3

From ventile.co.uk: Ventile can be either dry-cleaned as detailed below or hand washed using Grangers 30 Degree Cleaner Professional dry-cleaning in: perchloroethylene, hydrocarbons. Mild cleaning process with stringent limitation of added humidity and/or mechanical action and/or temperature. Commercial stain removers on a solvent base may ...


3

I don't have any good references for calorie expenditure, given that there are so many variables, so I will leave that to someone with a proper reference. In my personal experience in cold-weather, back country hiking and camping, the best time to wash is not at the end of a day's exertion when you are prone to getting chilled, but rather prior to starting ...


2

To wash any pack, you are pretty safe using a large commercial front-loading washer (found at many laundr-o-mats in the US) and regular detergent, then letting it drip-dry. Remove any removable buckles/straps first to prevent loss/damage (to both the pack and machine). For your white pack, a few thoughts: White outdoor gear is going to get dirty. Wear it ...


2

All Gore-Tex products come with care instruction, these should be followed, obviously. It's important to understand how these membranes work, I feel. Many Gore-tex and similar products consist of 3 layers, the first layer (inside the jacket) is designed to protect the Gore tex fabric. The second layer is the actual Gore tex itself The other layer ...



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