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22

In more temperate climates (forests, jungles, etc.) burying feces is preferred as it will be broken up by microbes in the soil while being somewhat protected from the environment. Plant growth in these areas is also rapid enough that cut roots are generally a non-issue. (I'm assuming you aren't hacking through larger roots.) In general the warmer the ...


15

The main reason it's buried is to keep it from washing into water supplies. The ground provides natural filtration, where surface waste is fully exposed to the elements and can flow along the surface until it reaches a stream or pond. Yes, digging holes might be bad for one plant, but it's a whole lot better than polluting a water supply that animals (or ...


9

There is really two different answers, one if you are dealing with glacial ice, and one for seasonal snow. For seasonal snow and for solids, your best bet is to bring biodegradable bags, pack your waste in as deep a hole as you can manage, and you should be fine. By deep, I mean a few feet at least, or better yet, a deep natural crevasse. For liquids, ...


9

If you were the only visitor to the area, the lowest impact would be to defecate on the surface and leave it. Few animals bury their waste, so natural disposal has evolved around dealing with surface waste. However, you aren't the only visitor. Burial slows decomposition and disrupts the soil, but it reduces the ability of microorganisms to reach water ...


7

I've carried them out, and I've burned them in the nightly fires we were having anyway. This was canoe-camping rather than hiking, so weight was less of an issue - but a weeklong trip accumulating diapers from two toddlers: smell was a problem. We used a dedicated bag for them, and kept it well away from everything else at campsites. Bags within bags within ...


7

In some heavily used areas, especially where there's little chance for natural decomposition to occur (such as at high altitudes where there is poor soil), you're required to pack out all human waste. For example, climbers on Mt. Rainier in Washington are required to carry specific bags to pack out their waste. This is not the most desirable configuration ...


6

My gut reaction is this - it's a can full of human waste, it's going to smell whatever you do with it. However, I wonder whether you might be going down the wrong kind of route with things such as bleach etc. - such chemicals may do more harm than good if they kill the micro-organisms that break down the waste. It may sound silly, I would try something like ...


6

If the depth of snow and/or the ground being frozen prevents you from burying solid waste below ground level by at least six inches, then, in the spirit of leave no trace, you should carry it out. Use a biodegradable (e.g. cornstarch-based) bag to pick it up and then pack it in a sealed plastic container. For obvious reasons the container should only be used ...


5

Goretex, generally consists of three chemicals. The outer The outer (wear resistant part) is simply nylon or polyester. This is typically non-hazardous and can be disposed as any other plastic (bearing in mind the long periods of time this is likely going to take to decompose) The inner This is the "Gore-tex layer". Goretex itself is simply a ...


5

Reliance makes Double Doodie Toilet Waste Bags with Bio-Gel. Each bag has an inner waste bag and also an outer sealable, leakproof bag. The Bio-Gel inside the bag reduces odors and solidifies the waste into a gel. Works well with most portable toilets.


4

It is not. The lowest-impact solution is to use a poo-pot. These are compulsory in alpine areas here in New Zealand. http://www.doc.govt.nz/documents/parks-and-recreation/places-to-visit/wellington/poo-pot-brochure-sm.pdf


4

I would dig a deep hole in the snow - and then cover it up again, because when the snow melts, the waste will decompose fairly quickly with warm temps and water, it'll break up and disperse. If it is practical, find some dead branches, leaves, or even rocks, and cover it up and then put snow back on top of it.


4

http://www.gore-tex.com.au/faq/w1/i1085252/ How should I dispose of a GORE-TEX® product in an environmentally safe way? Garments or footwear made from Gore laminates can be safely disposed of just like any other apparel product. Contrary to most other plastics, Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) – the raw material of our membrane - is not made or ...


3

I've got experience with this. The first trick is prevention: we would encourage our kid at any rest break to walk around bare-bottom and try to get them to go pee (there's tons of techniques, I'm a fan of making a hissing sound every time you go pee or take your kid to go pee, and having them regularly watch others go pee). We probably saved 1-2 diapers ...



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