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10

Yes. There's nothing wrong with melting snow and then purifying it with a standard water filter. Most of the water in mountain streams was snow at some point anyways. That being said, this is generally going to be a very inefficient way to make water, and if the temperature is below (or really anywhere near) freezing, you're going to be thirsty. I would ...


7

The terms to google on seem to be "turbidity," "total suspended solids," and "total dissolved solids." TSS refers to solids that can be eliminated by a filter, and TDS to solids that are in particles so small that they get through a filter. High TSS seems to be harmful to fish because it indirectly reduces the amount of oxygen: ...


6

It depends on the filter. Many filters use microtubules. If there is water in the filter and the snow freezes that water then you may crack the microtubules. You'll likely have no indication that you just broke your filter, potentially leading to the consumption of contaminated water.


5

Short answer, it depends. As with all fresh water sources the the important thing to notice is the context in which the water is in. I.e. where has the dirt come from? Where has the water come from? Couple of points that affect this: What is the dirt? Inert clay or run off from a sewer? What type of terrain are you in? Low agriculture, mountain terrain ...


5

Is this rust by chance? If so, let it dry and it'll be powdery at the bottom. Run your finger on the surface and some will come off on your finger. If it's rust, you may be able to get it clean with some steel wool. Just make sure to keep it dry after use from then on. SmemSeger could be correct and that it's mineral deposits. I usually find those to be ...


4

No you don't. We live in a small Swiss village of 380 inhabitants All the water we use comes from above the village as spring water This is piped to our house and to a village water trough (for animals and humans ) Tourists often ask to drink from our house because the idea of drinking from an outside water source is euuk (yes many are American) However ...


4

When you boil water, the minerals and anything else dissolved in the water will remain and can build up as deposits. This is true for filtered water as well, filters don't really soften your water, they only help remove any particulates and organisms that may be in it. I imagine the brown mineral layer you're getting in you pots is fine silt from your water ...


3

To add to Liam's answer, it depends what minerals/chemicals are in the water. Many of these are harmless (e.g. peat or clay), but other can be dangerous. In general, mineral contamination is not effected by boiling. Some chemical impurities can be removed by filtering, but most filters are primarily designed for removing microbes and will be of limited use ...


3

I used to do canoe trips on the English River, in western Ontario. One of the mills polluted the river with mercury, and it made the fish poisonous to eat in quantity. Throughout the lakes downstream there were signs giving the allowable eating -- on the order of one trout per week. We could drink the water. Local indians at the Grassy Narrows reserve ...


3

Polar pure, the most effective water treatment product availble, is now back in stock and availble for sale on amazon.com I would like to thank everybody for all there support, it was an unfortunately long process due to the "meth heads" that were using iodine, the same chemical used in polar pure, to make crystal meth. This caused the dea to create much ...


3

I have traveled the back country for 4-6 weeks a year for 30 years, mostly in the Canadian rockies and on the pre-cambrian shield. I've never used water purification, nor did we generally in our group. We've had some cases of the runs over the years, but the spread out nature made it unlikely it was a water source that did it. Far more likely bad hygiene ...


2

I'm going to assume that you are employing the SODIS method of water sterilization. To sum up the details of the process, this method is where you fill plastic pop bottles, (PET), up with rather clear water 3/4 full, shake them up, and let them sit in the bright sun for 5+ hours. The mechanism this works by is by utilizing the UV radiation in sunlight. ...


2

Be aware of the difference between removal of harmful pathogens and removal of chemical contamination. Harmful pathogens include amoeba, bacteria, viruses, and worms, and these are effectively destroyed by the following methods: boiling water for 90 seconds kills all the above iodine and chlorine kills bacteria, worms and amoeba but not viruses filters ...


1

Some methods for purifying water are: Iodine Bleach Boiling Filter Systems Each has pros and cons in terms of taste, purification, convenience, and costs.


1

At the very least, you'll want some type of plastic bottle. You can cut the end off of your plastic bottle and layer in ground ( smashed ) charcoal from your camp fire along with cotton, sand, grass, most anything you can get your hands on to filter out the different sized particles. Charcoal being the most likely to weed out micro organisms. ...



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