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29

Dehydration will very quickly reduce your ability to undertake the activities required to survive and so finding and conserving water should be a very high priority in any survival situation. Clearly there are potential dangers associated with drinking contaminated water but these need to be weighed against the dangers of dehydration. As with most survival ...


25

How much sea water can I safely drink? = None If you drink sea water, how much fresh water do you need to drink to off set the sea water you drank? = 2.8 units of distilled water per 1 unit of sea water (to neutralize without adding hydration) The "scientific" answer to this question involves a lot of complex math, human physiology and significant ...


24

Generally speaking, no. Arguably you should never go for out for any kind of extended exhausting activity without ensuring proper hydration, i.e. packing enough fluids at least for your immediate needs. The life straw will allow you to purify water sources you find up to a certain degree, but some concerns remain: You first need to actually find water ...


16

The question doesn't state what geographical area it's about, and it really isn't possible to give an answer that covers everything. In this answer, I'm only going to deal with pristine backcountry areas in North America, such as the Sierra. In order to interpret the scientific evidence properly, it's necessary to understand some scientific background about ...


8

I'm going to chime in on a more practical answer. The question is not "What is the scientific case for Giardia". The question is "Why are people so scared of it?" "Or why is everyone so scared of it now, when no one seemed to care before?" Or in other words, we're not talking about how dangerous Giardia is, but rather why people are worried; specifically ...


7

Why are People so Worried About Giardia? Because giardia is commonly found in backcountry water and it is known to make some people very sick. The EPA says [giardia] "Cysts have been found all months of the year in surface waters from the Arctic to the tropics in even the most pristine of surface waters." [a] Or why is everyone so scared of it now, ...


7

Dehydration will kill you before Giardia or cholera does. So, I'd first take a measure of where I am, do I absolutely need to drink the water is question, or is there any other better (safer, need not be testier) alternative to eat/drink. If I am in a desert-like situation, and I've found this water after a long long time, and I am sure its not potable, I'd ...


6

Lets say you planned well all your hikes and you know you will have constant availability of water all along the route then you could rely only on the Lifestraw. That said even for the best planned hike you can find that a seasonal source is not available in that particular moment or that some sources you counted on might have been contaminated by chemicals ...


5

I agree with fgysin's answer (no - water is very important - even with that equipment, you still need to find water, avoid chemical pollution, and access larger quantities of water for camp chores). I also want to add: Redundancy. "Two is one and one is none" sounds silly until something breaks or is lost, and then you realize where that phrase comes from. ...


4

Some excellent research-based answers here, so I'll focus on the practical implications. First, and most importantly: Most intestinal infections in the backcountry aren't caused by bad water - the main danger is poor personal hygiene in a setting where many allow standards to slip. So be scrupulous yourself, and be wary of sharing food that ...


4

How many percentage does the bacteria in the water die if it is boiled? 100%. More info here: How long does water need to be boiled for to kill all bacteria / viruses? How clean is it after boiling? Is it drinkable? It will still have any dirt, etc., but that isn't necessarily bad for you. Boiling will not get rid of chemical contaminants such as ...


4

In this post: How to clean cookware? which focuses more on equipment for cleaning (soap, sponge, sand, that sort of thing), one answer is directly related to this question (emphasis added): Regardless of your cleaning procedures, you definitely should use purified drinking-quality water for at least the final rinse of your dishes. I always play it safe ...


3

Is it safe to drink water from streams in Dartmoor using simple purification methods? Basically it depends on the water source. Follow some general rules and you should be fine though. boil for four minutes to kill off any nasties. bear in mind this won't remove all polutants, something like mercury will not be affected by boiling. A nano filter (...


3

There is a far higher risk of disease from poor hygiene by those in the outdoors than the consuming stream water, let alone using it for hand and dish washing. By not using stream water directly, you introduce a level of rationing of water. This rationing is likely to encourage poor hygiene habits, and increase the risk of disease. For washing hands, if ...


3

Your question is essentially Is stream water fit for cleaning hands, dishes, waste bins/buckets? and then it becomes really an issue of volume as you have a party of people who you need to cater for. The answer is it can be be, but likely not. People take different perspectives on the risk of contaminated water. Compared to others I have met who ...


3

I suppose you mean outside of village, so you are talking about streams and sources. In any alpine areas (France, Italy, Switzerland, Austria) I drink water unfiltered when I assume that there are no alps (place with cattle during summer) upstream, which worked for me. Of course you usually cannot be 100% sure about it, but almost so. If there is cattle ...


2

Water coming out of the pressure relief valve means that your filter is clogged, it say so in the instruction manual. Have you followed the "prepare filter surface" instructions? Did you remember to rinse the cartridge and pump out the loose carbon?


2

This Discovery News article says: A simple and inexpensive — but not necessarily the best tasting — method of purifying wild water is by dropping in a couple of purification tablets or drops. The most common chemical used is iodine, but chlorine or potassium permanganate are also effective. Let the chemicals treat the water for at least 20 minutes before ...


2

There are essentially three categories here: 1) water contaminates made safer by boiling. 2) water contaminates unchanged by boiling. 3) water contaminates made more dangerous by boiling. In case one, boiling works by killing biological organisms, rendering them unable to infect you. In case two, there are toxins that won't be affected by the ...


1

The answer is yes, potentially some contaminants could become more toxic compounds when subjected to heat. However the chances of you camping in such a location is rather remote, because places that get contaminated thusly are usually off limits.


1

I'm Swiss and I've been drinking water from mountain streams all my life, without any altitude restriction, while observing three basic rules. You can drink the water if: the river is small enough to jump across it there is no cattle (alpage) above, where cows, goats and sheep may poo into the water there is no human settlement above Drinking this water ...



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