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10

Yes. There's nothing wrong with melting snow and then purifying it with a standard water filter. Most of the water in mountain streams was snow at some point anyways. That being said, this is generally going to be a very inefficient way to make water, and if the temperature is below (or really anywhere near) freezing, you're going to be thirsty. I would ...


7

How much sea water can I safely drink? = None If you drink sea water, how much fresh water do you need to drink to off set the sea water you drank? = 2.8 units of distilled water per 1 unit of sea water (to neutralize without adding hydration) The "scientific" answer to this question involves a lot of complex math, human physiology and significant ...


7

The terms to google on seem to be "turbidity," "total suspended solids," and "total dissolved solids." TSS refers to solids that can be eliminated by a filter, and TDS to solids that are in particles so small that they get through a filter. High TSS seems to be harmful to fish because it indirectly reduces the amount of oxygen: ...


6

It depends on the filter. Many filters use microtubules. If there is water in the filter and the snow freezes that water then you may crack the microtubules. You'll likely have no indication that you just broke your filter, potentially leading to the consumption of contaminated water.


5

Short answer, it depends. As with all fresh water sources the the important thing to notice is the context in which the water is in. I.e. where has the dirt come from? Where has the water come from? Couple of points that affect this: What is the dirt? Inert clay or run off from a sewer? What type of terrain are you in? Low agriculture, mountain terrain ...


5

Is this rust by chance? If so, let it dry and it'll be powdery at the bottom. Run your finger on the surface and some will come off on your finger. If it's rust, you may be able to get it clean with some steel wool. Just make sure to keep it dry after use from then on. SmemSeger could be correct and that it's mineral deposits. I usually find those to be ...


4

When you boil water, the minerals and anything else dissolved in the water will remain and can build up as deposits. This is true for filtered water as well, filters don't really soften your water, they only help remove any particulates and organisms that may be in it. I imagine the brown mineral layer you're getting in you pots is fine silt from your water ...


4

How many percentage does the bacteria in the water die if it is boiled? 100%. More info here: How long does water need to be boiled for to kill all bacteria / viruses? How clean is it after boiling? Is it drinkable? It will still have any dirt, etc., but that isn't necessarily bad for you. Boiling will not get rid of chemical contaminants such as ...


3

To add to Liam's answer, it depends what minerals/chemicals are in the water. Many of these are harmless (e.g. peat or clay), but other can be dangerous. In general, mineral contamination is not effected by boiling. Some chemical impurities can be removed by filtering, but most filters are primarily designed for removing microbes and will be of limited use ...


3

I suppose you mean outside of village, so you are talking about streams and sources. In any alpine areas (France, Italy, Switzerland, Austria) I drink water unfiltered when I assume that there are no alps (place with cattle during summer) upstream, which worked for me. Of course you usually cannot be 100% sure about it, but almost so. If there is cattle ...


2

Rectal infusion I have read of a case where people survived in a life raft not by drinking their own urine, but by rectally infusing urine through a tube. This is apparently quite a safe way to get your body to extracting the water in a fluid without absorbing all/too many of the potentially dangerous waste products. Turns out one of the survivors was a ...


2

A simple and inexpensive — but not necessarily the best tasting — method of purifying wild water is by dropping in a couple of purification tablets or drops. The most common chemical used is iodine, but chlorine or potassium permanganate are also effective. Let the chemicals treat the water for at least 20 minutes before consuming, and mix it with powdered ...


2

Water coming out of the pressure relief valve means that your filter is clogged, it say so in the instruction manual. Have you followed the "prepare filter surface" instructions? Did you remember to rinse the cartridge and pump out the loose carbon?


1

There are essentially three categories here: 1) water contaminates made safer by boiling. 2) water contaminates unchanged by boiling. 3) water contaminates made more dangerous by boiling. In case one, boiling works by killing biological organisms, rendering them unable to infect you. In case two, there are toxins that won't be affected by the ...


1

The answer is yes, potentially some contaminants could become more toxic compounds when subjected to heat. However the chances of you camping in such a location is rather remote, because places that get contaminated thusly are usually off limits.


1

I'm Swiss and I've been drinking water from mountain streams all my life, without any altitude restriction, while observing three basic rules. You can drink the water if: the river is small enough to jump across it there is no cattle (alpage) above, where cows, goats and sheep may poo into the water there is no human settlement above Drinking this water ...



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