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To add to Liam's answer, it depends what minerals/chemicals are in the water. Many of these are harmless (e.g. peat or clay), but other can be dangerous. In general, mineral contamination is not effected by boiling. Some chemical impurities can be removed by filtering, but most filters are primarily designed for removing microbes and will be of limited use ...


0

Wikipedia has some interesting points on this: The elimination of micro-organisms by boiling follows first-order kinetics—at high temperatures it is achieved in less time and at lower temperatures, in more time. The heat sensitivity of micro-organisms varies, at 70 °C (158 °F), Giardia species (causes Giardiasis) can take ten minutes for complete ...


5

Short answer, it depends. As with all fresh water sources the the important thing to notice is the context in which the water is in. I.e. where has the dirt come from? Where has the water come from? Couple of points that affect this: What is the dirt? Inert clay or run off from a sewer? What type of terrain are you in? Low agriculture, mountain terrain ...


7

The terms to google on seem to be "turbidity," "total suspended solids," and "total dissolved solids." TSS refers to solids that can be eliminated by a filter, and TDS to solids that are in particles so small that they get through a filter. High TSS seems to be harmful to fish because it indirectly reduces the amount of oxygen: ...



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