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38

To answer my own question. I checked it with different dealers and experts, and all of them told that if I want to use it on regular basis, I should consider inflatables as toys. Also here in Switzerland it counts as flotation device and is not allowed more than 150 meters offshore. I bought myself a hardshell kayak for about 300$ more and next Monday I ...


21

In Canada, at least, we do distinguish between kayaks and canoes, and those are the words I'll use for the contrast here. To first make sure there's no confusion, have a look at the articles in wikipedia: "A kayak is a small, relatively narrow, human-powered boat primarily designed to be manually propelled by means of a double bladed paddle. The ...


9

Care for your neoprene water shoes as you would for any neoprene wetsuit. http://scubadiverlife.com/2011/03/15/scuba-wetsuit-care-101-removing-odors-extending-suit-life/ You can use any search engine and search for 'wetsuit soap' or 'wetsuit wash' and will find suitable products. Stop by any dive shop where you are travelling and they will likely have ...


8

Let's start with the easy one first: No fins - this really only works with a long board, as the board's length gives it the stability a fin would normally give you. You aren't going to be able to tackle short, steep waves like this. 1 fin - gives lift when surfing, as the water in the face of the wave is rising. Otherwise you slip down the face of the ...


8

Here are some things I've noticed in my relatively limited snorkeling experience: Fins with straps are quite annoying. The strap never really holds well, and you already have enough problems being awkward with fins on that you want them to at least be secure. An open toe will allow them to drain when you get out and the vent makes them easier to get on ...


7

Paddles board sizing are relative to what you wish to do with said board. Short boards 8' or under are generally used for children. Medium boards 9' to probably around 12' are good for calm lakes / rivers and for some fun in the surf. Long boards, 12' or more are for the more serious journeys, touring or racing. They are faster and track straighter. ...


7

The first thing to understand is that fins are not strictly necessary snorkeling gear; I've often snorkeled without them. Fins compensate for not using hands while swimming. If you have an underwater camera and/or anticipate strong currents, you'll want to use fins in order to help you propel yourself along under water. Even if these don't apply, having fins ...


6

1.) I would be hesitant to advise you to put them in the dryer. I've never tried or experienced it myself, and my evidence is completely anecdotal, but I've heard that the neoprene has the potential to turn brittle if exposed to forced heating. 2.) The two main things to consider when drying out gloves like this (as well as other things like boots, socks, ...


6

I don't have specific numbers on strength and duarability, but I have had both and repaired both rather often. I work with a scout troop that has currently 22 floating canoes. The protector we put on both is the same, the hole repair method is the same the only real difference is when you dent or completely wrap the Royalite canoe around a rock. With the ...


6

For the US, an excellent starting point would be the Coast Guard's Aids to Navigation brochure; it explains all of the markers you are likely to encounter and provides a brief overview of the "rules of the road". The Coast Guard's Navigation Rules Online is an unofficial merger of the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (COLREGS) and ...


5

Sounds like what you're looking for is either an undersuit, or simply some swimming pants/tights. Wetsuit undersuits are worn under diving wetsuits to add insulation and comfort to the suit, and they help slide the suit on and off a bit easier, some are essentially built like a body-rashguard. Swim tights are exactly what they sound like, tight pants that ...


4

The big difference between canoeing and kayaking is the cargo capacity. Kayaks might have small portholes to store gear in, otherwise you're stuck with what you can lash onto the top of the kayak. Whereas canoes are the pick-up truck of the backwoods and you can have a level of exhorbient luxery rivalling car-camping. Want a proper chair to sit in at camp? ...


3

Rinsing them in clean water when you are finished using them will definitely help stop them smelling. To deal with the current smell I would just leave them in a sink/bucket of clean water for a couple of hours/overnight. I wouldn't worry too much about drying them as long as they are cleaned. As you said using soap is not a a good idea unless you get ...


3

In general most buoys and navigational marks are informational. (There are some that could mark prohibited or restricted areas, but those are rare) Mostly they are of the “you are here” or “shallow water past this point” variety. The “you are here” type can be helpful if fog, rain etc. reduce visibility before you get back to shore. The “shallow water past ...


3

I'm sure there is lots of useful info out there but I recently watched this short film on Korduroy tv on fin design that I found very informative. The film discusses the notion that changing your fin setup can significantly change the way your board performs e.g. a fin that is more vertical with more surface area than one that is swept-back will pivot more ...


2

Every boat is different, and every crew is different. There is no set standard. Some people go single-handed on a ketch, some have fairly large crew. Bernard Moitessier used to sail a 39-foot ketch single-handed and with his wife.


2

Powered boats are typically expected to yield to non-powered boats such as your kayak, but that's not to say you shouldn't be aware of your surroundings, if not for your own safety then at least to be courteous. When I'm in a Kayak I tend to stay near the shore unless it's early morning or late evening when few other people are around, it's just easier for ...


1

Apart from what all options suggested by other users here, If you are up for investing a bit, You might want to look out for Neoprene shampoos that are used by Scuba Divers to clean their Scuba suits. The Bacteria and the stinking has a close relation. The other way to go is Vinegar with water. A bucket of water with 2-3 tablespoons of vinegar should do. ...


1

Since most high-tech fins are made for scuba diving, you may want to consider wearing small 1.5mm neoprene dive booties with dive fins. This eliminates several issues with: fin straps falling off your heels chafing / blistering around your fins where they rub the skin toes getting compressed in your fin in order to get a snug fit. low selection ...


1

My surfing/windsurfing knowledge is limited. But yes they can be dangerous and yes you should seek knowledge on currents before surfing anywhere. There are currents that can force you against rocks, or into sea caves or under water of the dreaded rip tides. Rip tides are nasty and can suck you out to sea. My mate was caught in one of these once and in a ...



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