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19

In Canada, at least, we do distinguish between kayaks and canoes, and those are the words I'll use for the contrast here. To first make sure there's no confusion, have a look at the articles in wikipedia: "A kayak is a small, relatively narrow, human-powered boat primarily designed to be manually propelled by means of a double bladed paddle. The ...


7

Here are some things I've noticed in my relatively limited snorkeling experience: Fins with straps are quite annoying. The strap never really holds well, and you already have enough problems being awkward with fins on that you want them to at least be secure. An open toe will allow them to drain when you get out and the vent makes them easier to get on ...


6

The first thing to understand is that fins are not strictly necessary snorkeling gear; I've often snorkeled without them. Fins compensate for not using hands while swimming. If you have an underwater camera and/or anticipate strong currents, you'll want to use fins in order to help you propel yourself along under water. Even if these don't apply, having fins ...


5

1.) I would be hesitant to advise you to put them in the dryer. I've never tried or experienced it myself, and my evidence is completely anecdotal, but I've heard that the neoprene has the potential to turn brittle if exposed to forced heating. 2.) The two main things to consider when drying out gloves like this (as well as other things like boots, socks, ...


5

For the US, an excellent starting point would be the Coast Guard's Aids to Navigation brochure; it explains all of the markers you are likely to encounter and provides a brief overview of the "rules of the road". The Coast Guard's Navigation Rules Online is an unofficial merger of the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (COLREGS) and ...


3

The big difference between canoeing and kayaking is the cargo capacity. Kayaks might have small portholes to store gear in, otherwise you're stuck with what you can lash onto the top of the kayak. Whereas canoes are the pick-up truck of the backwoods and you can have a level of exhorbient luxery rivalling car-camping. Want a proper chair to sit in at camp? ...


3

In general most buoys and navigational marks are informational. (There are some that could mark prohibited or restricted areas, but those are rare) Mostly they are of the “you are here” or “shallow water past this point” variety. The “you are here” type can be helpful if fog, rain etc. reduce visibility before you get back to shore. The “shallow water past ...


2

Powered boats are typically expected to yield to non-powered boats such as your kayak, but that's not to say you shouldn't be aware of your surroundings, if not for your own safety then at least to be courteous. When I'm in a Kayak I tend to stay near the shore unless it's early morning or late evening when few other people are around, it's just easier for ...


1

My surfing/windsurfing knowledge is limited. But yes they can be dangerous and yes you should seek knowledge on currents before surfing anywhere. There are currents that can force you against rocks, or into sea caves or under water of the dreaded rip tides. Rip tides are nasty and can suck you out to sea. My mate was caught in one of these once and in a ...



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