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28

Assuming you don't have a genitourinary tract infection, fresh urine should be sterile, the problem is that it is a waste product which, apart from making it not taste very nice, means that consuming it will increase the concentration of waste in your body which will require an increased volume of water to absorb and subsequently excrete, resulting in you ...


24

Another option is to keep your water bottle inside your jacket and use your body heat to prevent the water from freezing. Many mountaineering jackets have internal elasticated mesh pockets for this purpose. Alternatively, I find I can just put the water bottle inside my jacket and use the waist belt of my rucksack to prevent the bottle from falling down ...


23

First, you won't need to make this observation if you routinely drink when you stop to rest, and if you eat something at least slightly salty whenever you snack (if your snacks include jerky or salted nuts you're more than covered.) Second, pay attention to your thirst. Many of us ignore our bodies for hours at a time - postponing bodily functions during a ...


22

Copy and paste from the answer here: http://skeptics.stackexchange.com/questions/1540/is-it-a-good-idea-to-drink-your-own-urine-in-a-survival-situation Summary: You can do it, as a last resort, but it's dicey. The US Army doesn't think it's a good idea and lists it on its "Do NOT drink" list, stating in its Field Manual that it "contains harmful body ...


22

As a former soldier (and Medic), I personally don't flavour my water during the outdoors. The contents of the canteen/flask might be required for a non-drinking purpose such as: Eyewash Rinsing Medical Cleaning etc However, I do flavour my water on a day-to-day basis for the gym etc using super-concentrate micro capsules such as Squash'd If you have ...


21

First things first. You do not need to purify all water sources. Just because it is not out of a tap does not make it immediately dirty. Most fresh wilderness water (providing it isn't stagnant, etc.) is fine for drinking. You should be familiar with the source of the water. Just because the river looks clean doesn't mean that an industrial unit isn't ...


19

Via WebMD Large amounts or long-term use of iodine are possibly unsafe. Adults should avoid prolonged use of doses higher than 1100 mcg per day (the upper tolerable limit, UL) without proper medical supervision. However I seriously question that 1100 mcg number because people in Northern Japan have been found to consume over 80,000 mcg per day due to a ...


19

Dehydration occurs when there is more water going out or being used than is going in. Additionally, if you're drinking too fast (more than a litre an hour for an average adult male), you're not absorbing the water and so it doesn't count as going in. Confusingly, dehydration can also be classified loss of water, loss of electrolytes or loss of both. To add ...


18

Urine is normally sterile (barring urinary tract infections) - so, from bacteriological stance, fresh urine isn't going to hurt. The problem is - urine is a waste product, and so is full of stuff that your body wants to be rid of. Worse, as you get more dehydrated, your body produces more concentrated urine. That said - as a short term measure to keep ...


17

I led extended backpacking trips in Grand Canyon country for several years, and we required everyone carry at MINIMUM a gallon (almost 4 litre) per person per day -- which adds up. (Though rarely did we plan trips that did not have dependable water sources within a day's walk, meaning we would start and end the day with bellies full of water.) Different ...


17

Should I understand a water source to mean a spring/well, or any place where hikers may collect water (streams, lakes, etc.)? Yes. Any source of water - no matter how large or small - should be avoided when choosing a camp site. 100 meters is just a guideline, 200 meters is better. 200 meters and out of sight is great. The reasons are several-fold: ...


16

It is likely caused by iron in the pump or pipes. According to the Illinois Department of Public Health: Iron is mainly present in water in two forms: either the soluble ferrous iron or the insoluble ferric iron. Water containing ferrous iron is clear and colorless because the iron is completely dissolved. When exposed to air in the pressure tank or ...


14

Freeze the bottles, then keep them together if possible. Any insulation around them will help.


14

The symptoms of dehydration and over-hydration are similar, and this can lead to occasional mistreatment. Symptoms common to both include headaches, confusion, loss of appetite, irritability, nausea and vomiting, muscle weakness, muscle cramps, and seizures. With the popularity of sports drinks and staying hydrated, exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) ...


13

In dry climates you can take advantage of evaporative cooling - especially on a bike. In hot and humid places you are stuck with insulation and pre-cooled water and/or ice. Have you experimented to see if a cloth wrapper around your bottles is enough to cool things when damp? Of course, you're not going to get highly chilled water, but it can be ...


12

Hiking in the desert? As much as you can carry! I tend to prefer packing more water than less, and especially in a desert area where if something goes wrong, your access to resupply is very limited. You can lose up to two quarts (almost 2 litre) of water per hour hiking in the desert in middle of the day, but you can only absorb around one quart (almost one ...


12

You need to distill it - I'm assuming that freezing is not an option (unless you're camping in the extreme latitudes). This is easiest, as the ice on top is almost pure water. Where you don't have a freezer available - boiling the water, capturing the steam and condensing it back to water will provide pure water.


12

The rule is 3 liters per person per day. You may get away with 2 liters if it's not too hot and you stay moderate. Keep into account that your "normal day" intake is skewed by the contribute brought from food. If you eat food with less water in it, which is likely during a hike, your need for actual water is higher than the one you experience in your daily ...


12

If you run out half-way, perhaps you should bring twice as much? That being said... One option for day hikes is to hydrate well before hitting the trail. Also, have readily available water for your return. e.g. leave a water bottle in your car. An other option is refilling from natural water sources during the trip would allow you to consume an adequate ...


11

500 ml and 20 oz water bottles from a convenience store will freeze without breaking. You can carry them inside your clothes, in your pack next to your body, and keep them inside your sleeping bag to help keep them from freezing.


11

You always look at places where water could accumulate (here are some not so obvious choices): Extra green vegetation like sycamore tree is good indicator of water source. You can utilize the plants transpiration via plastic bag or bottle. And just leave it out in the sun. With big enough plastic bag over bush you can collect quite a bit of water. Bellow ...


11

The effects of drinking distilled, deminieralized, deionized, and many other forms of water purification have been thoroughly studied and despite the research, the jury is still out on the subject, with regards to temporary usage. As far as adventuring goes, it appears it does not matter, as long as the water you are drinking is microbiologically and ...


10

CamelBak have a great Care & Tips section on their website. Summarising their recommendations: Keep it clean and dry when not in use. If mould develops: Use hot water and two tablespoons of baking soda or bleach Leave for about 30 minutes Wash with hot water and mild soap Air dry


10

As Cryptosporidium is passed in the faeces of animals, the more heavily the land is used by animals, the greater the risk of Cryptosporidium contamination in water sourced from that land. This article suggests some ways (quoted below) to avoid Giardia (which has a similar lifecycle to Cryptosporidium), conversely, if you are unable to source water following ...


10

The key is to always have a trash bag. Your most reliable backwoods method for clean water is condensation, either through natural action, or via a still of some kind. The primary component of this is having large enough suitable material to make said still. If you are depending on natural action, then surface area is still key. Assuming you left your ...


10

Filter the water right away, when filling the bottle. This way I'm sure the water inside the bottle is safe for drinking. This. Why? The main point for me is accessibility of that water. If you come to a situation where you need fresh water, then it may not just be because you've set up camp, you've got a while to spare and you feel like a drink. It ...


10

Colour if urine is a good indicator. The lighter the colour, the better your hydration is. Once you start to feel thirsty, you are already dehydrated.


9

If you're hiking in dry, hot weather places, and you have a whole backpacking setup your best bet is to store your water deep in your pack. The sun is your only real enemy here. In the desert, I've had success with packing my bag so that my water is "wrapped" in my insulated gear - jacket and sleeping bag. Since I don't actually want to expose my sleeping ...


9

Do a google search for urine colour (or color) chart and you will find many charts showing examples of what your urine should look like when you are hydrated. or not. Here is a slightly more humourous version but shows the principle:


9

Tree's generate water as part of the respiration process (not to be confused with photosynthesis which is different). This happens at night and day. This is relatively static day or night. Photosynthesis alters dependant on sunlight, respiration (being the process of producing energy) does not. Respiration will alter dependant on the time of year, i.e. ...



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