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8

The usual advice to someone in an emergency situation in the wilderness is to stay put, so that it's easier for rescuers to find you. In this situation, performance isn't an issue. There is a folk belief that "thirst is too late," and that people are commonly dehydrated without knowing it. If you believed that, then you might drink some of your water even ...


7

You've already mentioned the cons. The advantage of a hydration pack that doesn't require sucking on the tube becomes apparent after slogging up a long, hard hill. Your diaphragm is already exhausted and putting all its energy into pumping your lungs. Putting in the extra effort to create the vacuum necessary to suck water out of a straw suddenly becomes ...


7

I have a very simple reasoning about it. It's only based on personal experience, so don't regard it as absolute truth. Your body needs a certain amount of water to be comfortable, say, N. Comfort here includes urination (removal of poisons from body) and sweating (removal of heat). If you drink N or more, the body will function well. If you drink less than ...


7

Given that your water is clean I don't think cleaning the bottle is a major concern. Personally I would rinse a water bottle out with tap water before filling (or maybe once a day if using it lots) and only bother with soap if visibly dirty. Therefore I would say your suggestion is more than necessary but not excessive. For reference I fill my water bottle ...


5

The literature is mostly pro-drinking and anti-rationing. Hopefully these sources will provide some details for you. The U.S. Army survival manual does not recommend that you drink water only when thirsty, as this leads to under hydrating. Instead, water should be drunk at regular intervals. Even in cold weather: Don't take chances with hydration. Do ...


4

As long as the water you are filling it with is clean, it won't be the problem. What may cause an issue is your mouth. Human mouths are not especially clean, and while microorganisms are kept at bay in the mouth, they can start to multiply rapidly in water. I always recommend washing bottles once a day. As a simple, convenient and quick hygiene step it ...


3

If your water source is clean and assuming you are a relatively clean person in a fairly clean environment (not working in sanitation), You can probably get away with never cleaning it and not get sick. Tap water usually has some chlorine in it to keep basic bacteria and virus levels low. So refilling it with this water will keep the general levels low ...


2

Cleaning once a week may be slightly more than enough, but it is reasonable. Depending on your environment, there may be factors that cause the bottle to smell bad. Something I have learned from biking is to store the empty bottle in the freezer at night, or when not in use. Freezing kills a lot of things and prevents growth of mold/mildew. It has the ...


2

More important than the cleaning is, in my opinion the choice of the bootle. I switched to a bottle explicitly designed for a use like yours, in my case a Nalgene drinking bottle. My reasons for doing so: Health concerns: While I think there are regulations about what materials are allowed in drinking bottles, they have shown to be insufficient in many ...


1

When I took a wildlands firefighting course in Arizona, the instructor said that if you find yourself lost in the desert, you should not ration your water. People have died of thirst with water in their canteens.



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