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6

This seems a bit low to me, but there are lots of other factors to consider. The main ones are temperature and exertion/walking speed. Different people also definitely need different amounts of water. One of my friends was nicknamed desert-man as he drank approximately 4x as much as everyone else. If you are in the UK or a similarly cool climate, then 100ml ...


5

How much water you need depends on how big you are, how fit you are, where you are and what you're doing. For example, on Mount Everest, the average person needs to drink 4-5L of water each day just so that their body can function properly. You lose water through your breath, perspiration, urine and bowel movements. If you're a big guy that's out of shape, ...


3

People do not realize that their public water are delivered by iron pipes buried 20 to 80 years ago. I was an engineering student and if you cut those pipes you will see rust around the pipes. So people do not realized that they are drinking water through rusted interior of water pipes. No one has died from it.


3

No, 100 ml per hour is way too little in many circumstances. That would mean only 1 l over a 10 hour hike. Anyone that's been on a 10 hour hike, even not in particularly hot or dry weather, can tell you that's not nearly enough. For hiking in hot desert conditions, 1 l per hour (10 times your suggestion) is more like it. I have done significant hiking in ...


2

I found this interesting article on the topic of cold weather and hydration. http://www.unh.edu/news/news_releases/2005/january/sk_050128cold.html In cold weather you lose significant moisture just by breathing the dry air. Even in 100% humidity ( very rare in winter) the cold air can suck moisture from your lungs since it warms up in the lungs and can ...


1

For certain contaminants such as Giardia, it doesn't matter whether the water is running fast or slow. You will get infected regardless. So this idea about "fast water" is a myth that is not correct. If you are drinking close to the source of streams and there is not any mining activity or industrial pollution nearby, then OF COURSE you are drinking clean ...



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