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23

First, you won't need to make this observation if you routinely drink when you stop to rest, and if you eat something at least slightly salty whenever you snack (if your snacks include jerky or salted nuts you're more than covered.) Second, pay attention to your thirst. Many of us ignore our bodies for hours at a time - postponing bodily functions during a ...


21

As a former soldier (and Medic), I personally don't flavour my water during the outdoors. The contents of the canteen/flask might be required for a non-drinking purpose such as: Eyewash Rinsing Medical Cleaning etc However, I do flavour my water on a day-to-day basis for the gym etc using super-concentrate micro capsules such as Squash'd If you have ...


19

Dehydration occurs when there is more water going out or being used than is going in. Additionally, if you're drinking too fast (more than a litre an hour for an average adult male), you're not absorbing the water and so it doesn't count as going in. Confusingly, dehydration can also be classified loss of water, loss of electrolytes or loss of both. To add ...


15

It is likely caused by iron in the pump or pipes. According to the Illinois Department of Public Health: Iron is mainly present in water in two forms: either the soluble ferrous iron or the insoluble ferric iron. Water containing ferrous iron is clear and colorless because the iron is completely dissolved. When exposed to air in the pressure tank or ...


14

The symptoms of dehydration and over-hydration are similar, and this can lead to occasional mistreatment. Symptoms common to both include headaches, confusion, loss of appetite, irritability, nausea and vomiting, muscle weakness, muscle cramps, and seizures. With the popularity of sports drinks and staying hydrated, exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) ...


11

The effects of drinking distilled, deminieralized, deionized, and many other forms of water purification have been thoroughly studied and despite the research, the jury is still out on the subject, with regards to temporary usage. As far as adventuring goes, it appears it does not matter, as long as the water you are drinking is microbiologically and ...


10

Filter the water right away, when filling the bottle. This way I'm sure the water inside the bottle is safe for drinking. This. Why? The main point for me is accessibility of that water. If you come to a situation where you need fresh water, then it may not just be because you've set up camp, you've got a while to spare and you feel like a drink. It ...


10

Colour if urine is a good indicator. The lighter the colour, the better your hydration is. Once you start to feel thirsty, you are already dehydrated.


9

Do a google search for urine colour (or color) chart and you will find many charts showing examples of what your urine should look like when you are hydrated. or not. Here is a slightly more humourous version but shows the principle:


9

Tree's generate water as part of the respiration process (not to be confused with photosynthesis which is different). This happens at night and day. This is relatively static day or night. Photosynthesis alters dependant on sunlight, respiration (being the process of producing energy) does not. Respiration will alter dependant on the time of year, i.e. ...


8

Single use water bottles are nice, like Steed mentioned. I use those a lot. The downside is that most filters don't readily attach to those bottles, which means I often wish I had a third hand when pumping water. Whenever I have space in my pack, I like to use a hydration bladder. You don't have to take your pack off to drink or ask someone else to hand you ...


7

Distilled / deionized (as for lab purposes) water tastes stale. So do reverse-osmosis drinking water, and cooked water: this is attributed mainly to the lack of CO2 / HCO3⁻ compared to fresh ground / tap drinking water. Yes, you can encounter distilled water in outdoor situations. In winter it lies around on the ground as white powder... Lots of people ...


7

This depends greatly on where you will be going and therefore how available water is. Dehydration is a serious issue, so if in doubt bring a little extra. For example, if you're going to be hiking in the Arizona desert in summer, figure you're not going to find any water and you have to bring all that you plan to use. Yes, that could be a lot and it will ...


7

You really don't need equipment as such. There are quite a few symptoms that you can observe, may be at a gradual rising rate. Symptoms are observed with as the degree of Dehydration gets worst. Normal: (I'll say recoverable without having to stop the venture then and there itself. One can continue only if he/she can start hydrating himself/herself ...


6

It's also a good idea when camping in freezing weather to pour some water into your cooking pot before going to sleep so that if it freezes overnight it will freeze in the pot rather than the container. It's a lot easier then to melt the ice in the pot rather than the container when you wake up in the morning and want the water for breakfast or a hot drink!


6

Cause of coloring: As you specifically referred to Groundwater, I believe it is most likely due to the Manganese and Iron contents in the water. Iron and manganese are common metallic elements found in the earth's crust. Water percolating through soil and rock can dissolve minerals containing iron and manganese and hold them in solution. Occasionally, ...


6

The bottom line is there is always SOME risk. Whether to take that risk or not is your choice. Fast running + isolated + high elevation = prettttty low risk. With that said the biggest concern is, unless you are drinking right from the source, you have no idea what has happened upstream from you. There could be a dead animal snagged in the stream, animal ...


6

In my experience, it can be hard to tell the two apart, plus there is also ketosis to worry about. If you are exercising vigorously (cycling, running, vigorous climbing, etc.) for several hours and not eating much, you can consume all of the readily-available glucose in the body and begin burning protein instead. A waste product of burning protein in this ...


6

I asked my fitness instructor this question a few years ago. She had several things to say. Electrolyte replacement is for when you have been in a high cardio, sweating mode continually for an hour or more. Endurance runners and cyclists, yes. Gym bunnies, trampers, walkers, no. Very few things on the market are actually true electrolyte replacement. ...


6

There are a lot of myths about water and dehydration: http://www.lightandmatter.com/article/hiking_water.html . One of these is the belief that people are in danger of being dehydrated without knowing it. Dehydration is a serious medical condition that sets in long after thirst, and thirst is a powerful sensation that commands your attention. When people say ...


6

That is a very tricky question... Pure water is the best for everything. There are lots of things you can use to add some taste and make it easy to drink but there are some considerations about that as well. For sure those electrolytes are the best options but they are not cheap. In a camping trip, where exercise is not the focus, all those already said, ...


5

I think your assumptions are correct. To my knowledge in a mountain environment you are quite safe as long as you follow some simple rules, which you mostly already named: The water was not standing, i.e. it comes from a stream that is rather fast and the stream is big enough that it is not just a connection of puddles or ponds where the water rinses ...


5

Few things I do: bring tea. bring water flavoring packets, like Crystal Light or Propel. bring coffee or instant coffee. know your surrounding vegetation and make tea out of different plants, leaves, and/or roots. Emphasis on knowing your surrounding vegetation; make sure you know which plants (or parts of plants) are suitable for consumption.


5

I preferably avoid artificial materials, so I would use lemon, orange or grapefruit juice, just a bit for the taste, not really making lemonade (although it might irritate your stomach after several days of drinking it). Crushed herb leaves can also give a new taste to the already "boring" water - for this purpose I would use mint, wild thyme, basil or ...


4

You can't tell by looking, and it's an issue that occurs naturally, not just because of industrial contamination. Even if you're hiking in a pristine environment like a national park, where this kind of man-made contamination isn't likely to be a concern, there can still be contamination from naturally occurring substances like arsenic. Natural blue-green ...


4

Muscle cramps, especially in the leg, are a symptom of low electrolyte (salt) levels (though there are other possible causes). Note that they are not a symptom of dehydration, though the two often happen in conjunction due to sweating.


3

General rule is to be flexible. Small plastic bottle gives you absolutely no flexibility. Big plastic bottle gives you more flexibility. You can fill it fully or only to the half, or one third. Two plastic bottles give you even more flexibility. You can take 0,5l water, you can take 1, 2 or 3 liters - depending how much you will need. 0,5 liter water ...


3

In my experience, it generally works fine if I simply use cheap, lightweight water bottles (e.g., a 2-liter soda bottle), and put them inside my pack while I'm hiking. The surrounding material in the pack insulates the bottle from the cold air, and my body heats up the pack, so the water doesn't freeze. If the weather is very cold, I can use extra care in ...


3

I recently hiked in the desert in April and drank 8 oz per half hour, which was a pint an hour. That was not enough. I felt like a dried out sponge for a couple days after, and this was only a six hour day hike. I will plan a quart an hour in the future if at all possible, so that means a gallon for every four hours out.


3

According to wildwoodsurvival, the sand helps remove suspended particles. Charcoal helps to remove chemical impurities. The charcoal plays the role of active carbon. The water filtration process use multiple materials, from coarse to fine, to prevent clogging. As a last stage, the charcoal can also help remove some bacterias. Note that the author of the ...



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