Hot answers tagged

19

If it is clean, fresh snow, it is safe to drink. This is basically drinking rain water. It hasn't had time to pick up pollutants when it is newly fallen. I live in New England, and kids do this all the time. You get taught early to only do this with white snow. Make sure that the snow is actually clean: the longer it sits, and the more urbanized an area is, ...


17

It depends very much on the specific geography. But the idea of "whirlpools" that suck down people or entire ships, never to be seen again (which I suspect is what fascinates you) is largely a myth. The dangers aren't any different (and typically much smaller) than those posed by whitewater rapids in rivers. Specific dangers are: Being knocked against ...


12

Pee on it. To keep the water drinkable, you'd want to have the liquids separated but still have good thermal transfer between them. A well equipped traveller will pick his/her thermos bottle and a condom, pee in the condom (ladies would probably do it the other way around), tie the condom and put in the bottle, fill the rest with snow, cap, wait and drink. ...


12

The best way to melt snow is to put it in a bottle inside your jacket under your mid layers while you're on the move and let your body heat melt it. Do not place it against the skin, leave a layer or two between you and the bottle. It's advisable to always leave your bottle in your jacket in subzero temperatures where it can freeze if left in your bag. ...


11

From a water purity point of view the same rules apply for drinking water. What is important though is the temperature. If you drink large amounts of snow at a low temperature (i.e. you don't heat it adequately and just drink it as it melts in your hand) then you may need to be careful. Basically if the temperature is low enough and you're ingesting large ...


8

You'd be better of strength training your muscles to carry the extra weight of the water you need to carry. How much water an individual needs to stay hydrated is not a standard measure. Different individuals need more or less water to keep their bodies properly hydrated. I don't think it's necessarily wise to try and train your body to do with less of ...


8

It is normal to a certain degree that wet leather, after drying, is a bit stiffer than before. The effects will generally be worse the longer your leather was in contact with water if the water was hot/warm the faster the leather dries (so don't dry over a heater!) Normally the stiffness should go away soon if the items are worn/used: after a short ...


8

This can be calculated using a property called cryoscopic constant Kf which links the concentration of a solved substance to the freezing point depression Td: Td = m * Kf where m is the molality which is the amount of mols of solved substance per kg of solvent (here water). For water Kf is 1.86K*kg/mol and the molar mass of sugar (sucrose) is 342g/mol. So ...


7

I often heard this method is reliable and I am also using it. From experience I can say it works. Also if you search the web you will find articles like for example this and this. Also available are color charts to get an visual impression, see e.g.: Besides that personally I know that I am not prone to get headache. So when I start getting slight ...


7

I did a lot of swimming in NW Ontario when I was a kid, and I've spent more time swimming in lakes and rivers than I have in swimming pools. I find the phrasing of this question curious, because I've never heard any one use the words "wild swimming" nor have I ever considered swimming in a mountain lake or a river "wild". None the less, there are some ...


7

As already explained in the other questions, the primary concern is possible contamination. For fresh snow and far from civilization this is very easy to identify: White is good: yellow, brown, ... not so :) Close to roads/industry there might be a non-visible contamination but unlikely to be harmful for occasional consumption (at least in countries with ...


7

How much sea water can I safely drink? = None If you drink sea water, how much fresh water do you need to drink to off set the sea water you drank? = 2.8 units of distilled water per 1 unit of sea water (to neutralize without adding hydration) The "scientific" answer to this question involves a lot of complex math, human physiology and significant ...


6

Two things that haven't been mentioned in addition to the spray action is that Geigerrig has a filter that snaps into the drink tube allowing water to be filtered on-the-go under the pressure from the system. This way you can refill from about anywhere---rivers, streams, etc. Also, the reservoir can be turned inside out and washed in the top shelf of the ...


6

Always surface dive/snorkel first. I have cliff dived in two locations - one is normally deceptive: poor visibility, shadows etc but on visual checks turned out to have 100 ft straight down to a sandy floor; the other looked clear and deep but had rocky ledges at about 20 feet! Considering we dived from 80 - 100 feet, that second location was scary! ...


6

When I'm winter camping I always leave my water in my pot over night, so all I have to do in the morning is turn the stove on and let the ice melt. If I want water for later, I'll typically boil it, then leave it in a good thermos, which will keep it liquid at -15°C for a good 24hrs. Though not very practical, your idea with the bucket will work, just keep ...


6

It's pretty easy to keep your water from freezing without adding anything to it, actually. If you keep it under your shell, your body heat will keep it from freezing. If you bury it under a foot or so of snow, it will stay liquid overnight (although you may get a little ice around the edges). If you boil it and put your hot water bottle in your sleeping bag, ...


6

Yes, you can survive it... if you've got the skills. Not many years ago I watched a film at a mountain film festival, and it was about the first guys to ever kayak the Congo River. They weren't only the first people to kayak the river, they were also the first people to navigate it-and survive. Here's a clip from National Geographic: ...


5

Physically there are two ways for you to heat up the snow: by heat conduction and by heat radiation. Conduction means you place it somewhere close to your body. It does not matter whether this is directly in your mouth or on your belly, you will lose the same amount of energy. The only option to heat it up without losing additional energy is by radiation, ...


5

Is this rust by chance? If so, let it dry and it'll be powdery at the bottom. Run your finger on the surface and some will come off on your finger. If it's rust, you may be able to get it clean with some steel wool. Just make sure to keep it dry after use from then on. SmemSeger could be correct and that it's mineral deposits. I usually find those to be ...


4

When you boil water, the minerals and anything else dissolved in the water will remain and can build up as deposits. This is true for filtered water as well, filters don't really soften your water, they only help remove any particulates and organisms that may be in it. I imagine the brown mineral layer you're getting in you pots is fine silt from your water ...


4

The answer depends a lot on the style of bladder, there are a couple different styles. I have a classic camelbak, which has a nalgene sized opening on it and a handle to hang onto for filling one handed, so it's real quick and easy to stick in the water and fill up: I've had other types of water bladders though that you had to fold the tops over and ...


4

How many percentage does the bacteria in the water die if it is boiled? 100%. More info here: How long does water need to be boiled for to kill all bacteria / viruses? How clean is it after boiling? Is it drinkable? It will still have any dirt, etc., but that isn't necessarily bad for you. Boiling will not get rid of chemical contaminants such as ...


4

The way to get started is to swim in areas that are marked as generally safe. These will typically be a sandy beach on the shores of a small lake. Provincial Parks generally have one of these with float lines marking the "safe" areas. As you can see, you're free to swim outside the lines if you want to. From http://www.ontarioparks.com/park/mikisew There ...


4

There are two natural options; none of them is quite pleasant. Alcohol Per Wikipedia, 8.5 vol% of ethanol make the freezing point drop to -3C (26.6F) (more values at at Wikipedia, also a diagram is available below). Most of the ethanol will be evaporized during cooking, so it's not that much an issue; also 14 vol% is only 6.8 wt%, so the added weight is ...


3

When I have frozen water bottles (usually plastic Nalgene bottles), I melt them by putting them in a pot of hot water. It doesn't take too long to melt the ice to the point you can get it out of the wide-mouth bottle. Then you can just dump the ice into the hot water. (As you get more water in the pot, make sure to ladle it back into bottles so the pot ...


3

Very simply: if you eat snow, all the energy that would be melt the snow is energy currently in your body. Lots of heat loss direct from your body. If you put snow in an outer layer of your clothes, then much of the energy that would melt the snow is energy that was in the process of escaping to the outside air. Effectively the snow is capturing some of ...


3

My standard daypack came with a Camelbak shutoff valve and quick disconnect for the bite valve. I upgraded all my other packs to have the same using Camelbak's HydroLink Filter Adapter kit, which also comes with an endpiece you can put onto a filter hose. This allows me to stop for water and, without removing the bladder from my pack, simply disconnect the ...


3

Propylene glycol is allowed in alcoholic beverages up to 5%, and this would get you to about 29°F. You could probably throw in a little sugar, salt and good old ethanol to kick it down further. Really, nearly any solute will push down the freezing point. Maybe some salty chicken bullion, plus alcohol just to keep it from rotting. This is starting to sound ...


3

Two suggestions. Buy canvas sneakers or tennis shoes, or even those flat soled kungfu shoe style slippers. Leather boat shoes.


2

If you burry your bottle in snow it should be less likely to freeze. The snow is a great insulator and burying the bottle completely should keep the heat from escaping. Essentially you are making a quinsy for you bottle (but much less effort!).



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible