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23

First things first. You do not need to purify all water sources. Just because it is not out of a tap does not make it immediately dirty. Most fresh wilderness water (providing it isn't stagnant, etc.) is fine for drinking. You should be familiar with the source of the water. Just because the river looks clean doesn't mean that an industrial unit isn't ...


12

Don't fill the container. You can't win in a battle against the laws of physics. Water expands when it freezes, so you need to leave some room in your bottle to expand. What I find works best is to fill your bottle just over half, then freeze it on it's side. This will give the ice more room to expand than if you freeze it upright. When you grab your bottle ...


10

You've already mentioned the cons. The advantage of a hydration pack that doesn't require sucking on the tube becomes apparent after slogging up a long, hard hill. Your diaphragm is already exhausted and putting all its energy into pumping your lungs. Putting in the extra effort to create the vacuum necessary to suck water out of a straw suddenly becomes ...


9

How much water you need depends on how big you are, how fit you are, where you are and what you're doing. For example, on Mount Everest, the average person needs to drink 4-5L of water each day just so that their body can function properly. You lose water through your breath, perspiration, urine and bowel movements. If you're a big guy that's out of shape, ...


8

The usual advice to someone in an emergency situation in the wilderness is to stay put, so that it's easier for rescuers to find you. In this situation, performance isn't an issue. There is a folk belief that "thirst is too late," and that people are commonly dehydrated without knowing it. If you believed that, then you might drink some of your water even ...


8

This seems a bit low to me, but there are lots of other factors to consider. The main ones are temperature and exertion/walking speed. Different people also definitely need different amounts of water. One of my friends was nicknamed desert-man as he drank approximately 4x as much as everyone else. If you are in the UK or a similarly cool climate, then 100ml ...


8

You'd be better of strength training your muscles to carry the extra weight of the water you need to carry. How much water an individual needs to stay hydrated is not a standard measure. Different individuals need more or less water to keep their bodies properly hydrated. I don't think it's necessarily wise to try and train your body to do with less of ...


7

I have a very simple reasoning about it. It's only based on personal experience, so don't regard it as absolute truth. Your body needs a certain amount of water to be comfortable, say, N. Comfort here includes urination (removal of poisons from body) and sweating (removal of heat). If you drink N or more, the body will function well. If you drink less than ...


7

Given that your water is clean I don't think cleaning the bottle is a major concern. Personally I would rinse a water bottle out with tap water before filling (or maybe once a day if using it lots) and only bother with soap if visibly dirty. Therefore I would say your suggestion is more than necessary but not excessive. For reference I fill my water bottle ...


7

As someone with +10 years experience as a boyscout, i never had an incident or heard of an incident where cooking with wilderness water led to bacteria infections, sickness, etc. You should take care not to use stagnant water (this was also mentioned in other answers) and I'd personally avoid very shallow streams, to avoid dirt and bacteria from the ground ...


7

I did a lot of swimming in NW Ontario when I was a kid, and I've spent more time swimming in lakes and rivers than I have in swimming pools. I find the phrasing of this question curious, because I've never heard any one use the words "wild swimming" nor have I ever considered swimming in a mountain lake or a river "wild". None the less, there are some ...


7

I often heard this method is reliable and I am also using it. From experience I can say it works. Also if you search the web you will find articles like for example this and this. Also available are color charts to get an visual impression, see e.g.: Besides that personally I know that I am not prone to get headache. So when I start getting slight ...


6

People do not realize that their public water are delivered by iron pipes buried 20 to 80 years ago. I was an engineering student and if you cut those pipes you will see rust around the pipes. So people do not realized that they are drinking water through rusted interior of water pipes. No one has died from it.


6

I clean my drinking system with lots of hot water then sterilise it using baby bottle sterilising tablets. Once it is clean, I don't dry it - I store it in the freezer. :-) Additionally, I don't use anything but water. People I know who use powdered drinks or sugar solution tell me the black mold grows really quickly inside the drinking tube and valve.


6

The literature is mostly pro-drinking and anti-rationing. Hopefully these sources will provide some details for you. The U.S. Army survival manual does not recommend that you drink water only when thirsty, as this leads to under hydrating. Instead, water should be drunk at regular intervals. Even in cold weather: Don't take chances with hydration. Do ...


6

Always surface dive/snorkel first. I have cliff dived in two locations - one is normally deceptive: poor visibility, shadows etc but on visual checks turned out to have 100 ft straight down to a sandy floor; the other looked clear and deep but had rocky ledges at about 20 feet! Considering we dived from 80 - 100 feet, that second location was scary! ...


5

As long as the water you are filling it with is clean, it won't be the problem. What may cause an issue is your mouth. Human mouths are not especially clean, and while microorganisms are kept at bay in the mouth, they can start to multiply rapidly in water. I always recommend washing bottles once a day. As a simple, convenient and quick hygiene step it ...


5

Drain all the water out of the tube Remove the tube from the bladder and the bite valve and hang it up Bend a metal coat hanger in half (make sure no sharp edges are exposed) push the coat hanger into the bladder and hang the coat hanger up You can also buy airers but the coat hanger works just as well. From a cleaning point of view you just need baby ...


5

There are obvious pros and cons. When hiking, I've never come across a situation where I want to have water as quick as possible in a quantity. For me using a hydration pack, on a never-ending ascend, is to make sure that I don't have to stop for long. I can take an optional pause every 200 steps, to sip some water, take a look around, take a picture and ...


5

Two things that haven't been mentioned in addition to the spray action is that Geigerrig has a filter that snaps into the drink tube allowing water to be filtered on-the-go under the pressure from the system. This way you can refill from about anywhere---rivers, streams, etc. Also, the reservoir can be turned inside out and washed in the top shelf of the ...


5

No, 100 ml per hour is way too little in many circumstances. That would mean only 1 l over a 10 hour hike. Anyone that's been on a 10 hour hike, even not in particularly hot or dry weather, can tell you that's not nearly enough. For hiking in hot desert conditions, 1 l per hour (10 times your suggestion) is more like it. I have done significant hiking in ...


5

I found this interesting article on the topic of cold weather and hydration. http://www.unh.edu/news/news_releases/2005/january/sk_050128cold.html In cold weather you lose significant moisture just by breathing the dry air. Even in 100% humidity ( very rare in winter) the cold air can suck moisture from your lungs since it warms up in the lungs and can ...


5

Is this rust by chance? If so, let it dry and it'll be powdery at the bottom. Run your finger on the surface and some will come off on your finger. If it's rust, you may be able to get it clean with some steel wool. Just make sure to keep it dry after use from then on. SmemSeger could be correct and that it's mineral deposits. I usually find those to be ...


4

Rust is not harmful to consume in either form (red or black) Black rust is magnetite and is what makes cast iron cookware black. What is dangerous is being cut by something rusty, and danger has nothing to do with the rust itself. It is simply a great place for tetanus bacteria to live.


4

No you don't. We live in a small Swiss village of 380 inhabitants All the water we use comes from above the village as spring water This is piped to our house and to a village water trough (for animals and humans ) Tourists often ask to drink from our house because the idea of drinking from an outside water source is euuk (yes many are American) However ...


4

When you boil water, the minerals and anything else dissolved in the water will remain and can build up as deposits. This is true for filtered water as well, filters don't really soften your water, they only help remove any particulates and organisms that may be in it. I imagine the brown mineral layer you're getting in you pots is fine silt from your water ...


4

The answer depends a lot on the style of bladder, there are a couple different styles. I have a classic camelbak, which has a nalgene sized opening on it and a handle to hang onto for filling one handed, so it's real quick and easy to stick in the water and fill up: I've had other types of water bladders though that you had to fold the tops over and ...


4

The way to get started is to swim in areas that are marked as generally safe. These will typically be a sandy beach on the shores of a small lake. Provincial Parks generally have one of these with float lines marking the "safe" areas. As you can see, you're free to swim outside the lines if you want to. From http://www.ontarioparks.com/park/mikisew There ...


3

I have traveled the back country for 4-6 weeks a year for 30 years, mostly in the Canadian rockies and on the pre-cambrian shield. I've never used water purification, nor did we generally in our group. We've had some cases of the runs over the years, but the spread out nature made it unlikely it was a water source that did it. Far more likely bad hygiene ...



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