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13

It is likely caused by iron in the pump or pipes. According to the Illinois Department of Public Health: Iron is mainly present in water in two forms: either the soluble ferrous iron or the insoluble ferric iron. Water containing ferrous iron is clear and colorless because the iron is completely dissolved. When exposed to air in the pressure tank or ...


11

The effects of drinking distilled, deminieralized, deionized, and many other forms of water purification have been thoroughly studied and despite the research, the jury is still out on the subject, with regards to temporary usage. As far as adventuring goes, it appears it does not matter, as long as the water you are drinking is microbiologically and ...


10

Filter the water right away, when filling the bottle. This way I'm sure the water inside the bottle is safe for drinking. This. Why? The main point for me is accessibility of that water. If you come to a situation where you need fresh water, then it may not just be because you've set up camp, you've got a while to spare and you feel like a drink. It ...


8

Single use water bottles are nice, like Steed mentioned. I use those a lot. The downside is that most filters don't readily attach to those bottles, which means I often wish I had a third hand when pumping water. Whenever I have space in my pack, I like to use a hydration bladder. You don't have to take your pack off to drink or ask someone else to hand you ...


7

Distilled / deionized (as for lab purposes) water tastes stale. So do reverse-osmosis drinking water, and cooked water: this is attributed mainly to the lack of CO2 / HCO3⁻ compared to fresh ground / tap drinking water. Yes, you can encounter distilled water in outdoor situations. In winter it lies around on the ground as white powder... Lots of people ...


7

This depends greatly on where you will be going and therefore how available water is. Dehydration is a serious issue, so if in doubt bring a little extra. For example, if you're going to be hiking in the Arizona desert in summer, figure you're not going to find any water and you have to bring all that you plan to use. Yes, that could be a lot and it will ...


6

It's also a good idea when camping in freezing weather to pour some water into your cooking pot before going to sleep so that if it freezes overnight it will freeze in the pot rather than the container. It's a lot easier then to melt the ice in the pot rather than the container when you wake up in the morning and want the water for breakfast or a hot drink!


6

If I am using a water-pump filter. Is it necessary to combine this with a water purification tablet? As discussed in this answer and at greater length here, the need to treat backcountry water before drinking it is largely a myth. Neither the filter nor the tablets are needed. You're better off focusing your efforts on avoiding the real reason that ...


6

The bottom line is there is always SOME risk. Whether to take that risk or not is your choice. Fast running + isolated + high elevation = prettttty low risk. With that said the biggest concern is, unless you are drinking right from the source, you have no idea what has happened upstream from you. There could be a dead animal snagged in the stream, animal ...


5

I think your assumptions are correct. To my knowledge in a mountain environment you are quite safe as long as you follow some simple rules, which you mostly already named: The water was not standing, i.e. it comes from a stream that is rather fast and the stream is big enough that it is not just a connection of puddles or ponds where the water rinses ...


4

You can't tell by looking, and it's an issue that occurs naturally, not just because of industrial contamination. Even if you're hiking in a pristine environment like a national park, where this kind of man-made contamination isn't likely to be a concern, there can still be contamination from naturally occurring substances like arsenic. Natural blue-green ...


3

General rule is to be flexible. Small plastic bottle gives you absolutely no flexibility. Big plastic bottle gives you more flexibility. You can fill it fully or only to the half, or one third. Two plastic bottles give you even more flexibility. You can take 0,5l water, you can take 1, 2 or 3 liters - depending how much you will need. 0,5 liter water ...


3

Just as an addition: For treatment and filter, I'd filter first, then treat. For 2 reasons: After a while, filters get alive and things start growing. Most of the chemical treatments work by oxidation. No use spending the oxidation capacity on stuff that can be oxidized, but could have been filtered out anyways.


3

I think the answer is highly personal, as an avid coffee-drinker, hot is for me what scalding might be for someone else. But if I am to give some kind of benchmark, I would say 45°C is a pretty good temperature to aim for. Not as hot as to scald your mouth, but hot enough to give you some warmth if drank in sufficient quantities. But if you want to carry ...


3

According to this article, Avijit Datta and Michael Tipton: Respiratory responses to cold water immersion: neural pathways, interactions, and clinical consequences awake and asleep, A fall in skin temperature elicits a powerful cardiorespiratory response, termed “cold shock,” comprising an initial gasp, hypertension, and hyperventilation despite a ...


3

In my experience, it generally works fine if I simply use cheap, lightweight water bottles (e.g., a 2-liter soda bottle), and put them inside my pack while I'm hiking. The surrounding material in the pack insulates the bottle from the cold air, and my body heats up the pack, so the water doesn't freeze. If the weather is very cold, I can use extra care in ...


3

I recently hiked in the desert in April and drank 8 oz per half hour, which was a pint an hour. That was not enough. I felt like a dried out sponge for a couple days after, and this was only a six hour day hike. I will plan a quart an hour in the future if at all possible, so that means a gallon for every four hours out.


3

Cause of coloring: As you specifically referred to Groundwater, I believe it is most likely due to the Manganese and Iron contents in the water. Iron and manganese are common metallic elements found in the earth's crust. Water percolating through soil and rock can dissolve minerals containing iron and manganese and hold them in solution. Occasionally, ...


3

According to wildwoodsurvival, the sand helps remove suspended particles. Charcoal helps to remove chemical impurities. The charcoal plays the role of active carbon. The water filtration process use multiple materials, from coarse to fine, to prevent clogging. As a last stage, the charcoal can also help remove some bacterias. Note that the author of the ...


2

I used a blow dryer on low setting to dry the bag and tub, and a paper towel pouch (twist tie close) with rice - I figure if it gets moisture out of a cell phone and salt - it ought to work for a Camelback. I also save the little silica gel packets that come in vitamin bottles and new shoe boxes and may try those.


2

I visit AZ every summer and include some hikes in the desert when I'm there. First, don't just take water. That can lead to electrolyte loss, as actually happened to me the first year I did this. Now I dissolve some gatorade powder in the water, and I haven't had that problem since. I usually mix it 1/2 to 2/3 strength relative to what the directions ...


2

Go to your nearest military surplus store and ask if they have any arctic water bottles. These water bottles are made out of aluminum, they are generally round. They are fairly good to hold a lot of water for their size, the water should last about a day or two before we need to be filled (Depending on how much water you drink). They will never freeze. ...


2

Not a direct answer to the question, but something to consider. Reliance cans may be a better purchase, because their taps, while not immune from damage, are easier to repair and improve. This is what we did with ours — short nipple and a quality brass ball valve: Not sure what thread is that (iron pipe or hose thread), but we just had some 3/4" nipple ...


2

Polar pure, the most effective water treatment product availble, is now back in stock and availble for sale on amazon.com I would like to thank everybody for all there support, it was an unfortunately long process due to the "meth heads" that were using iodine, the same chemical used in polar pure, to make crystal meth. This caused the dea to create much ...


2

Polar pure is now back in business and availble for sale on amazon.com


2

I cut new growth back and stick the dripping ends in a container. Sap collects quickly and after filtering through a coffee filter it is absolutely clear and tastes refreshing. Never had any health problems from it and the grapevine doesn't even notice as it's a huge vine. Stay away from the main shoots and just nip the new growth back. The vine actually ...


2

My idea is to keep your thermos bottle full with ice chips, then when thirsty simply dump some of your ice into a small cup then add your beverage! Save as much as you can by returning the unused ice to the thermos for future use. Of course its best to stick with the same beverage, and or water, so flavors don't get mixed if you use the ice again. I still ...


2

Why exactly do you need to carry frozen water? If the temperature is about 0 C, the water will not freeze for a long time anyway. If it is way below 0 C, than you are probably having snow nearby, which you can perfectly use for cooking. You can melt snow during your breakfast, lunch and dinner. If you want to avoid spending time on boiling at lunch, take ...


2

When winter camping I warm up the water on the stove and then keep in my coat--net effect is to warm the body and prevent freezing. I also store some boiled water in a vacuum thermos to save the energy spent on boiling.


2

Distilled water is acidic (pH lower than 7), because it absorbs carbon dioxide from the air. Tap water contains all kinds of salts that act as buffers. The acidity is not dangerous, but can be measured easily with pH paper. It is true that distilled water is surprisingly corrosive and can eat through steel, brass or copper. Maybe a few mm a year, depending ...



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