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10

If you run out half-way, perhaps you should bring twice as much? That being said... One option for day hikes is to hydrate well before hitting the trail. Also, have readily available water for your return. e.g. leave a water bottle in your car. An other option is refilling from natural water sources during the trip would allow you to consume an adequate ...


10

The effects of drinking distilled, deminieralized, deionized, and many other forms of water purification have been thoroughly studied and despite the research, the jury is still out on the subject, with regards to temporary usage. As far as adventuring goes, it appears it does not matter, as long as the water you are drinking is microbiologically and ...


10

Filter the water right away, when filling the bottle. This way I'm sure the water inside the bottle is safe for drinking. This. Why? The main point for me is accessibility of that water. If you come to a situation where you need fresh water, then it may not just be because you've set up camp, you've got a while to spare and you feel like a drink. It ...


8

Single use water bottles are nice, like Steed mentioned. I use those a lot. The downside is that most filters don't readily attach to those bottles, which means I often wish I had a third hand when pumping water. Whenever I have space in my pack, I like to use a hydration bladder. You don't have to take your pack off to drink or ask someone else to hand you ...


7

This depends greatly on where you will be going and therefore how available water is. Dehydration is a serious issue, so if in doubt bring a little extra. For example, if you're going to be hiking in the Arizona desert in summer, figure you're not going to find any water and you have to bring all that you plan to use. Yes, that could be a lot and it will ...


6

If I am using a water-pump filter. Is it necessary to combine this with a water purification tablet? As discussed in this answer and at greater length here, the need to treat backcountry water before drinking it is largely a myth. Neither the filter nor the tablets are needed. You're better off focusing your efforts on avoiding the real reason that ...


6

Leaving aside the questions of water purity, then the answer would be fresh water, no question. Salt water does not lather up many soaps very well, although detergents are a different story. Salt water also does not rinse cleanly, so even those long-distance sailors that use salt and Joy detergent (no corporate affiliation, but lots of online reading) use ...


6

The bottom line is there is always SOME risk. Whether to take that risk or not is your choice. Fast running + isolated + high elevation = prettttty low risk. With that said the biggest concern is, unless you are drinking right from the source, you have no idea what has happened upstream from you. There could be a dead animal snagged in the stream, animal ...


5

It's also a good idea when camping in freezing weather to pour some water into your cooking pot before going to sleep so that if it freezes overnight it will freeze in the pot rather than the container. It's a lot easier then to melt the ice in the pot rather than the container when you wake up in the morning and want the water for breakfast or a hot drink!


5

Maybe not a real way to get water inside your body, but what helps with me is chew on chewing gum. It distracts from the feeling I'm thirsty or drinking too much water without really needing it. Also chewing gum is very light to take with you. Of course the gum is not a substitute for water which is needed anyway.


5

I think your assumptions are correct. To my knowledge in a mountain environment you are quite safe as long as you follow some simple rules, which you mostly already named: The water was not standing, i.e. it comes from a stream that is rather fast and the stream is big enough that it is not just a connection of puddles or ponds where the water rinses ...


4

An additional point that hasn't been mentioned, is when you camp next to a creek or stream the water level can quickly change, sometimes by quite a bit. It can be sunny where you are camped but heavy rain miles upstream from you, and the raising water level could wash away half of your camp while you sleep.


4

Distilled / deionized (as for lab purposes) water tastes stale. So do reverse-osmosis drinking water, and cooked water: this is attributed mainly to the lack of CO2 / HCO3⁻ compared to fresh ground / tap drinking water. Yes, you can encounter distilled water in outdoor situations. In winter it lies around on the ground as white powder... Lots of people ...


4

You can't tell by looking, and it's an issue that occurs naturally, not just because of industrial contamination. Even if you're hiking in a pristine environment like a national park, where this kind of man-made contamination isn't likely to be a concern, there can still be contamination from naturally occurring substances like arsenic. Natural blue-green ...


3

General rule is to be flexible. Small plastic bottle gives you absolutely no flexibility. Big plastic bottle gives you more flexibility. You can fill it fully or only to the half, or one third. Two plastic bottles give you even more flexibility. You can take 0,5l water, you can take 1, 2 or 3 liters - depending how much you will need. 0,5 liter water ...


3

Just as an addition: For treatment and filter, I'd filter first, then treat. For 2 reasons: After a while, filters get alive and things start growing. Most of the chemical treatments work by oxidation. No use spending the oxidation capacity on stuff that can be oxidized, but could have been filtered out anyways.


3

I think the answer is highly personal, as an avid coffee-drinker, hot is for me what scalding might be for someone else. But if I am to give some kind of benchmark, I would say 45°C is a pretty good temperature to aim for. Not as hot as to scald your mouth, but hot enough to give you some warmth if drank in sufficient quantities. But if you want to carry ...


3

In my experience, it generally works fine if I simply use cheap, lightweight water bottles (e.g., a 2-liter soda bottle), and put them inside my pack while I'm hiking. The surrounding material in the pack insulates the bottle from the cold air, and my body heats up the pack, so the water doesn't freeze. If the weather is very cold, I can use extra care in ...


3

I recently hiked in the desert in April and drank 8 oz per half hour, which was a pint an hour. That was not enough. I felt like a dried out sponge for a couple days after, and this was only a six hour day hike. I will plan a quart an hour in the future if at all possible, so that means a gallon for every four hours out.


2

I used a blow dryer on low setting to dry the bag and tub, and a paper towel pouch (twist tie close) with rice - I figure if it gets moisture out of a cell phone and salt - it ought to work for a Camelback. I also save the little silica gel packets that come in vitamin bottles and new shoe boxes and may try those.


2

I visit AZ every summer and include some hikes in the desert when I'm there. First, don't just take water. That can lead to electrolyte loss, as actually happened to me the first year I did this. Now I dissolve some gatorade powder in the water, and I haven't had that problem since. I usually mix it 1/2 to 2/3 strength relative to what the directions ...


2

Go to your nearest military surplus store and ask if they have any arctic water bottles. These water bottles are made out of aluminum, they are generally round. They are fairly good to hold a lot of water for their size, the water should last about a day or two before we need to be filled (Depending on how much water you drink). They will never freeze. ...


2

I have gone through several filters, and have cleaned them many times. There are a few steps to doing this though. What you'll need... muriatic acid, 2 buckets, long plastic stirrer, face mask, high pressure hose, safety glasses, heavy duty gloves, water, and your filter Move to a well ventilated area. Outside is best. Begin by putting half a gallon of ...


2

You should never plan to not purify. Levels of contamination will depend on the location. A stream running by a pasture 50 miles upstream will possibly contain more contaminants than ocean, even if the ocean (on average) is worse. If you have a way to purify, then purify! If you can't purify, consider heating your dishes over a flame afterwards until ...


2

Not a direct answer to the question, but something to consider. Reliance cans may be a better purchase, because their taps, while not immune from damage, are easier to repair and improve. This is what we did with ours — short nipple and a quality brass ball valve: Not sure what thread is that (iron pipe or hose thread), but we just had some 3/4" nipple ...


2

If you still have your PolarPur bottle you can purchase crystal iodine off of ebay. Look for this seller, "ibmsuccess2010", he sells and ships from Lithuania. I place a quarter teaspoon of the iodine back into the PolarPur bottle and it will work like new. The seller packages and ships very discreetly. The amount if crystal iodine you will get will probably ...


2

I currently use a Sawyer Filter without using purification. I carry iodine tablets as a backup. Iodine's been in use for decades, and I don't worry at all about using them when necessary. Ray J. recommends being smart about choosing your water sources, which I am. When I was a kid I drank straight from the streams without any purification or any problems, so ...


2

According to this article, Avijit Datta and Michael Tipton: Respiratory responses to cold water immersion: neural pathways, interactions, and clinical consequences awake and asleep, A fall in skin temperature elicits a powerful cardiorespiratory response, termed “cold shock,” comprising an initial gasp, hypertension, and hyperventilation despite a ...


2

Use common plastic bottles from sparkling beverages. They are lightweight. When they are empty, they can be smashed thin and take almost no space (you can do the same which a half full bottle, pushing out all the air). When you need them again, you inflate them back with water. So you can have a good reserve volume, which costs you nothing when empty. You ...


2

I use a Sawyer Squeeze filter and its pretty quick, light, and easy. You fill up a pouch that looks like a big Capri Sun and then just squeeze it out through the filter into your bottle or bladder. It comes with both a filter cap and a regular bottle cap, so if you were in a hurry you could fill the pouch at the water source, cap it, and filter it later. ...



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