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26

First, you won't need to make this observation if you routinely drink when you stop to rest, and if you eat something at least slightly salty whenever you snack (if your snacks include jerky or salted nuts you're more than covered.) Second, pay attention to your thirst. Many of us ignore our bodies for hours at a time - postponing bodily functions during a ...


24

As a former soldier (and Medic), I personally don't flavour my water during the outdoors. The contents of the canteen/flask might be required for a non-drinking purpose such as: Eyewash Rinsing Medical Cleaning etc However, I do flavour my water on a day-to-day basis for the gym etc using super-concentrate micro capsules such as Squash'd If you have ...


23

First things first. You do not need to purify all water sources. Just because it is not out of a tap does not make it immediately dirty. Most fresh wilderness water (providing it isn't stagnant, etc.) is fine for drinking. You should be familiar with the source of the water. Just because the river looks clean doesn't mean that an industrial unit isn't ...


21

Dehydration occurs when there is more water going out or being used than is going in. Additionally, if you're drinking too fast (more than a litre an hour for an average adult male), you're not absorbing the water and so it doesn't count as going in. Confusingly, dehydration can also be classified loss of water, loss of electrolytes or loss of both. To add ...


15

The symptoms of dehydration and over-hydration are similar, and this can lead to occasional mistreatment. Symptoms common to both include headaches, confusion, loss of appetite, irritability, nausea and vomiting, muscle weakness, muscle cramps, and seizures. With the popularity of sports drinks and staying hydrated, exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) ...


12

Don't fill the container. You can't win in a battle against the laws of physics. Water expands when it freezes, so you need to leave some room in your bottle to expand. What I find works best is to fill your bottle just over half, then freeze it on it's side. This will give the ice more room to expand than if you freeze it upright. When you grab your bottle ...


10

Colour if urine is a good indicator. The lighter the colour, the better your hydration is. Once you start to feel thirsty, you are already dehydrated.


10

Do a google search for urine colour (or color) chart and you will find many charts showing examples of what your urine should look like when you are hydrated. or not. Here is a slightly more humourous version but shows the principle:


10

You've already mentioned the cons. The advantage of a hydration pack that doesn't require sucking on the tube becomes apparent after slogging up a long, hard hill. Your diaphragm is already exhausted and putting all its energy into pumping your lungs. Putting in the extra effort to create the vacuum necessary to suck water out of a straw suddenly becomes ...


9

There are a lot of myths about water and dehydration: http://www.lightandmatter.com/article/hiking_water.html . One of these is the belief that people are in danger of being dehydrated without knowing it. Dehydration is a serious medical condition that sets in long after thirst, and thirst is a powerful sensation that commands your attention. When people say ...


9

Tree's generate water as part of the respiration process (not to be confused with photosynthesis which is different). This happens at night and day. This is relatively static day or night. Photosynthesis alters dependant on sunlight, respiration (being the process of producing energy) does not. Respiration will alter dependant on the time of year, i.e. ...


9

How much water you need depends on how big you are, how fit you are, where you are and what you're doing. For example, on Mount Everest, the average person needs to drink 4-5L of water each day just so that their body can function properly. You lose water through your breath, perspiration, urine and bowel movements. If you're a big guy that's out of shape, ...


8

The usual advice to someone in an emergency situation in the wilderness is to stay put, so that it's easier for rescuers to find you. In this situation, performance isn't an issue. There is a folk belief that "thirst is too late," and that people are commonly dehydrated without knowing it. If you believed that, then you might drink some of your water even ...


8

This seems a bit low to me, but there are lots of other factors to consider. The main ones are temperature and exertion/walking speed. Different people also definitely need different amounts of water. One of my friends was nicknamed desert-man as he drank approximately 4x as much as everyone else. If you are in the UK or a similarly cool climate, then 100ml ...


8

You'd be better of strength training your muscles to carry the extra weight of the water you need to carry. How much water an individual needs to stay hydrated is not a standard measure. Different individuals need more or less water to keep their bodies properly hydrated. I don't think it's necessarily wise to try and train your body to do with less of ...


7

You really don't need equipment as such. There are quite a few symptoms that you can observe, may be at a gradual rising rate. Symptoms are observed with as the degree of Dehydration gets worst. Normal: (I'll say recoverable without having to stop the venture then and there itself. One can continue only if he/she can start hydrating himself/herself ...


7

In my experience, it can be hard to tell the two apart, plus there is also ketosis to worry about. If you are exercising vigorously (cycling, running, vigorous climbing, etc.) for several hours and not eating much, you can consume all of the readily-available glucose in the body and begin burning protein instead. A waste product of burning protein in this ...


7

Few things I do: bring tea. bring water flavoring packets, like Crystal Light or Propel. bring coffee or instant coffee. know your surrounding vegetation and make tea out of different plants, leaves, and/or roots. Emphasis on knowing your surrounding vegetation; make sure you know which plants (or parts of plants) are suitable for consumption.


7

I preferably avoid artificial materials, so I would use lemon, orange or grapefruit juice, just a bit for the taste, not really making lemonade (although it might irritate your stomach after several days of drinking it). Crushed herb leaves can also give a new taste to the already "boring" water - for this purpose I would use mint, wild thyme, basil or ...


7

As someone with +10 years experience as a boyscout, i never had an incident or heard of an incident where cooking with wilderness water led to bacteria infections, sickness, etc. You should take care not to use stagnant water (this was also mentioned in other answers) and I'd personally avoid very shallow streams, to avoid dirt and bacteria from the ground ...


7

I have a very simple reasoning about it. It's only based on personal experience, so don't regard it as absolute truth. Your body needs a certain amount of water to be comfortable, say, N. Comfort here includes urination (removal of poisons from body) and sweating (removal of heat). If you drink N or more, the body will function well. If you drink less than ...


7

Given that your water is clean I don't think cleaning the bottle is a major concern. Personally I would rinse a water bottle out with tap water before filling (or maybe once a day if using it lots) and only bother with soap if visibly dirty. Therefore I would say your suggestion is more than necessary but not excessive. For reference I fill my water bottle ...


7

I did a lot of swimming in NW Ontario when I was a kid, and I've spent more time swimming in lakes and rivers than I have in swimming pools. I find the phrasing of this question curious, because I've never heard any one use the words "wild swimming" nor have I ever considered swimming in a mountain lake or a river "wild". None the less, there are some ...


7

I often heard this method is reliable and I am also using it. From experience I can say it works. Also if you search the web you will find articles like for example this and this. Also available are color charts to get an visual impression, see e.g.: Besides that personally I know that I am not prone to get headache. So when I start getting slight ...


6

That is a very tricky question... Pure water is the best for everything. There are lots of things you can use to add some taste and make it easy to drink but there are some considerations about that as well. For sure those electrolytes are the best options but they are not cheap. In a camping trip, where exercise is not the focus, all those already said, ...


6

I asked my fitness instructor this question a few years ago. She had several things to say. Electrolyte replacement is for when you have been in a high cardio, sweating mode continually for an hour or more. Endurance runners and cyclists, yes. Gym bunnies, trampers, walkers, no. Very few things on the market are actually true electrolyte replacement. ...


6

According to wildwoodsurvival, the sand helps remove suspended particles. Charcoal helps to remove chemical impurities. The charcoal plays the role of active carbon. The water filtration process use multiple materials, from coarse to fine, to prevent clogging. As a last stage, the charcoal can also help remove some bacterias. Note that the author of the ...


6

People do not realize that their public water are delivered by iron pipes buried 20 to 80 years ago. I was an engineering student and if you cut those pipes you will see rust around the pipes. So people do not realized that they are drinking water through rusted interior of water pipes. No one has died from it.


6

I clean my drinking system with lots of hot water then sterilise it using baby bottle sterilising tablets. Once it is clean, I don't dry it - I store it in the freezer. :-) Additionally, I don't use anything but water. People I know who use powdered drinks or sugar solution tell me the black mold grows really quickly inside the drinking tube and valve.


6

The literature is mostly pro-drinking and anti-rationing. Hopefully these sources will provide some details for you. The U.S. Army survival manual does not recommend that you drink water only when thirsty, as this leads to under hydrating. Instead, water should be drunk at regular intervals. Even in cold weather: Don't take chances with hydration. Do ...



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