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6

Yes, you can survive it... if you've got the skills. Not many years ago I watched a film at a mountain film festival, and it was about the first guys to ever kayak the Congo River. They weren't only the first people to kayak the river, they were also the first people to navigate it-and survive. Here's a clip from National Geographic: ...


17

It depends very much on the specific geography. But the idea of "whirlpools" that suck down people or entire ships, never to be seen again (which I suspect is what fascinates you) is largely a myth. The dangers aren't any different (and typically much smaller) than those posed by whitewater rapids in rivers. Specific dangers are: Being knocked against ...


2

I would say no, because according to records, the strait is not even considered navigable except during short periods of slack tide. Does that mean a person couldn't survive? No certainly not, but I wouldn't bet my own life to try.


1

Electrolytes You can use an electrolyte solution in your water. Many do this for obvious other reasons but it will reduce the freezing point in the water. I'm sure you've seen the various powders at health food or supplement stores. I wish I had a good citation but sodium (Na+), potassium (K+), calcium (Ca2+), magnesium (Mg2+), chloride (Cl−), hydrogen ...


4

There are two natural options; none of them is quite pleasant. Alcohol Per Wikipedia, 8.5 vol% of ethanol make the freezing point drop to -3C (26.6F) (more values at at Wikipedia, also a diagram is available below). Most of the ethanol will be evaporized during cooking, so it's not that much an issue; also 14 vol% is only 6.8 wt%, so the added weight is ...


3

Two suggestions. Buy canvas sneakers or tennis shoes, or even those flat soled kungfu shoe style slippers. Leather boat shoes.


3

Propylene glycol is allowed in alcoholic beverages up to 5%, and this would get you to about 29°F. You could probably throw in a little sugar, salt and good old ethanol to kick it down further. Really, nearly any solute will push down the freezing point. Maybe some salty chicken bullion, plus alcohol just to keep it from rotting. This is starting to sound ...


6

It's pretty easy to keep your water from freezing without adding anything to it, actually. If you keep it under your shell, your body heat will keep it from freezing. If you bury it under a foot or so of snow, it will stay liquid overnight (although you may get a little ice around the edges). If you boil it and put your hot water bottle in your sleeping bag, ...


3

When I have frozen water bottles (usually plastic Nalgene bottles), I melt them by putting them in a pot of hot water. It doesn't take too long to melt the ice to the point you can get it out of the wide-mouth bottle. Then you can just dump the ice into the hot water. (As you get more water in the pot, make sure to ladle it back into bottles so the pot ...


9

This can be calculated using a property called cryoscopic constant Kf which links the concentration of a solved substance to the freezing point depression Td: Td = m * Kf where m is the molality which is the amount of mols of solved substance per kg of solvent (here water). For water Kf is 1.86K*kg/mol and the molar mass of sugar (sucrose) is 342g/mol. So ...


6

When I'm winter camping I always leave my water in my pot over night, so all I have to do in the morning is turn the stove on and let the ice melt. If I want water for later, I'll typically boil it, then leave it in a good thermos, which will keep it liquid at -15°C for a good 24hrs. Though not very practical, your idea with the bucket will work, just keep ...



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