Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

I've wild-camped a few times in NL without problems. I guess it all depends on how well you hide and where you are. Can't really help for rural area's. But in less rural areas: Laundry: I'd expect laundry facilities for a few euro's in the poorer neighborhood of cities. Where students or immigrants live. Water/shower: some truck stops/gasoline stations ...


2

First of all, in the Netherlands camping in the wild is prohibited, and they really don't like it. Now you're in need for some water, first the good news, tapwater in the netherlands is filtered and ready to drink but like you said, you won't find much public water because of the expenses that are needed to get the water to a fountain (you have no ...


0

If you're worried about the safety of iodine or don't like the terrible taste, you could get some chlorine tablets. They cost about the same, but aren't as easy to find at general sports stores.


1

I bought a water reservoir cleaning kit for about $7 from Walmart. Disclaimer: I haven't used it yet (I only got it a month or two ago. I haven't gone on a longer hike where I wanted to go to the effort of filling a water reservoir, instead of just bringing a little bottle). http://www.walmart.com/ip/Outdoor-Products-Hydro-Cleaning-Kit/17017907 It came ...


2

I have traveled the back country for 4-6 weeks a year for 30 years, mostly in the Canadian rockies and on the pre-cambrian shield. I've never used water purification, nor did we generally in our group. We've had some cases of the runs over the years, but the spread out nature made it unlikely it was a water source that did it. Far more likely bad hygiene ...


1

Here is a few videos on how you can clean your hydration pack. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T7KZlSuc0t0 And a further list of other ways to clean the bladder and straw https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=how+to+clean+and+dry+hydration+bladders


6

As someone with +10 years experience as a boyscout, i never had an incident or heard of an incident where cooking with wilderness water led to bacteria infections, sickness, etc. You should take care not to use stagnant water (this was also mentioned in other answers) and I'd personally avoid very shallow streams, to avoid dirt and bacteria from the ground ...


3

No you don't. We live in a small Swiss village of 380 inhabitants All the water we use comes from above the village as spring water This is piped to our house and to a village water trough (for animals and humans ) Tourists often ask to drink from our house because the idea of drinking from an outside water source is euuk (yes many are American) However ...


0

Yes you can but the question you need to ask yourself is should you ? If the water is dirty it will contaminate the egg (some toxins are horribly bad for you) Most fresh (flowing) spring water is VERY clean if above human habitation areas


21

First things first. You do not need to purify all water sources. Just because it is not out of a tap does not make it immediately dirty. Most fresh wilderness water (providing it isn't stagnant, etc.) is fine for drinking. You should be familiar with the source of the water. Just because the river looks clean doesn't mean that an industrial unit isn't ...


6

I clean my drinking system with lots of hot water then sterilise it using baby bottle sterilising tablets. Once it is clean, I don't dry it - I store it in the freezer. :-) Additionally, I don't use anything but water. People I know who use powdered drinks or sugar solution tell me the black mold grows really quickly inside the drinking tube and valve.


5

Drain all the water out of the tube Remove the tube from the bladder and the bite valve and hang it up Bend a metal coat hanger in half (make sure no sharp edges are exposed) push the coat hanger into the bladder and hang the coat hanger up You can also buy airers but the coat hanger works just as well. From a cleaning point of view you just need baby ...



Top 50 recent answers are included