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7

Use an ammunition box - commonly found at Army/Navy surplus stores or on eBay/Craiglist for ~$10 USD, depending on the caliber size of the box. .50 caliber boxes are larger than, say, 30 caliber. Waterproof, cheap, and very durable. Another option is to use Tupperware or something similar if a smaller size is desired. Buy higher-end containers that ...


6

The chemical coating on the outside when new is what is commonly known as DWR and chemically known as a Fluoropolymer. Fluoropolymer is a fluorocarbon based polymer with multiple strong carbon–fluorine bonds. It is characterized by a high resistance to solvents, acids, and bases. This is the same chemical treatment used on all water resistant fabrics. ...


6

The first commandment of leather care is to never let your boots dry too quickly, for example on direct sun or next to a source of heat. The leather could crack or shrink. You have to let them dry slowly. Second, you should use something to keep the leather in good shape. There are tons of products for this, so pick a dependable outdoors brand and use what ...


5

As a rough guide to waterproofness - 5000mm is generally rainproof but won't necessarily stand up well to torrential rain. Around 15000 should be fine in that context. If you go higher than that then you're looking at fabric that can be immersed in water and still stay waterproof for a while, but should be ample for any rain shower that might come along! ...


4

I have camped in a tent with a similar rain fly - it was fine in gentle rain, and I found it amusing in a force 8 gale with lashing rain - because it leaked about 11 litres of rain into the tent overnight (so my middle daughter ended up a bit damp) My wife wasn't so keen, as she had never camped in storms before. I found it okay - if you don't like water in ...


4

From my experience, water resistant means that the item will survive a splash of water but not any form of prolonged exposure. Water proof suggest that it is Impervious to or unaffected by water. For waterproof items, there is often an IP number provided which helps you understand the level of waterproofness the item offers. IP codes are widely used ...


3

"Waterproof" means that no water will penetrate. "Water resistant" means that there exists a limit of exposure at which water will penetrate. Watches are normally water resistant to a particular depth below which the water pressure is too high and the seals are breached. Breathable clothing quite of often states some comparable metric indicating, for ...


3

I'm not a native speaker, but being waterproof suggests more endurance to water than being only water-resistance. But linguistic nuances doesn't make law. More important is, what are the norms and regulations about using such definitions, in the country where that equipment is produced or sold. If there are such regulations, false promises may make ...


3

From the Nikwax link you provide: For best results remove all non-washable parts and always clean item(s) first with Nikwax Tech Wash®. No need to dry item(s) before waterproofing. Protect working surface and lay clean wet fastened garment flat. Hold bottle 15 cm/6 inches away from garment. Apply evenly to outside of fabric. Wait for ...


3

After considering the existing answers and doing some additional research, here's my take: Spray-on waterproofing Spray on waterproofing should be used on Multi layer garments. You only want to treat the outer layer which reduces the chance that it will be 'wetting out' quickly, which allows the inner membrane to maintain it's porous properties. I've ...


2

From the Nikwax website: Wash-In "For the convenience of a wash-in product try: TX.Direct® Wash-In" Spray-On "For non-machine washable items or those with wicking linings use: TX.Direct® Spray-On"


1

To emphasize what Liam and Paul hinted at, in all likelihood, too much nikwax wash-in and the like could potentially act against gore-tex by blocking the pores and preventing the fabric from breathing ( thus soaking in your own sweat ). What gore-text primarily recommends on their site and what I've had more success with is simply tumble drying the garment ...


1

It's hard to know what it is about that picture you consider partial. Is it the triangular opening through which you can see the door? Or, more significantly in my opinion, the fact that the fly doesn't come down to the ground? My tent is an Alpine Meadows. It looks like this: (picture from a classified ad.) I have been using it for over 30 years. We ...


1

Well by the looks of it, It'll hold up in a bid of rain, but no downpour or any hard wind. Plus side on this tent is that the rain fly will keep some direct sunlight of of the inner tent. And it looks like the front "door" of the tent is made of something that might be water proof. Now what you're gonna want to do (and you should do this periodically with ...



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