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10

The whole thing comes down to weight, if your setup can displace more than its weight then it will float, those jeeps were made to be very light. You could be in the situation where your "wrapped car" could float but its so deep in the water you wont be able to move it anywhere (or you would need an huge canvas and a mean to hold it in deep water as much as ...


7

Ok to address your question: Can I use a plastic blue tarp to float my vehicle over water? Yes Limits and Considerations: WILL YOU FLOAT? First off I will describe the physics of the floating car. The force of buoyancy acting on your car must be greater than the force of gravity pulling it down. The equation for buoyancy is this . Where Fb is the force ...


6

Based solely on the video you provided the link to, and my experience with blue thick tarp, I have a few things to address. I don't know what kind of tarpaulin you have, how heavy your vehicle is, and how deep is the river/pond/lake you're trying to cross through. Despite that, there are a few things you should keep in mind. You should make sure that your ...


6

Silpoly is based on polyester, which means it's hydrophobic (doesn't absorb water). Not all slippery materials are hydrophobic, but this definitely factors in. Silicone sealant also repels water, but through different properties. Those different properties are also the ones that let it adhere to many different surfaces. Silicone has a high coefficient of ...


6

If its true canvas (cotton) and its leaking its pretty much past its best before date and replacement is the most reliable solution. Good news is Canvas takes water proofing products well and as long as its not rotten, should last you a many more seasons with the occasional re coat. Its been a long time since I have had to do a tent or similar. Its best to ...


6

The answer to this will depend on the material your applying it to. Waterproofs typically fall into one of three categories: Physical waterproof barriers These are the old style "boil in the bag" type systems where your coated in plastic. This plastic will neither let water in or out. These are rarely used these days. VLP will have zero affect on these as ...


4

I'm not a materials scientist, so can't give you a definitive answer. But I do know that if you make your own silnylon or silpoly by soaking the base fabric in a solution of silicone and mineral spirit and air-drying, the final material is far less slippery than commercial silnylon/silpoly. So it seems that the slippery finish of the commercial materials ...


4

It's hard to tell without all the details. As a rule of thumb I'd apply whatever was applied to the coat originally. If it didn't have a coating at all then the waterproof spray is likely the best option. The spray is likely going to produce the best result. Wax can discolour and make a jacket stiff. These day's wax is only used on "wax jacket" type coats. ...


3

In addition to previous answers: Consider the center of mass. The "modern" car usually are quite front heavy (quite often the engine, gearbox, clutch etc. are all in the front) in contrary to the depicted jeeps. That means a "modern" car will by no means float as level as the depicted one, even if you have enough lift.


3

Actually, contrary to what alot of people are saying, the wash-in treatment wont block pores of multi-layer fabrics (unless its REALLY dirty) The chemicals used are designed to break down particulates as small as possible. The 'wash-in' also doesnt do a whole lot of actual waterproofing on the facbic, since its soaked in water itself. It simply removes dirt ...


1

If your tarp is heavy duty enough, I'd expect it to work. Most blue plastic tarps are fairly thin and weak, so while it might work, it would be risky. The difficulty is that you will be abrading the tarp by driving onto it, probably subjecting it to abrasion from rubbing against the jeep's body, and risking the tarp catching on underwater debris. The ...



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