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13

I was caught by a hailstorm the weekend before last. I was high above the tree line, the nearest trees were perhaps 20 km away, and several hours hiking from shelter. The hailstones were not huge, but large enough to hurt. Hail north of Rássevárri, above Guovdelisjávri, Narvik, Norway. There's only one place to hide: under my backpack. A backpack ...


11

Here's a lot more advice than you aked for: Around 24000 people in the entire world are struck by lightning each year. Supposing you live to be 85, that's 2 million people in your lifetime. On 7 billion people alive today, that's a lifetime chance of 1 in 3500 -- your chances are pretty slim anyway :) But, to be more elaborate: your chances of being ...


11

Sandstorms (or, here in the southwestern part of the US, dust storms) impair the ability to see and breath. The winds also carry heavier debris. Because the storms often occur when it is hot, the wind can contribute to dehydration. The reverse is also true--cold, winter dust storms occur in some places, and hypothermia can become an issue. Fortunately, ...


10

I strongly recommend you purchase, borrow, or possibly rent a proper ski jacket and pants. Given that you don't have a ski jacket I'm guessing that you are a relative beginner. It is likely that you might be falling down quite a bit. One thing to consider is does your jacket give you good mobility? If it does not, you could very easily expose your waist ...


10

Yes, "Nor'easter" is derived from "north-easter" meaning the winds come from the northeast. That is exactly what happens in a nor'easter. You are confusing the wind direction with the travel direction of the storm. The whole storm moves up the coast, but remember these are counter-clockwise rotation cyclonic storms. The winds that bring the most stuff ...


7

In a sense, yes. While mountains don't literally "make their own weather," they do sometimes provide additional catalysts to create localized disturbances which you might otherwise characterize as "weather" (thunderstorms, clouds, rain, etc). In a broader global sense, weather events occur when masses of air with differing characteristics suddenly collide. ...


7

Wind chill factors verge on being junk science, especially when interpreted uncritically. However, your physical intuition does make sense, and published formulas and tables do have a property very much like the one you have in mind: as the wind speed increases, the incremental effect of adding a given amount to the wind speed gets smaller and smaller. For ...


6

Personally, I would use a wind chill chart, e.g this keyring compass includes a wind chill chart that would be easy to carry. It's still not going to be accurate, but it would provide a guide when you have nothing better. Take a look at the Wikipedia page on wind chill, the calculations look a bit "frightening" - not something I would like to do in my head. ...


6

One of the big reasons that we seem to be 'caught' by the weather when we're on the mountain is that the mountain forces otherwise harmless air to ascend and condense. As the warm and moist air is forced to ascend the mountain, the air quickly cools and reaches its dew point, water droplets form and a vicious cycle is set in motion. This is especially true ...


5

There is no such place. 40-60°F is a very narrow range. 20°F can be just from day and night variation, which leaves basically nothing for seasonal variation. Even if you meant daytime highs, I still don't think there is any place on earth that fits this description, let alone anywhere in the US. Let's flip this around and think of what would make ...


5

You can use IFTTT (If This, Then That). You can use it to create your own rules to check the weather for you and then email or even text you with a link and what kind of condition changes. For example, mine is set to email me whenever there is more than X change in temperature, or if it is going to specifically rain/snow or have something out of the blue ...


5

USGS: http://waterwatch.usgs.gov/index.php?r=us&id=ww_current National Weather Service Map: http://water.weather.gov/ahps2/index.php?wfo=ffc This is an easy to read table for GA, but I can't figure out how to navigate to other states on their site: http://www.srh.noaa.gov/ffc/html/rva.php More NOAA for the Colorado Basin: http://www.cbrfc.noaa.gov/ ...


4

There are many wave height buoys along the Atlantic sea board and would allow for much better prediction than weather system prediction. There are some good resource for surf forecasting on the east coast such as http://www.surfguru.com/ (no affiliation) which is focused on Florida but does provide information up through SC.


4

It really depends on a lot of different factors. If it is a warm winter day I go sometimes skiing without any jacket just wearing a thick pullover. But during the same winter and at the same ski resort it can also be very cold. E.g. -20 degrees and a lot of wind so that the wind chill factor also plays an important role. When it is this cold I'm even ...


4

There are a variety of important features that your leather jacket will lack compared to a ski jacket. Borrowing or buying a ski jacket from a thrift shop would definitely be worth it. Skiing is pretty physically intense. If it's not very cold (above 20?), you'll sweat, and most ski jackets don't actually have much insulation as they're designed to block as ...


4

This isn't pretty, and seems to be somewhat limited in locations (I couldn't get it to work for my area) but this looks to have potential. Though there is no "subscribe" feature. National Weather Service Weather Activity Planner (Example)


4

There's no such site that I know of, but there's a couple of alternatives that may suit your needs: Google calendar has an add on you can enable which shows the weather as an icon by the next few days. I find this quite useful (obviously it depends if you use Google calendar!) There's a few websites which will do a general email newsletter. While you want ...


4

No there is no limit to the math of wind chill, though there is a maximum wind speed that has ever been observed. Here is what wind chill is. Imagine you have a hot cup of coffee. You can leave it at room temperature for a while and it will cool down to where you can drink it. Or, you can put it in the fridge and it will cool faster. Or put it in the ...


3

The only one on your list that is no fun when wet is the Golden Gate visit. The following are all do-able on foot - I used the trolley cars as part of my exploration when I went to see the following: The trolley car to fisherman's wharf is a good idea. The Coit Tower is good for a walk around Haight-Ashbury can be fun for a half day or so Lombard Street ...


3

I don't think you will get consistent 40-60 daytime highs (what I assumed you meant) anywhere that isn't moderated by the ocean. However Fiasco is correct: The Olympic Penninsula around Sequim is very close. Summer temps are cool enough that tomatoes won't rippen outside of a greenhouse. Winter has frosts, but not consitently. The mountains nearby get ...


3

The German Wikipedia article on thermals is also quite nice (better than the English). In higher latitudes the sun shines closer to orthogonal on the sun side of a mountain face. Compared to a flat landscape more heat is transfered to the air immediately above the surface, and it starts flowing up. Not necessarily directly vertical, but if the soil/rock is ...


3

This question has been answered already, but this problem interested me and I thought I'd share for future readers what I found by playing around with it. The North American Wind Chill Index as presented by NOAA here is based on the formula (itself an approximation), The chart applies to temperatures T from 40F to -45F and wind speeds 5mph to 60mph, and ...


3

I know very about kitesurfing, so I did some research on it. Please look at some of the resources I used instead of taking what I say for granted. I hope that I can provide a simple baseline, and those who know more or want to know more can continue the process. Most of the information below is summarized, paraphrased, or quoted from this site: ...


3

Your understanding of wind-chill is a bit confused. The reason the wind feels colder is because of convective heat transfer. When there is a difference in temperature between two objects, thermal energy transfers from the hot to the cold. In the case of a person in the air, the thermal energy flows into the air, and the faster the air is moving, the more ...


2

The usual method, and actually the one meteorological offices use the world over is to run multiple models with slightly different parameters. When all the outputs show generally the same result they have confidence in the forecast, and when they come up with different results they have low confidence. They say this on weather reports, often giving %age ...


2

I have skied at high altitude in only a pair of surf shorts, and acquired a nice tan, but that was in zero wind and perfectly blue skies. In general the benefits of a dedicated ski jacket include: wind protection - your leather jacket will give you this elastication round wrists, neck and waist to prevent snow, and sometimes zips to connect to salopettes ...


2

I don't believe there's an easy way of doing it. I used to live in a hilly area and was able to forecast the weather based on where the thunder was coming from, the wind, the smell in the air, the type of surrounding light, cloud cover. Since I moved in the mountains, the signs have changed a lot. But if you know the land features from the surrounding ...


2

Relative humidity is doing to be a big factor here, both on the too wet and too dry sides. Staying warm is generally not something you want to try to do "by the numbers". If you're out in the cold and wind, you need to pay attention to the feedback your body is giving you about the conditions you are in. Pay attention for the signs of hypothermia, ...


1

Here in California, our mountains influence our weather in a particular way. We have a Mediterranean climate and big mountain ranges inland. Storms build up out on the Pacific, and they blow in toward the land. Often they hold their moisture until they get to the mountains, at which point they dump it. For this reason, the seaward sides of our mountains tend ...


1

I always keep a folded parka or thick contractor garbage bag in the bottom of my pack - rain or shine. My pack is designed such that I can get into the bottom through a zipper quickly. Find any way to suspend it above you. Put two sticks in it on the sides and hold the sticks up. Or I prefer to tie/tuck one end on the top of my pack and hold it up the ...



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