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20

For tents that erect outer first, pitching in the rain is no different to any other time, just don't leave the dry inner out in the rain while putting the outer up. The outer will get wet on both sides anyway. To make this easier a bit of forward planning is useful, like pack the inner and outer separately so that you can just leave the inner in the car ...


20

There are all kinds of people who put up the fly first, then crouch under it putting up the inside. It's generally a very unpleasant experience from all I have heard, what with the crouching, crawling, and being rained on at least while getting the fly up. I handle it completely differently, because I have a free standing tent. On arrival at a site the very ...


13

Some general rules: layer system also for the hands is a good idea but those gardening gloves won't work pretty well better use inner liner gloves (wool or even a softshell glove) and a warm mitten as the outer layer to avoid cooling off use hats (again use a layer-system) including a warm winter hat which covers the ears (also see this about heat loss ...


12

The general guideline for tornado safety is to get as low to the ground as possible and assume the tornado safety crouch: Wind speeds will be slower close to the ground, you are less likely to be hit by a flying object, and are less of a target for lightning strikes. In the same vein, it is best to avoid stands of trees if possible because the risk of ...


12

If the poles of your tent attach to the outer you're in luck. Before you go remove the inner from the outer and pack these separately, potentially wrap them in plastic bags or something so they stay dry. Then when you turn up your first task is to get the waterproof outer up as fast as possible. If it rains while you're putting this up, it's fine. Just ...


9

The outside of a tent is designed to get wet, the key trick is to keep everything else dry. You will want to pitch the outer first and only then add the inner. The other answer has covered that well. Some more general tips though is to have a look at the base of your inner tent and see how waterproof it is. A lot of ground sheets are not waterproof at all. ...


8

Assuming you don't have an outer first tent pitching in the rain comes down to planning and practice. It is actually possible to stay fairly dry if you're organised. There is no sure fire method but there are a few tricks which can help you keep the inner dry. Don't wrap the tent poles up inside the tent, this will force you to unwrap the tent while it's ...


7

Generally, the more times the poles cross each other, the better the wind resistance. Additionally, tents with crossed-pole designs usually have better head room. Of course, more poles means more weight and more time required to pitch and strike the tent. How you pitch the tent is also important. Keep the doors away from the wind, put the bottom of the tent ...


6

If the suggestions in Everything's answer don't work, try these heating options: Heated gloves (I have linked to an example) Hand warmer packs to tuck into your gloves My wife has Reynaud's which leads to poor circulation in fingers and toes, so needs to use these solutions on occasion, and they are very effective.


5

Firstly, if possible, wait a while. Find somewhere to shelter out of the rain, and wait to see if the rain stops. For typical UK summer weather, most heavy rain is only short showers. So it will probably stop raining (or at least ease off) in 10 minutes or so. If its not going to stop raining, you can unpack your tent while under shelter. Then sort out ...


5

In addition to the other answers, if you expect heavy rain (I'm also heading for Snowdonia this weekend...) be careful about the location you choose as well. Avoid places near rivers or streams but also avoid hollows in the ground or the bottom of slopes. Your groundsheet may be waterproof but its sides only extend upwards for a certain length and it is ...


5

A forecast should be posted daily at all ranger stations and visitor centers in the park. This will be the most reliable (i.e. not dependent on technology) way to get an up-to-date forecast. On the National Weather Service website, it says the following: The National Weather Service does not provide direct email/SMS alerts to the general public. ...


4

One last tip, if you don't get everything just right, carry a pack towel or other microfibre super absorbent towel to get the inside as dry as possible before putting gear inside.


4

I have friends who swear by silk inners. They are thin, so can be worn under other gloves, but are extremely warm for the thickness. Combine these with windstopper outers - as mentioned elsewhere, layering is good practice. On the downside, silk is really expensive, at least where I live. On the upside, silk lasts a long time and doesn't get smelly.


3

A first consideration in considering wind-resistance should be your choice of stakes and how you use them; an improperly staked tent is largely equivalent to an oversized kite. (Of course there is no rule saying you must use the stakes that come with a tent.) In terms of tent design, there are some factors that can only be evaluated though detailed photos ...


3

First thing you should do is confirm the validity of the news. Assuming that the news is genuine: Report your location to some one sitting out safe who can coordinate a rescue once it is all sorted out. If you are car-camping, take a measure if you can drive away before it hits. If you don't think you can, get away from Cars as soon as you can. If you ...


2

As EverythingRightPlace writes, you should focus on all your body parts. To survive the Polar Vortex you need: Winter boots. These should comprise of an outer boot and a removable inner boot. The inner boot should be well insulated from the outer boot. Trousers. You should wear long underpants, down-filled trousers and a wind stopper over that. Down ...


2

Update after coming back from Yellowstone: I was originally looking for a way to get frequent weather forecast by text message. As @studiohack pointed out in the comments, cell phone coverage is very spotty in Yellowstone. I have never managed to catch an AT&T signal. Don't count on being able to use a cell phone. That said, Weather Underground can ...


2

I'd love to write a nice long post regarding this once I have time. Short answer: height/profile: the lower the profile, the better off you are. anchoring: tent pegs, guy-lines, these are both important, you can't peg a tent on a mountain made of granite, that's where guy-lines really help. shelter: you can use surrounding geography (e.g. a large ...


1

I've been with the Boy Scouts for many years and one thing that we always did when backpacking in remote areas was to not get too cozy. By that I mean don't unpack everything. We always kept as much of our gear as possible in our backpacks so if we needed to leave in a hurry, like if a tornado is coming, all we had to do was break down our tents and sleeping ...


1

Back in the day, they told us to run to a nearby ditch and duck and cover (on the news during tornado warnings and watches). I was in a trailer, with no cellar/basement nearby. Instead of blindly offering that as advice, I thought I'd do a quick google check. My search turned up this nifty article on pros and cons of ditch vs car. Excerpt: Hazards of ...


1

The tent and the canoe are both objects that can catch wind. Tornadoes can generate winds in excess of 200 MPH and can throw cars. You would want to avoid being in either. Securing as much gear as possible is good common sense, but think about your safety and the safety of your party first.


1

Trying to find a tent like this, I thought of searching in reviews, blogs and shops in countries or areas that are very windy. Youtube and amateur reviewers always help. For example when I got my Terra Nova 1-person tent I looked for reviews all over but it was not until I saw a review from a Scottish guy camping in the highlands that I was convinced. ...


1

Anon is correct. Nor'easter is a storm system blowing high winds and Artic air coming from the north or north east. A Sou'wester originates in the tropical/subtropical Atlantic and brings warm air and heavy precipitation. Newscasters tend to call these northeasters thinking, I guess, that it's a storm on the northeastern United States and therefore a ...



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