Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

9

No question about it -- use a life vest. Make sure you're using a secure, tight-fitting jacket, though. The ones I've always used have several straps across the front so you can get a good, snug fit. If the jacket isn't fitted properly, you stand a good chance of the jacket popping up around your face when you go in the drink. A tight-fitting jacket also ...


6

My gut reaction is this - it's a can full of human waste, it's going to smell whatever you do with it. However, I wonder whether you might be going down the wrong kind of route with things such as bleach etc. - such chemicals may do more harm than good if they kill the micro-organisms that break down the waste. It may sound silly, I would try something like ...


5

USGS: http://waterwatch.usgs.gov/index.php?r=us&id=ww_current National Weather Service Map: http://water.weather.gov/ahps2/index.php?wfo=ffc This is an easy to read table for GA, but I can't figure out how to navigate to other states on their site: http://www.srh.noaa.gov/ffc/html/rva.php More NOAA for the Colorado Basin: http://www.cbrfc.noaa.gov/ ...


5

Reliance makes Double Doodie Toilet Waste Bags with Bio-Gel. Each bag has an inner waste bag and also an outer sealable, leakproof bag. The Bio-Gel inside the bag reduces odors and solidifies the waste into a gel. Works well with most portable toilets.


5

The instructions I've always heard are unequivocal - always wear a life vest. By all means make sure it fits well and lose straps are tucked away to minimise entanglement, but, when in a sport where there is real risk of falling in water and being knocked unconscious definitely wear a life vest.


4

Class 1: Very small rough areas, requires no maneuvering. (Skill Level: None) Class 2: Some rough water, maybe some rocks, small drops, might require maneuvering. (Skill Level: Basic Paddling Skill) Class 3: Whitewater, medium waves, maybe a 3–5 ft drop, but not much considerable danger. May require significant maneuvering. (Skill Level: Experienced ...


3

Generally if someone asks this question they don't have a lot of experience and are going with a guide so I will approach it from that point of view. The first thing to do is bring your feet up to the top of the water and get to the raft as fast as you can. You want to keep your feet up to help against hitting any debris you may be floating over and or ...


3

Yes. Class IV would be unsafe for the group as a whole, if it occurs in the first couple of days of the trip. If you have 1 or 2 experienced people in the paddle raft and you keep one at the back to set the pace and call commands you should be fine in class III, with a good riverside training the morning you leave. I frequently do 4 days on the upper salt ...


3

A version of crawl is your best bet - a bit like that used by triathlon swimmers when they come to close quarters swimming - but with breast stroke or sidestroke legs. Don't have the head in as you would for proper crawl stroke, but keep your face up. Use a low crawl arm stroke and a breast stroke or side stroke kick. This way you get the power of the crawl ...


1

I'd start with class II or III. In addition to the good points MaskedPlant laid out, also be aware of the length of the rapids. A long class II can be every bit as exciting as a short class III, and can also provide a more safe opportunity for the inexperienced paddlers to gain some confidence. Another important tip: be sure to assess attitude of everybody ...


1

Perhaps the sidestroke would work, as it conserves energy but uses a powerful scissor kick.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible