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10

It depends largely on the hammock size and personal preference. My friend's hammock has mesh gear pockets on the underside for storage, but he doesn't mind sleeping with the boots on or inside the hammock. The backpack can pose a bigger issue, because there usually isn't enough room with it filled up. If you empty it out and it compresses easily, give ...


4

Throughout the entire US the law boils down to this: Whether government or citizen owned, you cannot travel on land without the landowners permission. Doing can result in charges from criminal trespass to much, much worse (in the case of some private government lands). So you'll need permission. In short, for each part of your journey. Find who owns ...


4

There is no universal answer. Each property is managed separately, so the only real answer is you have to ask the management of each property that you intend to camp in. By separate property, I mean individual National Forests, for example, not the whole National Forest system. Within any one forest, there will likely be restrictions by location, time of ...


4

How about if you hang the hammock so that there is 3' of space below it, then run a "clothesline" below it? then hang the boots and pack of the line. As long as they are below the hammock they shouldn't get wet. And I'd think it's fine to have the outside touching the ground.


3

Having been in the same situation and tried various scenarios, I've found the best way for hanging my boots is to keep a carabiner with me. I hook it on the loops on the back of my boots and hang that from the straps that I'm using to suspend my hammock. Depending on the weather I also do the same thing with my pack. The straps I use have loops in them. If ...


3

As to answer what areas may be more likely to allow backcountry camping, I usually look at the two following things. If you are unsure where to start, I would consider any long trails in the vicinity of where you want to backpack. Popular long trails, such as the AT, PCT & etc. allow you to camp mostly anywhere around the trail. There are some ...


3

Five hours from San Francisco is enough to reach a good chunk of the Sierras and even further north in the area of Lassen and Shasta. There are large areas of national forest within this range. Generally the national forests will have less restrictions than national parks, particularly popular ones like Yosemite. Each national forest will have its own ...


3

A fairly traditional and challenging route might start on the west coast at Inverie (shop, bunkhouse, remote pub!), which you must reach by sea on a passenger ferry from Mallaig. Head into Knoydart, tackling Munros Meall Buidhe, Sgurr na Ciche (bothy at Sourlies), the head over the Glen Dessary Munros and Sgurr Mor (bothy at Kinbreak), then on to Tomdoun ...



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