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14

If the wind is blowing from all directions, then you need to get as low as possible to the ground. Do your best to find a spot that is somewhat sheltered from the wind. The lee of a crest usually works, but if you have wind blowing from all directions then try to find a recess in the ground - a low spot where the ground that slopes up in all directions away ...


11

There are differing schools of thought on this: Rolling/folding is a lot easier to manage in my opinion, easier to keep track of all the pieces, and when camping in dirty/snowy/wet environments makes it easier to keep the ground side of the tent together and the clean(ish) parts away from it. Stuffing results in fewer creases in the fabric over extended ...


10

What kind of shelter you can build will depend on what is around you at the time. If you are in a forest or woodland you will obviously have more to utilise than in a desert or moorland, but from my own experiences I've built shelters in British deciduous and coniferous woodlands. During Girl Guides (bit like Scouts) and school based Team Building weeks we ...


8

You're going to have to take a chance. The west coast of Scotland (where Skye is) is the wettest part of the UK. If you're up there for 5 days, it might rain everyday regardless of time of year. That said, statistically, the driest time of the year is between March and May. This also has the advantage of being out of midgy season. I don't believe that Skye ...


8

There is the same discussion with paragliders getting porose due to packing methods. And there has been a lot of literature to that topic (a paraglider costs 3.000 USD after all), with a simple conclusion: As nhinkle mentioned, the different methods result in different stress to the fabric. Usually your tent will get damaged due to constant stress on the ...


7

I see 0 benefit to a tarp over a tent with regards to travel in bear country. this would allow the bear to see you (and leaving accordingly) Bears are going to smell you and your camp long before they see you. If your tarp/tent setup is any good at all, it'll be covering you from most directions anyhow. I can't imagine an open tarp having any ...


7

At least 60m away, and 5m high. I doubt that there is such a thing a bag that bears absolutely can't smell through. Bears and other animals with rhinariums (wet nose) not only smell better than humans, they smell in a different way, they can literally taste odours. A bears sense of smell is roughly 2100 times more sensitive than a humans. Even if you got a ...


7

wild camping in the UK is a gray area. Technically it is illegal to wild camp anywhere (Scotland and Dartmoor are the exceptions it is actually legal to wild camp in any unenclosed area there). Practically though, wild camping is tolerated in most wild areas (unenclosed remote areas like the breacon's). You need to be careful though and obey some simple ...


7

I'm a lurker on two knife-related forums (Bladeforums.com and Knifeforums.com). On both of them, "what knife should I buy" or "what is the best knife for X" are either closed quickly or become very hot topics because there is no right answer, only lots and lots and lots of opinions. See this thread for a recent discussion of the topic (including some nice ...


6

Hammock Can you lie flat in it? How large/heavy is it? Footbox? Color (stealth camping?) Suspension How easy is it to adjust? Can you adjust your hammock to different sags? Do you always want to have the same amount of sag? What is the furthest distance between trees that your suspension can accommodate? This will depend on How much stretch ...


5

While the answers above mainly focus on getting a Easy-To-Carry (new) instrument, I'll stick to an attempt of answering how can one carry a standard guitar like the one I have (a Pluto, acoustic). EDIT: As the question was having an edit about travelling guitars, I am afraid I have no experience with them, but I'd rather think that same packing technique ...


5

You can improvise a tent-like shelter with a sturdy rain poncho and some cord. Tie one corner to a tree a 18" (~1/2 meter) off the ground, then spread the poncho in a diamond shape. Pull the corner opposite the tree somewhat taut and tie it to a peg or stick. Spread the other two corners and secure them likewise. For the hood, tie it off so rain can't ...


4

I am Czech ! the blanket rolls were used as standard issue bedrolls in the Army, in barracks they were used as well on the cots, instead of the made bed blankets and sheets issued because as anyone knows who has been in the army, making your bed in the morning and then suffering barracks inspection with roll call is a real pain in the butt !, it saved us ...


4

I've been hammock camping for about four years, and there are a few issues you should be aware of. First, as already noted in the comments under your original question, insulation is critically important. I know that below about 65 F (18 C), I sleep uncomfortably cold. This is because your insulation (sleeping bag) beneath you is compressed by your body ...


3

There are really only two main considerations for hammock camping: the first is hanging the hammock (trees); the second is whether or not it will be warm enough to sleep in a hammock (temperature). Hammocks are great at keeping you cool, so they are best suited for sleeping in hot humid environments where there are plenty of trees to hang it from, and ...


3

A multi-tool or a knife? A multi-tool can be a very appropriate tool for backpacking. It combines the function of many of the tools you mentioned. You may carry the tools you mention above, though. (Note: I've NEVER needed a bottle opener...) If you mean a knife, read on... I do a lot of backpacking in the Eastern US, so I am going to assume that this ...


3

I bring a very small pocket knife with me when I'm backpacking (or whatever they call the activity in Europe...?) As you say, it's convenient because it combines several tools in one. You don't really need three big, heavy pieces of silverware. What works for me is a spoon as my main thing to cook and eat with, plus the pocket knife for tasks like cutting ...


3

There are several aspects to take under consideration: Group holes are not a good practice because your deposits can't be buried too deep. The soil needs enough organic material to eliminate your deposits. But, if the upper layers of the soil are big enough, you could make your hole bigger (so making it appropriate for larger groups). The type of group who ...


3

My solution to this is a Hohner G3T and a 1 Watt Marshall amp. The Hohner fits easily down the side of my bigger rucksacks, and the amp is tiny. They don't add a huge amount to the weight of my pack If the weather is wet I'll wrap them both in a plastic bag, but they have entertained me on many Munro tops. I have never had any wildlife attracted to the ...


3

First of all, in the Netherlands camping in the wild is prohibited, and they really don't like it. Now you're in need for some water, first the good news, tapwater in the netherlands is filtered and ready to drink but like you said, you won't find much public water because of the expenses that are needed to get the water to a fountain (you have no ...


3

I carry two knives when i'm backpacking: a small Swiss army knife (the "Classic" model) and a large hunting knife (I can't remember the brand, it is a good quality one, cost about $150). The Swiss army knife is lightweight and indispensable for its use as a can opener, for gutting fish, and general purpose tools. The authentic Swiss army knives are also ...


2

If the ground is firm or frozen rather than rocky I strongly recommend a quality Y shaped peg such as the Groundhog. When made with good materials this shape is so strong it can easily withstand repeated pounding with heavy stones, and I've never found ground so hard that I can't set up a secure pitch. The Groundhogs will even smash through small buried ...


2

I bike to work here in Japan and sometimes I have to bike back late in the evening (coz of overtime). I live in a mountainous forrested area and there are many boar around (because there's few hunters here). In the past 5 years, boar have crossed my path about 6-7 times (always when it's dark) and they ran at really high speed (there is no way to even ...


2

This depends a lot on what you plan to do, and I don't think there's any such thing as an all-purpose knife. I mostly use mine when hiking and backpacking, when it would be silly to bring a big, heavy knife that I don't need. For what I do, what works great is a tiny swiss army knife, which I mainly use for slicing food (knife blade), cutting moleskin ...


2

I have found that digging a deep group latrine works far better when taking youth and other folks who are hesitant about the whole "pooping in the woods" idea. I make it one of the task as we set up camp, one group cooks, one group sets up tents, one group get water then digs the latrine. I oversee that the hole is deep enough to accommodate the group for ...


2

I've wild-camped a few times in NL without problems. I guess it all depends on how well you hide and where you are. Can't really help for rural area's. But in less rural areas: Laundry: I'd expect laundry facilities for a few euro's in the poorer neighborhood of cities. Where students or immigrants live. Water/shower: some truck stops/gasoline stations ...


2

I've been through a couple of mammalian surveys in the south Indian forests known for elephants. Here are my few suggestions (Disclaimer: These were told to me by forest officials. I cannot vouch for the validity of these). Avoid anything that has a strong odor. (Deos, soaps et al). Avoid bright coloured clothes. (It was told to me that bright coloured ...


2

Strictly, speaking you it is illegal to camp without the landowners permission. If you really want to be legal the best way is to ask a farmer if you can stay in a field. In reality, as long as you are sensible and don't camp right by a road or main path no one is likely to complain. As for where a Google search for wild camping in the brecon beacons ...


2

It is best to put everything away in the same order. the chance of the folds being along the same lines is very low. I find with modern tents the groundsheet wears out, (the very thin layer of waterproof that is on the woven nylon). I count the pegs and put them in the peg bag, the pole in the pole bag. The peg bag in the pole bag. Then fold the tent flat so ...


2

I carry a Victorinox knife. On my last few trips I've used the various tools on it to pry shellfish off rocks, slice cheese and salami, prepare vegetables, cut sticking plaster, cut duct tape for gear repair, cut cloth to make a dressing, open packets of dehydrated food neatly. I have, in the past, used the wood saw on it to clear windfall. It did the job ...



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