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6

These are common in Australia, where snakes (9 out of the 10 most poisonous in the world) and spiders (another insane number of highly poisonous variety) along with other wild life (Crocodiles?, Bullsharks :) ) make tenting on the ground something for the more adventurous or short term residents of the world. They also have the advantage over RV's in that ...


3

The obvious disadvantages for these types of tents are that they occupy valuable roof space making mounting racks (e.g., bike, kayak, or gear) more difficult and that you must pack up your tent every time you want to drive someplace. As for advantages, they allow for a smaller footprint then having a car and a separate tent and can be pitched on uneven, ...


1

Fascinating This is NOT an answer, but just a perspective from another place: I am in western Canada, in the province of Alberta. I would not presume to cross fenced land without asking. But unfenced land is considered open. Much of the land near streams is crown land -- and that is open for reasonable use either walking or camping. Many provincial ...


1

You won't find enough continuous forest for what you want in southern England. But (about 20 years ago) I walked and wild camped (actually bright orange bivvy bags) a fair stretch of the south downs way. It was late December but colder than the weather we've been having recently. I got there by regional train from London. I've also wild camped in the ...


0

re Epping Forest: Epping Forest is quite thin... plus it's near enough urban areas (Essex, eek!) that I'd be slightly concerned about being beaten up by urban Yoof, and/or laughed at, as I approached my chosen place. Bear in mind too that in South-East England at the moment there are in fact some illegal immigrants who live out in the wild... probably ...


8

Population density Germany: 228 pop/km2; US: 33. Much of the land is simply privately owned. Most surface area (public or private) is used one way or another (residential, forestry, agriculture): There is no "wild" or "great outdoors" in Germany with the exception of a few National Parks (Alps, Oder, Bavarian Forest, among others) which are regulated just ...


3

It might be a translation issue: Camping means 'zelten' in German, 'Zelt' means tent. "Zelten verboten!" means no camping, even without a tent.


12

In Central Europe there is a much higher population density as e.g. in many parts of the USA, Canada or Scandinavia. There is almost no valley without a village. So private property is rather rare and the land owner want to protect it. In Austria there had even been a law from 1852 (Reichsforstgesetz), which prohibited entering the forest completely. Not ...


36

The tent just makes your intent obvious: You planned to sleep there from the beginning. And this is what the authorities want to prevent: Camping in the wild. On the other hand many legislations allow for emergency and high altitude bivouacs, which are inevitable. So the gray area developed where people sleep without a tent in order to escape punishment, as ...


18

It's not really about the tent, it is about planned "bivouacs" (that means you plan to sleep outdoors) and emergency bivouacs where the latter of course aren't forbidden. That means if you carry a tent and sleep in it, it was obviously planned to sleep outdoors where people possibly do harm to the nature because they generally don't follow the Leave No ...


2

If you really want to camp I would recommend the New Forest as there are lots of campsites there and plenty of walking for at least a weekend. The problem is most of Southern England is pretty much all residential or farmland so there are few good places where you can wild camp reliably. There are probably also plenty of camping locations along the North ...


6

It is illegal to wild camp in England outside of Dartmoor. A lot of our woodlands are privately owned. It maybe relaxed in places, as in, people get away with it, but you might find that harder down near London. You may need permission to wild camp some areas. However... for forests near London to visit you could have a look at Epping Forest, it sits ...


1

Yes, it is forbidden make a fire, build a tent or sleep outsite also in the national park Bohemian Switzerland. Offical website: www.npcs.cz


11

Yes, there are special places where you are allowed to sleep outside if you are climbing there. And by "outside" I mean without a tent, because these locations are (more or less) weatherproof by having roofs of rock. They usually have a a lot of sand on the ground which makes them quite comfortable. The local term of such a place is "boofe". They are a bit ...


8

According to German law, bivouacking (defined as sleeping outside for one night without a tent) is generally allowed in Germany, but only outside from nature protection areas. Camping is generally forbidden outside of designated campsites. As you mention, large parts of the Elbe Sandstone Mountains are under statutory protection within Saxon Switzerland ...


3

Skirt. If you care a lot about wind and sand, then you should look for a tent with a skirt - many moutaneering-specific tents do have one. But skirt does increase the weight, so there's no right decision. I'd suppose a tent, that has a very small gap between a... uh, upper part, and a ground. Then you can just put some snow or sand there, to close the gap ...


2

Personally, I think that most decent backpacking tents will be fine for Iceland. The temperature is not extremely cold and you should be fine as long as you have a semi-decent sleeping bag. One thing I would recommend is getting a tent that can be self supporting (i.e. doesn't need pegging out to stand up) this can be very useful if you have to camp on ...



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