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Since wide open plains is one of your objectives, I'd stick to the relatively drier areas east and north of the northern end of the Sacramento Valley. The coastal range is quite wet in comparison, so you won't find open valleys with no trees. You might enjoy exploring by starting in Westwood and heading north thru the Lassen NF. You will go thru small ...


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This is a broad question, so here's a broad answer: The coastal ranges north of SF are heavily forested and have narrow steep valleys.... and hillbillies and marijuana farms. Although as you go inland there is more grass and some of the valleys are very nice when the grass is green and flowers come out. North & east of the Sacramento Valley you have a ...


2

The answer to your question is: the middle of the Selway-Bitteroot/River-of-No-Return Wildnerness in Idaho. These are actually two wilderness areas joined together (separated by a single dirt road) which together form the largest roadless area and the largest wildnerness in the Continental US. The Selway Bitterroot is where the author of "A River Runs ...


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Project Remote was started by a scientifically-minded couple to quantitatively determine the most remote locations in each of the 50 states mainly using the distance to the nearest road or town and whether cel phone coverage is available. They've cataloged quite a few states already east of the Mississippi, which you can check out here: Project Remote. The ...


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Most of the "untouched" places left in North America are that way for a reason, no one wants to touch them. There are loads of barren desserts in Nevada, Utah, New Mexico and Arizona that people don't bother going to because it's dead, there's nothing there but heat sand and rocks. The easiest way to figure out what parts of the USA are isolated from ...


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a fence for horses or cows, Take a grass straw, wet it a little bit, hold it against the fence, if it ticks in your fingers it means the power is on. i always do that do double check before put my hands on the fence, if im fixing it and say someone else turned it off.


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Growing up in rural New Zealand, we often encountered electric fences. Some of them were illegally high-powered to deal with big animals. We tested fences either with the back of our hands or with a piece of grass. As specified a few times in this question (thanks @Michael Martinez), using the back of the hand is for safety. An electric shock can cause ...


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TL;DR - First try to identify if the wire is supposed to carry electricity (insulators on posts/wire goes to an electrical box/posted warning signs/ect...). There's really not much you can do to check the wire for current without a device aside from listening to it, touching it (potentially dangerous), or throwing something onto it that might react to a ...


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I understand your question such that you are asking about fences for livestock and alike, not high-security fences. It is your responsibility to check if you could get in danger. If the fence looks like it was made to withstand humans and/or aggressive animals, I suggest not to touch it with anything. Apart from that (I have actually never seen a fence like ...


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I have never heard of someone legally setting up a fence with a strong potential good enough to be fatal. That said, it is very much a possibility that the fence might severely injure (or worst case kill) a dog or some small animal (Pets when hiking?). In such a case, one indeed needs to be worried about an electric fence. First things first. If responsible ...



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