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24

I actually had a site bookmarked for this very reason that provided some good, sound advice. I've always heard that a cougar (mountain lion) generally doesn't let you see it unless its considering attacking. 100 yards away or more that is unattentive to you Avoid rapid movements, running, loud, excited talk. Stay in groups; keep children with adults. ...


17

In the UK we have, comparative to other countries, very few venomous creatures. However the false widow and adders are still a risk. False widows have mostly been recorded in the South of England and Wales (though I've personally never seen one) but have been recorded to have bitten and hospitalise people, whilst this maybe when out and about it has also ...


16

In addition to the wildlife hazards mentioned in the other answers, swans and geese can be intimidating even if not highly hazardous - the adage about a swan's wing being able to break your arm is said to be just about true, but unlikely - and walkers occasionally report hostility or aggression from landowners who dispute their right to use a particular ...


10

American black bears They are somewhat common in some wilderness areas of California, mostly in the mountains. In their natural state, black bears are thinly populated on the landscape because it takes a large area to support one, and they are also shy of humans. Black bears are not very large; females can be the size of a large dog. There are certain ...


10

First of all, you are more likely to hear the rattlesnake than see it. They tend to camouflage themselves quite well, and unless you are paying very close attention, they are easy to miss. I have actually stepped less than a foot from one and not noticed it until I was passing it (It was coiled in a circle, hence my lack of rattle snake bites...) If you ...


9

A fuller history: They were approved for a few years (2004-2007) for use in Yosemite, which is a proving ground for bear-resistant containers. In 2007 I believe there were a couple incidents where bears were able to puncture an Ursack and "suck" food out of it. This led Yosemite to ban them from the park (and ultimately some other national parks followed ...


8

Are you sure this is a good idea at all? If you need an electric fence to keep animals from your camp, then (in my opinion!) you must have done something wrong. As for wolves, did you ever hear of a single case where wolves would attack a camp site? Bears are a different beast, but again: I suggest doing everything to prevent the situation, not to solve it ...


8

I think these signs in California and elsewhere describe it quite simply:


8

In general the british isles are very safe. Most paths are well marked, dangerous areas are also marked off, and there are no large predators or other animals that are a serious threat to humans. Wildlife The other answer already covered this well. Essentially there are no animals in the British isles that are deliberately dangerous to you, although there ...


7

Could be two I'd guess: Labyrinth spider It's hard to completly identify but by the sound of the web shape and your description it is most likely a Labyrinth spider More info here At this time of the year, the funnel webs in our gardens are normally the work of Labyrinth spiders. Labyrinths are common, shy little critters, and being a dull ...


7

To get an official answer to this question, I decided to email the National Park Service at Yosemite NP. The park ranger said: Bears are attracted to "food" odors. When talking about food storage, anything that has an odor regardless of packaging is considered "food." For this reason, cigarettes and other tobacco products are considered food. ...


7

There are several concerns Rodents. Unlike the eastern US, rodents in the West are much more likely to carry Hanta virus and Bubonic plague. These are not common, but unlike the Eastern US, they are also not unheard of. Scorpions. Scorpions in the east are a minor annoyance. Some of the Western ones kill. Wild Horses. Again, unheard of in the east, ...


6

You propose packing food deeply in your backpack. I'd specifically recommend against that. Bears (and other wild animals) have vastly more acute senses of smell than humans, and they won't hesitate to chew through your pack to get at anything buried there. Even if there aren't bears in an area, there are likely to be some kind of varmints (squirrels, ...


6

Actually, electric fences with an attached alarm are pretty common when camping in Svalbard (lots and lots of polar bears). Yet, this unfortunately has the sole purpose of buying you some extra time to get your rifle and can only be considered the last of last resorts. Additionally the failure rate seems to be rather high. In any case I don't think you'll ...


6

Not sure how hazardous they are, but wasps, bees, hornets etc could spoil your trip in sufficient numbers or if you have an allergy to them. The NHS has a good page on biting/stinging insects, how to avoid them and what to do if you don't: 12 UK insects and bugs that bite or sting


6

After spending quite some time researching what you can do to avoid tiger encounters, the best advise I can give you is–don't put yourself in a position where you might encounter a tiger. Tigers are man-eaters, estimates put fatalities due to tiger attacks at about 373,000 since 1800. The only truly effective safety measure is a big gun. Measures to ...


5

I use to pitch my ten in such a way that I can use the surrounding vegetation as anchors, or build small metal screens to put around the ground spike and line.


5

In the test report of 2004 according to Ursack: Bears carried inadequately-secured Ursacks short distances suggesting that users should be able to locate most bags that might get carried off by bears. Distances carried during the four tests were 0.3m, 1.6 m, 5.8 m, and somewhere between 41 and 67 m. In those cases, the sack did prevent the bear from ...


5

I have come across wild boars about a dozen times (I admit, not that much), in numbers from a single male, mothers with young upto groups of 30-40 and I've never felt threatened. Sometimes the leading (fe)male might approach you aggressively just long enough for the rest of the group to run away and then retreat too. I usually stay silent and try to observe ...


5

It's always best to back off and walk around it. Rattlesnakes can strike very fast and far. I find that the bigger problem with snakes in common is that you step close to one unexpectedly. Most of the time they strike out of reflex when you almost stand on them, like for instance in bushes or below large stones where you step over.


5

The part of the answer may sound very specific to India, and at some part indeed I would try and be more generic. (Specific to India) When you say feline, and specifically in India, you are more likely to encounter a Leopard than a Tiger, even if its a Tiger reserve. If I can relate some data and my experiences about trekking in Tiger Reserves (Rather, to ...


4

The other answers have great information. I would add some specifics that I have learned from living and backpacking all over Arizona and the white mountains for most of my life. Don't have everyone pee on the same rock/place at night. It will dry out and the salt can attract deer. If they get brought in to camp for the salt, they might smell something else ...


4

I've taken the liberty to bold 2 questions I believed where the main questions of your post. Are there animals that are simply not afraid of much bigger humans? Yes. A variety of animals have adapted to our societies/cities and have adapted, other species may have no other choice than to look for food near or in our ever expanding cities and towns. May it ...


4

I know nothing about wombats, but I do stalk a particular wild animal here in my part of the world. Here is some general advice. Scat is a good start. Are there areas where it is more concentrated? Get well away from human activity. Wild animals avoid us, some more so than others. I gather that wombats are on the shy side. When you get out there, be ...


3

Different parts of California have different wildlife, so you should probably narrow the region. Anyway, I'll talk about the areas I'm familiar with. In the Santa Cruz mountains, there are a lot of pumas (mountain lions.) Encounters are very rare. The advice is that if you do encounter one, make yourself appear large and noisy by waving your hands and your ...


3

Bears are not naturally attracted to smoke - except for Smoky the Bear. Same goes for mountain lions, wolves, etc - they will generally avoid smoke (actually, all mammals will) for obvious reasons. I suppose there is always some incredibly unlikely scenario where a bear (or other animal) has become habituated to smoke and associates it with food, somehow, ...


3

The best recommendation is to take all necessary precautions for yourself, wildlife and the fauna. What measures make sense depends on the area you are visiting. For example, in more remote parts of the east coast (Maine, New-Brunswick, etc.) you will only find black bears and they tend to be pretty shy. In these areas, many people rely on hanging their ...


3

"Unlikely" is not the same as "won't happen." You're going to the White Mountains in California, so call the ranger station in Bishop and ask them. They will probably tell you that bears do exist there, so the probability is not zero. "It seems quite difficult to me to keep food at least 15 feet above the ground and 10 feet horizontally from a tree trunk. ...


3

This video is quite a good instruction. :-) This article is quite interesting, though not really useful. Read the discussion though. But beware! This strategy might not be valid for other beasts of prey, such as lions. In this video, the man instructs to be quiet and stay low not to agitate the beast. Also, man in this video is staying low (in fact, he's ...


3

I live in the northeast US, but have done a bunch of hiking in the desert of AZ and NM. Big animals aren't really the problem. Most everything like that will run away from you. Camping with bears around is something you have to think about, but that is not really different from New England. In fact, you're quite unlikely to bump into a bear in the ...



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