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72

Wild dogs can indeed be dangerous, and packs can be extremely dangerous. You do not want to take on a pack of dogs if you can at all avoid it, and running is often a particularly bad idea. I suggest starting with the basics: try to keep the dog calm and don't try to intimidate it. This means: Don't make direct eye contact, and remember that sunglasses ...


29

I actually had a site bookmarked for this very reason that provided some good, sound advice. I've always heard that a cougar (mountain lion) generally doesn't let you see it unless its considering attacking. 100 yards away or more that is unattentive to you Avoid rapid movements, running, loud, excited talk. Stay in groups; keep children with adults. ...


25

I'd say the only circumstances where you could try to run is when a safe place is near (your car, some kind of shelter, a tree you can climb etc.), the dogs are already alert and running to you (otherwise you could just walk to the shelter without them noticing), and you can realistically make it to the shelter before the dogs do. Remember that dogs car run ...


25

To the question of whether you should run from a pack of dogs that may be aggressive, the answer is an unqualified NO!. As to what you should do, the answer is a bit more complicated. In the vast majority of cases, dogs won't attack you without provocation. As always, assume the best but prepare for the worst. The basics: Be Prepared: Prevention is ...


23

In the UK we have, comparative to other countries, very few venomous creatures. However the false widow and adders are still a risk. False widows have mostly been recorded in the South of England and Wales (though I've personally never seen one) but have been recorded to have bitten and hospitalise people, whilst this maybe when out and about it has also ...


23

So far all of the answers are assuming the wild dogs are actively hunting you or at least seriously considering attacking you. This might be due to the part of your question where you say: ... or should I stand fast and defend myself? If the dogs appear to be actively hunting you then a controlled exit to a safe area as suggested by Dmitry Grigoryev is ...


21

In general they are not considered dangerous because they rarely attack humans. You should not run away from coyotes as they will consider you a prey if you do. Under extreme circumstances they may circle an individual or a group. Making noise generally keeps them at bay or at a distance. In 2009, there was, unfortunately, a fatality in Cape-Breton ...


19

In addition to the wildlife hazards mentioned in the other answers, swans and geese can be intimidating even if not highly hazardous - the adage about a swan's wing being able to break your arm is said to be just about true, but unlikely - and walkers occasionally report hostility or aggression from landowners who dispute their right to use a particular ...


16

In the UK you should probably contact the RSPCA or RSPB. I think RSCPA is probably best as they actually do welfare stuff whereas RSPB is about conservation. They should have the best knowledge of whether the bird needs to be killed and how best to do it. I presume other countries have similar charities. If you need to kill the bird yourself I think the ...


16

unfortunately, you have limited choice. My suggestion is to hold the rabbit body in one hand, and the head in the other, quickly snapping the head up and backwards will break the spinal column and kill the rabbit quickly and painlessly.


16

Unless the animal had entrails spilling out or was dragging its paralyzed hindquarters, probably best to give it the benefit of the doubt. It might recover.


16

The best thing to do is just avoid it completely. If you can't go around because the bush is too thick, find a plenty long enough stick and get it off the path. The snake won't chase you, it's just defending itself. Do NOT pick the snake up with the stick, just get a hook on it as best you can and fling it gently off the path.


16

Compare a human skull to that of a deer. The human skull is dominated by the brain, so a shot to the head is likely to penetrate the cranium and brain. On the other hand, a deer brain is very small compared to the skull and presents a very small target. Furthermore there are bony stuctures which might deflect away a bullet or arrow. See this picture of a ...


15

Already some great answers here. TBH, haven't been able to go through all of them, so adding in a short summary as what I do and ask people to follow. Answer to question 1: Thumb rule: Never ever ever ever try to handle a snake. If you don't know what snake it is, whether venomous or not, or a semi-venomous, refer rule #1. If you don't know a snake well ...


15

The head tends to be a harder target to hit than the vital organs in the center of the body, but a penetrating hit there is more likely to take a human or animal to unconsciousness and inability immediately. That's more important to do to a human who may have a weapon that can hit you back quickly, than it is to a nearly-defenseless animal you are hunting ...


14

It does. Rule of a bear cache is to put EVERYTHING that smells, in your bear cache and hang it. This applies to toothpaste, deodorant, food, lotions, perfumes, yes. More info: What precautions should I take to protect myself and my camp from bears?


14

It's not animals you really need to worry about, it's bugs. I pack a tent to keep out of the bugs more than I do to keep the critters out. The only time I can ever remember having issues with animals was in the Ptolemy Plateau, for some reason there were a lot of gophers, and they were all over our campsite at night, scratching at the walls of out tent and ...


12

First of all, you are more likely to hear the rattlesnake than see it. They tend to camouflage themselves quite well, and unless you are paying very close attention, they are easy to miss. I have actually stepped less than a foot from one and not noticed it until I was passing it (It was coiled in a circle, hence my lack of rattle snake bites...) If you ...


12

According to Backpacker, and the National Park Service, peeing attracts some large predators because animals like the salty taste: ...urinate well away from camp on rock, sandy areas, or duff. Animals are attracted to salts in urine... I would argue, therefore, that urinating around your campsite is not a good idea when near large predatory animals. ...


12

I'm going to give some things to look for, but none of these are definite giveaways. It is very unlikely you will be able to tell a barely used human made trail from a game trail. Hikers like to be very obvious about the trails they make, and established trails are well worn. If a trail is very narrow, has undisturbed or barely disturbed ground cover, and ...


11

A few points to add here: Coyotes are not know to be aggressive towards humans. But always remember that coyote is a wild animal. It is not domesticated and hence it's very difficult say with certainty about the behavior. Coyotes are know to attack dogs, sheep and other livestock. So yes, they can bite. If not you, your dog maybe? Any animal, when it ...


11

I think these signs in California and elsewhere describe it quite simply:


11

American black bears They are somewhat common in some wilderness areas of California, mostly in the mountains. In their natural state, black bears are thinly populated on the landscape because it takes a large area to support one, and they are also shy of humans. Black bears are not very large; females can be the size of a large dog. There are certain ...


11

No! Don't do this with your own hands. You can't kill him instantly without pain and without blood. If you try to break his neck, very surely you won't know the correct moves which is needed for that, and you will cause only terrible pain for him. His neck is much stronger as you would think. The surest way is if you take him to an animal ambulance and let ...


10

In general the british isles are very safe. Most paths are well marked, dangerous areas are also marked off, and there are no large predators or other animals that are a serious threat to humans. Wildlife The other answer already covered this well. Essentially there are no animals in the British isles that are deliberately dangerous to you, although there ...


10

As a rancher, I routinely have to dispatch injured birds. If you don't have a knife handy, there are two ways: Grasp the bird by the head and use a whipping motion to decapitate. The body separates from the head. Toss the head. Another way is to do pretty much the same thing and rapidly rotate the body of the bird, but with less force - this breaks the ...


10

Before we did the following we had barely any birds in the garden... We put up one of those stick in the ground multiple feeders which has three hooks with three different feeders on, a table/bowl and a water bowl . So what you've added to the garden should be plenty. The issue here maybe what food you use - what you feed when is important, however your ...


10

In Mexico, I learned that the best way to deal with wild dogs was to squat down very briefly and pick up a small stone. I never had to actually chuck it at a dog. They skulked off quite quickly when they saw the movement that looked like the human was picking up a small rock.


10

Yes! Not a silly question at all and surprisingly easy to answer: yes! There are even sound-systems exactly for that use. Try sound. Sound can have an excellent impact on a coyote that has wandered into your yard or campsite. Try banging trash can lids or anything else that is noisy to scare the coyote off. Yell and make a lot of noise ...


9

A fuller history: They were approved for a few years (2004-2007) for use in Yosemite, which is a proving ground for bear-resistant containers. In 2007 I believe there were a couple incidents where bears were able to puncture an Ursack and "suck" food out of it. This led Yosemite to ban them from the park (and ultimately some other national parks followed ...



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