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20

In the UK we have, comparative to other countries, very few venomous creatures. However the false widow and adders are still a risk. False widows have mostly been recorded in the South of England and Wales (though I've personally never seen one) but have been recorded to have bitten and hospitalise people, whilst this maybe when out and about it has also ...


17

In addition to the wildlife hazards mentioned in the other answers, swans and geese can be intimidating even if not highly hazardous - the adage about a swan's wing being able to break your arm is said to be just about true, but unlikely - and walkers occasionally report hostility or aggression from landowners who dispute their right to use a particular ...


14

In the UK you should probably contact the RSPCA or RSPB. I think RSCPA is probably best as they actually do welfare stuff whereas RSPB is about conservation. They should have the best knowledge of whether the bird needs to be killed and how best to do it. I presume other countries have similar charities. If you need to kill the bird yourself I think the ...


10

American black bears They are somewhat common in some wilderness areas of California, mostly in the mountains. In their natural state, black bears are thinly populated on the landscape because it takes a large area to support one, and they are also shy of humans. Black bears are not very large; females can be the size of a large dog. There are certain ...


9

In general the british isles are very safe. Most paths are well marked, dangerous areas are also marked off, and there are no large predators or other animals that are a serious threat to humans. Wildlife The other answer already covered this well. Essentially there are no animals in the British isles that are deliberately dangerous to you, although there ...


7

As a rancher, I routinely have to dispatch injured birds. If you don't have a knife handy, there are two ways: Grasp the bird by the head and use a whipping motion to decapitate. The body separates from the head. Toss the head. Another way is to do pretty much the same thing and rapidly rotate the body of the bird, but with less force - this breaks the ...


7

Could be two I'd guess: Labyrinth spider It's hard to completly identify but by the sound of the web shape and your description it is most likely a Labyrinth spider More info here At this time of the year, the funnel webs in our gardens are normally the work of Labyrinth spiders. Labyrinths are common, shy little critters, and being a dull ...


7

After spending quite some time researching what you can do to avoid tiger encounters, the best advise I can give you is–don't put yourself in a position where you might encounter a tiger. Tigers are man-eaters, estimates put fatalities due to tiger attacks at about 373,000 since 1800. The only truly effective safety measure is a big gun. Measures to ...


7

Not sure how hazardous they are, but wasps, bees, hornets etc could spoil your trip in sufficient numbers or if you have an allergy to them. The NHS has a good page on biting/stinging insects, how to avoid them and what to do if you don't: 12 UK insects and bugs that bite or sting


6

The part of the answer may sound very specific to India, and at some part indeed I would try and be more generic. (Specific to India) When you say feline, and specifically in India, you are more likely to encounter a Leopard than a Tiger, even if its a Tiger reserve. If I can relate some data and my experiences about trekking in Tiger Reserves (Rather, to ...


5

I use to pitch my ten in such a way that I can use the surrounding vegetation as anchors, or build small metal screens to put around the ground spike and line.


5

If you're not concerned about bears, I would (ironically) suggest using an Ursack. The Ursack is a kevlar bag that is "bear resistant" but not legally approved for use in many areas which require bear canisters. They weight much less than bear cans, but are very resistant to punctures, so a coyote shouldn't be able to break into one. You may have concerns ...


4

From gov.uk you can hunt the following legally: Birds You don’t need a licence to hunt: game birds, eg pheasants and grouse quarry birds and certain wild birds, eg moorhens and woodcock certain waterfowl, eg some ducks and geese Deer You don’t need a licence to hunt deer in open season. Open season varies by region and species. ...


4

The magic skunk-smell-be-gone recipe: In a plastic bucket, mix well the following ingredients: 1 quart of 3% Hydrogen Peroxide 1/4 cup of baking soda 1 to 2 teaspoons liquid soap First thing you want to do is get as much of the skunk goo off of you as you can. Using paper towel, tissues, or a rag you can throw away, dab the spray off your skin. Rinsing ...


4

I know nothing about wombats, but I do stalk a particular wild animal here in my part of the world. Here is some general advice. Scat is a good start. Are there areas where it is more concentrated? Get well away from human activity. Wild animals avoid us, some more so than others. I gather that wombats are on the shy side. When you get out there, be ...


3

Different parts of California have different wildlife, so you should probably narrow the region. Anyway, I'll talk about the areas I'm familiar with. In the Santa Cruz mountains, there are a lot of pumas (mountain lions.) Encounters are very rare. The advice is that if you do encounter one, make yourself appear large and noisy by waving your hands and your ...


3

A few others I could think of: Foxes Foxes are generally not aggressive are easily scared away by humans. However, there have been cases of fox attacks of on small children. It should be noted these incidents are very rare. Interestingly this appears to be more of an urban problem possibly caused by the close proximity between humans and foxes and the ...


3

If it were a wild bird, I would call the nearest wildlife rehabilitator for instructions. Sometimes a bird can be saved, or at least they will gain information about what is going on with the local populations, which is valuable not just for them, but for others who may use their data. Scientists and government are increasingly finding that wildlife ...


3

In situations like that, I wring the neck. Just grab the bird's head and twist it around and around. The skull will detach from the spinal column and kill the bird quickly. You have to actually kill the animal with your bare hands, but that's better than letting it suffer.


3

Decapitation. Cut the head with a cleaver, machete or axe. It is gruesome, and the body will flap (so I suggest you tie the legs and wings). But the bird will almost instantly die. Check your local laws if the bird is endangered or protected. You do not want to be on the wrong side of the law when trying to be humane.


2

I was told the following by an old chicken-farmer when I was young: 'humane' is our (humans) notion/idea of the least amount of pain/stress/fear (which we believe takes place in the brains). He believed that the brain in decapitated heads (and broken necks) remain operational for about 30 seconds (probably based on well known guillotine stories where the ...


1

If you want to keep the food in the tent you could use an odor resistant bag such as OPSak or NiloBarrier. NyloBarrier is very light and convenient. You could combine this with a Ursack as mentioned by @nhinkle. If you don't want to odor proof the food but would like rodent protection a cuben fiber stuff sack would do just fine.


1

The Parks Canada website has this to say about the region: East Coast Boreal Region Natural Region 21 WILDLIFE: Wildlife characteristic of the boreal forest thrives here: moose, caribou, black bear, red fox, lynx, snowshoe hare, wolf, spruce grouse, raven. Along the coast congregate seabirds and waterfowl: Atlantic puffins, ...



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