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76

Wild dogs can indeed be dangerous, and packs can be extremely dangerous. You do not want to take on a pack of dogs if you can at all avoid it, and running is often a particularly bad idea. I suggest starting with the basics: try to keep the dog calm and don't try to intimidate it. This means: Don't make direct eye contact, and remember that sunglasses ...


30

To the question of whether you should run from a pack of dogs that may be aggressive, the answer is an unqualified NO!. As to what you should do, the answer is a bit more complicated. In the vast majority of cases, dogs won't attack you without provocation. As always, assume the best but prepare for the worst. The basics: Be Prepared: Prevention is ...


26

I'd say the only circumstances where you could try to run is when a safe place is near (your car, some kind of shelter, a tree you can climb etc.), the dogs are already alert and running to you (otherwise you could just walk to the shelter without them noticing), and you can realistically make it to the shelter before the dogs do. Remember that dogs car run ...


24

So far all of the answers are assuming the wild dogs are actively hunting you or at least seriously considering attacking you. This might be due to the part of your question where you say: ... or should I stand fast and defend myself? If the dogs appear to be actively hunting you then a controlled exit to a safe area as suggested by Dmitry Grigoryev is ...


20

"Mynd you, møøse bites Kan be pretti nasti..." Moose attacks are common in North America. This is largely due to population numbers (you'll see more moose than bear) as much as people's lack of understanding of the risk. People will approach them, attempt to pet them, etc. If left alone, moose will ordinarily leave you alone. However, they can be ...


19

You will pick up ticks by spending a lot of time outdoors, but I routinely find them after walking across 10 ft of grass between my car and my front door. No matter how much prevention you practice, keep an eye out for Lyme symptoms, and go to the doctor for antibiotics if they show up. A vaccine would be much nicer. The socks-in-your pants method is very ...


18

unfortunately, you have limited choice. My suggestion is to hold the rabbit body in one hand, and the head in the other, quickly snapping the head up and backwards will break the spinal column and kill the rabbit quickly and painlessly.


17

The best thing to do is just avoid it completely. If you can't go around because the bush is too thick, find a plenty long enough stick and get it off the path. The snake won't chase you, it's just defending itself. Do NOT pick the snake up with the stick, just get a hook on it as best you can and fling it gently off the path.


17

Probably the single most important thing I do is to tuck the bottom of my pants into the socks. Ticks like to crawl upwards. If they drop onto your feet, they will crawls upwards on your leg looking for the first bit of soft skin with blood vessels close to the surface. If they can get inside your pants, they will find such skin eventually. Otherwise, ...


16

Already some great answers here. TBH, haven't been able to go through all of them, so adding in a short summary as what I do and ask people to follow. Answer to question 1: Thumb rule: Never ever ever ever try to handle a snake. If you don't know what snake it is, whether venomous or not, or a semi-venomous, refer rule #1. If you don't know a snake well ...


16

Compare a human skull to that of a deer. The human skull is dominated by the brain, so a shot to the head is likely to penetrate the cranium and brain. On the other hand, a deer brain is very small compared to the skull and presents a very small target. Furthermore there are bony stuctures which might deflect away a bullet or arrow. See this picture of a ...


15

The head tends to be a harder target to hit than the vital organs in the center of the body, but a penetrating hit there is more likely to take a human or animal to unconsciousness and inability immediately. That's more important to do to a human who may have a weapon that can hit you back quickly, than it is to a nearly-defenseless animal you are hunting ...


15

What you witnessed was almost certainly mating. As this article from TheScientist explains, “Explosive breeding” is a common reproductive strategy among frog species. Males congregate near sources of fresh water and scramble frantically for any females passing by. Only about 5 to 10 percent of males will mate successfully, estimates conservation ...


14

How to tell if an opossum is truly dead? The only safe thing you can do is wait. Commonly after an hour, the ears of the Opossum start to move slightly. This is your indicator to know that it's an actor :) After four hours of stiff ears, you can be pretty sure that you are looking down on a dead animal. Call the competent authority (local veterinarian, ...


13

According to Backpacker, and the National Park Service, peeing attracts some large predators because animals like the salty taste: ...urinate well away from camp on rock, sandy areas, or duff. Animals are attracted to salts in urine... I would argue, therefore, that urinating around your campsite is not a good idea when near large predatory animals. ...


13

Unless the animal had entrails spilling out or was dragging its paralyzed hindquarters, probably best to give it the benefit of the doubt. It might recover.


13

Having been around moose before, I would say that is would have been better to either stop and wait for the moose to leave or swing in a wide loop around the moose. In some areas like Grand Teton National Park, it is illegal to approach closer than 25 yards and you can be given a ticket. I have never seen moose act aggressively towards a human, but I ...


12

No! Don't do this with your own hands. You can't kill him instantly without pain and without blood. If you try to break his neck, very surely you won't know the correct moves which is needed for that, and you will cause only terrible pain for him. His neck is much stronger as you would think. The surest way is if you take him to an animal ambulance and let ...


12

In Mexico, I learned that the best way to deal with wild dogs was to squat down very briefly and pick up a small stone. I never had to actually chuck it at a dog. They skulked off quite quickly when they saw the movement that looked like the human was picking up a small rock.


12

I'm going to give some things to look for, but none of these are definite giveaways. It is very unlikely you will be able to tell a barely used human made trail from a game trail. Hikers like to be very obvious about the trails they make, and established trails are well worn. If a trail is very narrow, has undisturbed or barely disturbed ground cover, and ...


11

Yes! Not a silly question at all and surprisingly easy to answer: yes! There are even sound-systems exactly for that use. Try sound. Sound can have an excellent impact on a coyote that has wandered into your yard or campsite. Try banging trash can lids or anything else that is noisy to scare the coyote off. Yell and make a lot of noise ...


11

I've encountered moose on several occasions. The first was when I was a boy while walking through the woods on the way to school, I was on the trail through the woods that connected to the upper part of town when I came up behind a big moose. I stopped, backed away slow, then as nonchalantly as possible turned my back to the moose and walked away. When I got ...


11

I'll answer the slightly broader question "How should I plan my first backpacking trip in Oregon or California?" (with emphasis on California, since that is the area I know best) Since you are mentioning fishing and hunting, I am going to lead with permits. Make sure that fishing and hunting is permitted in the areas you are considering. Hunting is not ...


10

That looks like the spine and pelvis of a raccoon: . Although the raccoon is not native to Germany, they were introduced there in the 1930s and can be found in the wild. The map below shows raccoons killed or found dead 2001-2003. So while it's highly unlikely that you stumbled across the remains of a raccoon, it is possible. See wikipedia for more ...


10

Coincidentally one of the physicians of Tropical Disease at a major Toronto Hospital has recently done a write up on ticks and how to deal with them. You can find the full article here. Here is the relevant part in case the link breaks in the future. What you can do: Insect repellants are effective at keeping ticks away. Dr. Keystone also recommends ...


9

I basically agree with Escoce's answer but you should give the snake a little more time. In the most cases it tries to avoid you and will flee as soon as you come too near. Escoce: The best thing to do is just avoid it completely. If you can't go around because the brush is too thick. Then find a plenty long enough stick and get it off the path. ...


8

Two parts to this answer: First, I am playing around with some statistics on assaults and murders in the US National Parks, and I am coming to the conclusion that the most dangerous animal in the outdoors is homo sapiens, who will be attracted by your fire. Second, maybe 20 years ago I read a speculation by a respected anthropologist, the gist of which was ...


8

It would probably be best to leave the task of euthanizing the animal to the professionals, unless you are absolutely certain that the animal is enduring intense pain and suffering, and has no chance of recovering. If the animal is clearly dying a slow and painful death, you can ease its suffering, but if you're uncertain or uncomfortable doing it, you'll ...


8

Each species and possibly even each individual animal will behave very differently. A good rule of thumb is: if wildlife reacts to you, you are too close. I think this is the most general way to answer you question and has the benefit of giving you instantaneous feedback. If the animal looks straight at you, back off until it resumes what it was doing. The ...


8

The thing here to consider most is the biodegradability of what is littered along a roadside. There are items which you can leave and will breakdown pretty quickly - like tissues, papers, and thinner cardboards - though 'quickly' is relative, they will degrade faster than plastics. And most food waste, though things like apple cores are acidic, it's not a ...



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