New answers tagged

1

Stay inside. Being outside is fraught with dangers. There is good advice here. I lean more to the "inspection after the fact" camp. I don't think prevention is statistically better than inspection enough to warrant the expense and time required to do so. I believe it would detract from the experience and start the excursion off with a mindset of fear ...


4

Ticks are arachnoids and have an interesting life-cycle that you must understand if you want to avoid them. What this diagram doesn't explain is how the tick seeks a host. There may be as many as five blood meals in the life of a tick. Each is followed by moulting after which the tick climbs tall grass. It hangs from the end of a frond, waving barbed ...


4

I'm a bit surprised to see that nobody else as suggested this, but powder the top of your shoes/socks and bottom of your pants with sulfur. Powdered sulfur is available at local feed/ranch stores, and maybe even Wal-Mart or Lowes, depending on where you are. It's inexpensive and you can use an old sock as a very effective applicator. So as the others have ...


11

Coincidentally one of the physicians of Tropical Disease at a major Toronto Hospital has recently done a write up on ticks and how to deal with them. You can find the full article here. Here is the relevant part in case the link breaks in the future. What you can do: Insect repellants are effective at keeping ticks away. Dr. Keystone also recommends ...


6

(I'm adding this as an answer, because it addresses some points in the original question as well as supplementing the tips given by other answerers, but although it's kind of supplementary, it is too long to be a comment. If that's not correct SE etiquette, please let me know, but I thought the guidance was important enough to be added here.) Avoidance ...


-1

Around where I live, there is a very small species of tick that does not carry the disease, but causes a very unpleasant itch. Seeing them (before or after the fact) is difficult (magnifying glass stuff). The one tip that seems to work is adding about a cup of Dettol to your bath water (this product may not be available where you live). Also seems to work on ...


7

Disclaimer: I have to deal with the possibility of 'mingling' with Ticks on an almost daily basis during the summer. And generally speaking am pretty up to date on 'tick stuff' however do not only take my word for it - Lyme Disease is serious - definitely look stuff up. First off, Lyme Disease is only transmitted by certain 'subspecies' of ticks. (If you'...


19

You will pick up ticks by spending a lot of time outdoors, but I routinely find them after walking across 10 ft of grass between my car and my front door. No matter how much prevention you practice, keep an eye out for Lyme symptoms, and go to the doctor for antibiotics if they show up. A vaccine would be much nicer. The socks-in-your pants method is very ...


8

avoid grass and shrubs; keep your clothings shut tight, i.e. there should be as less places for the tick to get to your body as possible; wrap socks around pants, wear long-sleeved shirt, put something on your head; inspect yourself from time to time - especially after you've been to dense plants area; very simple, but still effective (saved me a couple of ...


17

Probably the single most important thing I do is to tuck the bottom of my pants into the socks. Ticks like to crawl upwards. If they drop onto your feet, they will crawls upwards on your leg looking for the first bit of soft skin with blood vessels close to the surface. If they can get inside your pants, they will find such skin eventually. Otherwise, ...


7

In order to understand the question of rabies and whether or not an animal is rabid, a little background information is necessary. Once rabies infection occurs, the virus grows in muscle tissue and may go undetected for several days or months. During this incubation (or latent) period, the animal appears healthy and shows no sign of infection. ...


4

From the Humane Society Nocturnal animals active in the daytime or vice versa. Excessive drooling Lack of fear of humans Aggressive behavior It does note that there is both a "furious" form where they may act agitated and a "dumb" form where they may act drunk. From the Merck Veterinary Manual Paralysis Seizures Inability to swallow Also the type of ...


11

I'll answer the slightly broader question "How should I plan my first backpacking trip in Oregon or California?" (with emphasis on California, since that is the area I know best) Since you are mentioning fishing and hunting, I am going to lead with permits. Make sure that fishing and hunting is permitted in the areas you are considering. Hunting is not ...


2

Mature bull caribou generally are bigger than females, have much bigger antlers, and behave with a lot more confidence and machismo, especially during the rut. If you watch a group of caribou for a while, even from a distance, it's pretty easy to pick out the mature males. The advice in the Alaska hunting regulations about determining sex is very ...


-5

You are asking whether your husband (who I assume is a meat eater) walking towards an animal out-weighing him by a factor of 5 or 10 did something fairly stupid? No. I mean there's no way the moose didn't learn in moose school that predators walking towards them aren't threats unless they are carrying thunder sticks. Unless its rutting season. Then he did ...


3

Here in Fairbanks, Alaska, moose encounters are pretty common. Your husband and the moose handled it the way most experienced people and moose around here would... cautiously but confidently. Sometimes they won't move off the trail unless you communicate your intention by getting closer. Moose will not usually become aggressive unless you do something to ...


11

I've encountered moose on several occasions. The first was when I was a boy while walking through the woods on the way to school, I was on the trail through the woods that connected to the upper part of town when I came up behind a big moose. I stopped, backed away slow, then as nonchalantly as possible turned my back to the moose and walked away. When I got ...


20

"Mynd you, møøse bites Kan be pretti nasti..." Moose attacks are common in North America. This is largely due to population numbers (you'll see more moose than bear) as much as people's lack of understanding of the risk. People will approach them, attempt to pet them, etc. If left alone, moose will ordinarily leave you alone. However, they can be ...


13

Having been around moose before, I would say that is would have been better to either stop and wait for the moose to leave or swing in a wide loop around the moose. In some areas like Grand Teton National Park, it is illegal to approach closer than 25 yards and you can be given a ticket. I have never seen moose act aggressively towards a human, but I ...



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