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13

Yaktrax advertises products intended to help with this, which might be less damaging to interior surfaces than crampons. You can find some SE discussion on those kinds of products here. Keeping a low center of gravity can reduce probability of injury by reducing how far you fall. Positioning yourself so that if you do fall, a softer part of your body ...


7

Here at south Russia, we have lots of ice surfaces every winter and need to walk around. So, practical experience: The simplest option to reduce slipping will be to just glue some hard waterproof low-grit (approx 60-120 grit) sanding paper on the bottom of your shoes. This is often used here amongst aging people that are less agile due to their age. If ...


7

This actually happens to be pretty relevant to Physics(so it's kind of odd it was migrated away from the Physics.SE). You were actually on the right track with the penguin idea and increasing your co-efficient of friction. The graphic in this article has been floating around the internet for a while now. It's pretty self-explanatory, but the gist of it is ...


6

Are rubber soles the best alternative to heavy boots, or has anyone found another material that maximises friction with the ice? Rubber soles will have zero effect on ice. You need something that will dig into the ice to stop you slipping, rubber suffers from the same issues as any other material, it simply cannot get enough traction on the ice. ...


5

There's a lot that you can do in regards to walking style: Avoid walking on the ice if you can. (if it's a poorly cleared sidewalk, and there's snow on grass near it, walk in the snow) If it's a layer of ice over a base of snow, crack the ice by walking heel first (and really put your weight into it), so that you create footprints in the snow rather than ...


3

Layers of fleece plus a very wind resistant outer shell. Anything else (Carhartt type clothes, leather, Mongolian reindeer skins...) will be heavy as heck. Full face coverage would be smart, but it looks like you'll have a windshield at least. Since you'll spend time riding in the cold wind, the conditions will be similar to snowmobiling. Try snowmobiling ...


3

If your aim is just to avoid falling, do as WBT suggests and get some ice-grips. These can be put on and removed in seconds and can be carried in a small bag or even a pocket. But if you get UK-type weather, in which ice is often patchy, avoid grips that use what look like steel springs. These are easily broken on hard surfaces like pavement. Better ...


3

Approaching this from a physics standpoint, the primary reason people slip on ice is due to low friction. I personally think this is not the case, but rather, the low friction is the gunpowder to the bullet that is sliding, but the trigger is not the low friction. The real trigger (in my opinion of course) is force. It is impossible to move without force, ...


2

My best solution for this is to wear a pair of flexible running shoes with spikes. The spikes are at the front; walk towards your toes to make sure the spikes dig in. Team them with warm socks for insulation (and remember a half-size larger than your normal shoes for comfort!) You can also get undersoles with spikes for ordinary shoes. Like as not, someone ...


2

So far, no one has stated the obvious: Don't step on ice! Walk on snow, bare pavement, rough ground, lawns, flowerbeds, or whatever alternatives there might be. When stepping on ice is unavoidable, here are some observations which can make slipping less likely: Ice is most slippery when it is at freezing temperatures (32 °F/ 0 °C). When it ...


1

It is possible to get the gear relatively cheap. Search on ebay or the kind. Search on internet forums where outdoor enthusiasts hang around and offer their used gear on a market place. I know such forums for Germany and Austria but I am sure you will find the kind in Canada too. I have to say I trust those guys more compared to ebay because I think there ...


1

Emergency Method of Walking a Short Distance on Ice Without Slipping: If you find yourself on ice unexpectedly and you don't have far to go, an emergency option is to remove your shoes/boots entirely and walk in your stocking feet. This is obviously not a good idea if you're not going to be indoors within a couple of minutes, but if you're just walking ...


1

Not a real answer to your question, but maybe it helps. In Holland we use a lot of salt during the winter to lower the melting point of the snow/ice (as a result, we have an abundant salt water vegetation along highways even far inland). This may be a good solution around your home? When not meant for consumption, salt is very inexpensive (we pay like $2 for ...


1

I've been attending school in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, USA. We get ridiculous amounts of snow (for the US anyway) and ice. Generally, when I slip on the ice, my feet slide out from under me to my front, and I land on my behind. To counter this, I've learned to walk with shorter steps, keeping most of my weight on the balls of my feet as opposed to ...



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