Hot answers tagged

21

One thing you can look into are long-legged thermal underwear - this wouldn't effect how you look on the outside as they go under your clothes and create an insulating layer to help keep you warm. Women can get away with this in everyday life with a nice pair of tights. So for city life, as you stated, this should mean no difference in your every day ...


17

So, first of all there is no alpha male! An alpha male only exists in captive wolf packs but never ever in the wild. Further reading about this topic here for example. The pack you've encountered was a family of three (more likely in January) or two generations. The average pack consists of a family of 5–11 animals (1–2 adults, 3–6 juveniles and 1–3 ...


14

Yaktrax advertises products intended to help with this, which might be less damaging to interior surfaces than crampons. You can find some SE discussion on those kinds of products here. Keeping a low center of gravity can reduce probability of injury by reducing how far you fall. Positioning yourself so that if you do fall, a softer part of your body ...


10

Long thick socks will help in 2 ways -- they'll reduce heat loss through your feet/lower calves and reduce draughts up your legs. Even 2 pairs of normal socks would be better than nothing. There are special thermal socks (sold as heat-holders for example) but they may not fit in your shoes. This could be regarded as in addition to thermal underwear. If ...


9

The physicists answer: there could be such a measure (it exists for example for the insulation of buildings), but it would in the case of clothing depend on so many factors that it would be close to useless. Factors that have an influence here are things like physical activity, wind, humidity or personal disposition. To begin with the last one: There are ...


9

TLDR As long as you can walk normally (using the whole foot not just the toe area) always hold your axe at its head with the blade pointing backwards. More information This depends on the situation you are in. The text from Grivel seems to be a oversimplification. There is not just one technique for ascending and one for descending. There are two basic ...


8

Always bring plenty of layers, so you can add/remove as necessary. When I cross country ski, I often end up very warm. Even if it's only 20°F out I may be skiing in a synthetic T-shirt. The important thing is to have the warm clothes available to put on when you stop or if the weather worsens. Should you bring a fleece jacket? 100% yes! Do you have ...


8

I also can't offer answers to all your problems but on a couple of points: 2) Coconut oil is very good at restoring moisture to your skin. It's quite 'light' in that it won't leave a greasy film on your skin and given how little you need to use it's very cheap. I've also been told that a thin layer of Vaseline on your skin will help prevent it from getting ...


8

This can be calculated using a property called cryoscopic constant Kf which links the concentration of a solved substance to the freezing point depression Td: Td = m * Kf where m is the molality which is the amount of mols of solved substance per kg of solvent (here water). For water Kf is 1.86K*kg/mol and the molar mass of sugar (sucrose) is 342g/mol. So ...


7

They're not cheap, but they exist: http://www.rei.com/product/871649/outdoor-research-stormtracker-heated-gloves http://www.outdoorresearch.com/en/stormtracker-heated-gloves.html


7

This actually happens to be pretty relevant to Physics(so it's kind of odd it was migrated away from the Physics.SE). You were actually on the right track with the penguin idea and increasing your co-efficient of friction. The graphic in this article has been floating around the internet for a while now. It's pretty self-explanatory, but the gist of it is ...


7

Here at south Russia, we have lots of ice surfaces every winter and need to walk around. So, practical experience: The simplest option to reduce slipping will be to just glue some hard waterproof low-grit (approx 60-120 grit) sanding paper on the bottom of your shoes. This is often used here amongst aging people that are less agile due to their age. If ...


7

Yes and don't even think about leaving your fleece at home... Even if you are moving fast and therefore producing a lot of warmth by the exercise there is always the possibility to get into bad weather. And if not, what are you doing when you stop for a break? You are wearing wet clothing and it is cold. Maybe even windy. This will feel really cold and you ...


7

I can't answer the rest, but for here's my 2c worth for gloves. Layering : As with other clothes, layering gloves is worth doing. I'd try fairly thin liner gloves inside either mitts or a larger glove than you'd normally wear. This gives an extra layer of insulation, but also means you can just take the outer layer off when you need more dexterity than ...


7

Related (4) there you see that (3) is working. There are definitively ways to get used to a colder environment. Of course it's also a matter of faculty/predisposition but still you can train it e.g. with increasing your willpower. Check out Wim Hof who is an expert in surviving cold situations. He can stay in ice water for nearly 2 hours straight. Everybody ...


6

It depends on the filter. Many filters use microtubules. If there is water in the filter and the snow freezes that water then you may crack the microtubules. You'll likely have no indication that you just broke your filter, potentially leading to the consumption of contaminated water.


6

Are rubber soles the best alternative to heavy boots, or has anyone found another material that maximises friction with the ice? Rubber soles will have zero effect on ice. You need something that will dig into the ice to stop you slipping, rubber suffers from the same issues as any other material, it simply cannot get enough traction on the ice. ...


6

The cheapest ways to try cross country skiing are borrowing equipment, yard sale equipment, craigslist, or rentals. If you like it, and rent frequently, that stops being cheap. If you make friends who run or are otherwise active, ask around, and someone might have a spare set of skis and poles they can lend you - you can find them for a few dollars at yard ...


6

Your criteria: a full day with a decent chunk of inactivity, cold but not frigid, with some precipitation. Normally when active outdoors in such weather I wear softshell pants (schoeller-type fabrics, such as Arc'teryx Gamma LT or Marmot Scree pants) and a lightweight or silkweight baselayer. This provides wind and water resistance, won't make me overheat, ...


6

Another option is flannel-lined jeans. I find them more comfortable and simple than thermal underwear, and they are very warm in the winter. You also have the option of adding the thermal underwear if you are still too cold. What kind to get is a matter of personal preference, and what kind of jeans you would typically wear. Amazon lists a selection of many ...


6

When you think of the amount of wool we normally wear and use - and how it behaves - the only reason a wool garment would stink is that the wool hasn't been properly processed. This document is bit of an eye-opener. https://oecotextiles.wordpress.com/2009/08/11/what-does-organic-wool-mean/ On average, each ton of greasy wool contains: 150 KG ...


6

It's pretty easy to keep your water from freezing without adding anything to it, actually. If you keep it under your shell, your body heat will keep it from freezing. If you bury it under a foot or so of snow, it will stay liquid overnight (although you may get a little ice around the edges). If you boil it and put your hot water bottle in your sleeping bag, ...


5

You could try wearing a pair of sweats under your pants. I've done that before, and was quite warm, and comfortable. Pajamas are also an option.


5

There's a lot that you can do in regards to walking style: Avoid walking on the ice if you can. (if it's a poorly cleared sidewalk, and there's snow on grass near it, walk in the snow) If it's a layer of ice over a base of snow, crack the ice by walking heel first (and really put your weight into it), so that you create footprints in the snow rather than ...


5

Here's based on my experience of bicycling in Toronto in winter (a daily 18km / one-hour each-way commute) ... Don't let your hands and feet (fingers and toes) get cold. They don't have a lot of fat and blood circulation and muscle (I guess they're mostly bone and tendon) so they need insulation. It's been decades since I last cross-country-skied but when I ...


5

The answers is to simply get a proper 4 season tent designed for camping in the winter. There's a reason why 4 season tents are different than 3 season tents, and that reason is because the weather and temperature of that fourth season (winter) is much harsher than the other three. You are not going to find a 3 season tent that performs as well as a 4 ...


5

Layers are useful, but I've found upper body layering more critical (and easier to alter- you don't need to take your boots off). For me, the question is how much wind will there be, and how active are you? typically for back country XC skiing, I'll wear light base layer, loose fitting wind & water resistant hiking pants. Once in camp & out of the ...


5

First of all, stop strenuous activity. If possible, get back into a warmer environment. If not, breathe through your nose as much as possible. This can also be used as a preventative measure. Hydrate properly.


4

I am not exactly the guy who have been doing that year by year, but I have some thoughts about cleaning and packing the gear after a high altitude expedition. I think some of it can be applied to your scenario. I would first soap-wash (if recommended) the gear so that there is no dirt. Dirt, deposited and remained there over the longer period time can ...


4

If you are going to live in the tent, get a canvas wall tent and a stove. It will be much more livable over the long term even if it costs a bit more up front. I found a lot of information about and pictures of "hot tenting" here. I've always wanted to try it. If you are going to camp every weekend, get a good 4-season tent like those recommended in other ...



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