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9

Given that the active ingredient is capsaicin which is used in self-defence sprays for all types of purposes, bear spray should be effective on anything with tear ducts, soft tissue, sinuses, eyeballs, etc, (and will totally dominate a bean burrito**). The discriminating difference between "bear spray" vs "self-defense" spray, vs. law enforcement ...


6

Wolf attacks are incredibly rare whereas bear attacks are more common. Typically wolves are afraid of humans and will actively avoid contact. Humans are the predator typically in wolf encounters so they are much more afraid of us than we of them. That said wolves have been known to attack humans, normally when driven by hunger or disease (rabies). When they ...


4

According to @mojzis' link, there is a chance of wolves: So perhaps the most useful recommendation would be to speak to locals in each area you travel to, to understand what areas are considered safe, and whether they have local guidelines on food storage, proximity to open areas, gun permits etc. And of course that guidance would hold for any such ...


4

Chemically, if you can use it, I see no reason why it wouldn't work on any similar animals - though practically it may not be as effective. In terms of cougars for instance, this seems to imply it'll work if you can get it out and use it in time, but because of their nature the chances of you being able to carry out the task successfully are dramatically ...


1

You should have some deterrents, such as bear spray or air-horn. Wolves will generally not harm you though they can often approach you (at least here in BC) and in this instance, the recommended advice is to make them believe that you are a threat to them, by shouting, banging, etc.. Bear spray can be used as a last resort.



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