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13

All land in the UK is owned by somebody, therefore, all trees and their produce (including firewood) are owned by somebody. You could be charged with theft if you take logs, kindling etc. without permission. The Jeremy Vine Show on BBC Radio 2 on 6th January 2012 discussed this very topic following the storms in the UK around that time, that left a lot of ...


10

Yes, some sources create toxic smoke/fumes, notably: Oleander Rhododendron Poison Ivy (smoke can cause lung damage in some cases) I'm not sure of a comprehensive list, but be wary of any poisonous wood / shrub, it's probably more likely to burn toxic. As pointed out in the comment, unless you can identify vines well then it may be a good idea to stay ...


9

I have to say that "eating with" falls under the same rules as "eating". Don't go out in the woods and put something in your mouth unless you know exactly what you are dealing with. Many woods are toxic. Also remember that "wood" doesn't just come from trees, but all woody plants, which is why some shrubs are also listed here. Specifically avoid the ...


8

I think a list of dangers is potentially useful, but not a "single answer" question so I'm going to make this a CW -- Add your stuff here: Hypothermia Falls leading to mechanical injury or head trauma Getting lost and dying of dehydration/starvation Biological illness through drinking tainted water (protozoa, bacteria, etc.) Poisoning from chemically ...


7

I would say it depends on what other materials you have and how cold the water is. So if the water is cold, it's really important to stay out of it. If not, you can maybe endure having your feet hanging in, for example. It also depends on how much time you have to build the raft. If you're in an emergency situation, don't even try a burn out canoe, it's too ...


7

Poisonous plants are typically more dangerous when you burn them, at least that's true with plants that have oily toxins (poison ivy/oak). Toxins in plants aren't necessarily vaporized when burned. Smoke is a particulate, not a vapour. If you are burning something toxic, the toxins can potentially be carried by particles of smoke and be inhaled which is far ...


7

Heartwood, assuming the definition on Wikipedia as basically just the middle of the tree that is no longer growing, is indeed what you will be burning most of the time as fuel for your fire. Considering it has not been growing for some time, it may well be somewhat drier than the surrounding sapwood, and therefore actually burn better. That said, the ...


6

Many pine woods will leave your food tasting of turpentine. Depending on the wood, it won't be enough to be toxic, but will still (imo) be a very unpleasant flavor. Generally, due to my experience (in the southeast) this has developed into "don't use evergreens." Avoid woods with much rot. Avoid wood with mosses, fungus, etc. Burn larger diameter wood ...


6

At least for some species, Rhododendron wood is not especially toxic when burned. I've seen (and used) many species of Rhododendron in the Chinese Himalaya as firewood, in both outdoor and drafty indoor conditions. This included seasoned and unseasoned wood, and large enough quantities of smoke that my Rite-in-The-Rain notebooks still smell like bacon. ...


5

When I built my canoe, the front and back keel stems needed to be bent. I steamed the wood by putting it in some ABS pipe and putting that over a kettle. It's been over 25 years, but I think there was cloth stuffed at the top of the pipe to keep the steam in, or something like that. I left the wood steaming until it was warm and soft, and then clamped it in ...


4

There's no safe wood I've found that's made food taste really bad - generally if it does taste absolutely foul I'd be wary that something else was up. In the grand scheme of things though, it depends what you class as "bad". Different people prefer different flavours, and in that sense using different types of wood can definitely make foods taste different. ...


3

I think the most likely is actually hypothermia. All it takes is being a little unprepared and getting caught in wet and windy conditions a little above freezing. If you don't deal with that right away, things just deteriorate and then dealing with it properly gets less and less likely until you're unable to deal with anything at all. I'd say number 2 is ...


2

From the link @Amine posted, the following areas are key: For the keel area check the joints between planks and frames visually, looking for gaps or any sign that the plank is not tight against the frame. Then use a screw driver to test the wood for softness on both plank and frame near the mating surface. Try to slip the pry bar under the frame and pry ...



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