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Feb
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
4
revised Is it ever necessary to double up locking carabiners?
added 1148 characters in body
Feb
4
awarded  Self-Learner
Feb
4
comment Why are eye friction hitches not commonly used in rock climbing?
@Benedikt A just-in-case FYI: there is a "figure 9" knot that is supposed to be easy to untie; I've just never actually seen anybody use one.
Feb
4
comment Why are eye friction hitches not commonly used in rock climbing?
@Chris You can buy them pre-made but bulk cord of the right type can be spliced as well if one has the tools and know-how.
Feb
3
comment How to repair the ripped seam in my leather cowboy boots?
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it does not specifically relate to outdoor activities.
Feb
3
comment How to calculate the force (kN) generated by a falling climber onto their protection?
It still won't provide a direct answer to this question but for anyone fascinated by such calculations this software appears to be the best on the market: vrigger.com
Feb
3
comment How to calculate the force (kN) generated by a falling climber onto their protection?
"There is another surprising factor of 2, which is that in the special case where f=0, we get T=2mg, which is a little surprising. You would think that in a factor-zero fall, the rope would just support body weight. But the peak tension is actually more than body weight, because the rope stretches and the person does fall down through some height." Isn't the reason in this equation simply the pulley effect mentioned in the paragraph right before this? "This is because there are two strands pulling down on the pro ..." -- you made it sound like two separate effects. +1 however.
Feb
3
revised What is the difference between “dry rope”, “non-dry rope” and “dry core rope”?
deleted 1 character in body
Feb
3
comment What to do when you run out of rope on a sports climb?
@mattnz I think it is worse than that. If I am remembering my instruction correctly one should never rappel off of soft goods, only hardware, because if while rappelling one strand of rope starts feeding faster than the other the rope can rapidly burn through the sling. I am not qualified to speak authoritatively on this but, again IIRC, my instructor took part in a body recovery that resulted from this malpractice, and that's quite enough to keep me far away from it.
Feb
3
answered Why are eye friction hitches not commonly used in rock climbing?
Feb
2
comment Why are eye friction hitches not commonly used in rock climbing?
@Benedik That's an excellent point. I don't think I've ever seen a figure-9 in the wild however and I am not confident I could check one on sight. Bulin is the same as bowline I am assuming.
Feb
2
comment Why are eye friction hitches not commonly used in rock climbing?
Re: (4) No, that is what I wanted. A lot of experienced climbers use the rope itself as a personal anchor but I was taught the use of a Purcell because it also has use in rope ascension / self-rescue.
Feb
2
awarded  Nice Question
Feb
2
awarded  equipment
Feb
1
revised Why are eye friction hitches not commonly used in rock climbing?
improve accuracy
Feb
1
awarded  Suffrage
Feb
1
comment Why do big wall harnesses have two belay loops?
@Dakatine firstascent.co.uk/climb/ocun-quattro-tech-harness.html apparently
Feb
1
comment Why are eye friction hitches not commonly used in rock climbing?
Thanks for your answer. A few more questions if you please: (1) Would you ask your arborist friend what he uses and why? (fixed tail, split tail, whatever.) (2) Do you have a reference for the use of a single ended Prusik as you describe? I cannot think of a reason for it to fail but at the same time I like to know that things are well tested before using them myself. (3) The "Englaender-Prusik" sounds like what I know as an autoblock; is it? (4) What do you use as a personal anchor?
Feb
1
answered What is the difference between “dry rope”, “non-dry rope” and “dry core rope”?