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Feb
10
comment How to safely train for and grip pockets?
I am sincerely appreciative of you taking the time to answer my question. Please forgive the cross-examination; I am only trying to be as careful as possible. Do you mean relaxed mentally or physiologically? If I mentally relax and just pull my fingers drop into the lower position shown in i.stack.imgur.com/J1CCl.jpg (less the thumb lock), which I am trying to avoid as I presently believe it increases the chance of injury. Keeping them from dropping requires effort. Is that effort good if it keeps the fingers in a more relaxed position?
Feb
10
comment How to safely train for and grip pockets?
"You should attempt to keep the fingers not being trained, loose (not crimped and not clenched)." -- (1) Do you have a reference for that? (2) That seems even harder! How do you relax fingers that are not fully independent? As soon as I pull hard they start moving on their own. :-(
Feb
10
comment Which fingers to use in a 2 finger pocket when rock climbing?
@lejonet Oh, that's why it looked funny! :-S Since there are no muscles in the fingers this should have been obvious but I just brushed over it and kept reading.
Feb
10
comment How to safely train for and grip pockets?
You say "stretch after." Why after and not before? One of the changes I have made is to perform a few specific hand stretches before climbing or training, as I am under the impression that this will help. I was warmed up but not fatigued at the time of the injury, but I had not stretched my hands. By "100%" I meant trying as hard as I could, not being casual about it. I now wonder how the person who told me to train at "60-70%" meant it.
Feb
10
comment How to safely train for and grip pockets?
"unfortunately" -- not for you :-)
Feb
10
comment Making a Make-Shift harness from Tape-Slings
Could you provide a picture of that, please?
Feb
10
comment How to safely train for and grip pockets?
@Liam You raise a very good point, and I probably will visit someone if I can find anyone I trust to understand these things. (A family member went to a local hand specialist for something else and returned thoroughly unimpressed.) Here I am looking for general guidelines. E.g. (1)Do most good climbers hold back the dropped fingers as in the penultimate image, or do they flex them down as in the last one? (2)Has anyone else here suffered from this, or anything else related to splitting fingers? (3)Is hangboarding at near 100% foolish? etc.
Feb
10
comment Which fingers to use in a 2 finger pocket when rock climbing?
@Rory How does that help?
Feb
10
comment Which fingers to use in a 2 finger pocket when rock climbing?
Interesting anatomy lesson but I do not understand how it supports your conclusion. "... if you were to grab a deep pocket with your middle and forefinger, there is absolutely nothing you can do to prevent your ring finger from curling ..." Okay, so what? If you use your middle and ring fingers the pinky curls. I seem to be missing the point.
Feb
4
comment Why are eye friction hitches not commonly used in rock climbing?
@Benedikt A just-in-case FYI: there is a "figure 9" knot that is supposed to be easy to untie; I've just never actually seen anybody use one.
Feb
4
comment Why are eye friction hitches not commonly used in rock climbing?
@Chris You can buy them pre-made but bulk cord of the right type can be spliced as well if one has the tools and know-how.
Feb
3
comment How to repair the ripped seam in my leather cowboy boots?
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it does not specifically relate to outdoor activities.
Feb
3
comment How to calculate the force (kN) generated by a falling climber onto their protection?
It still won't provide a direct answer to this question but for anyone fascinated by such calculations this software appears to be the best on the market: vrigger.com
Feb
3
comment How to calculate the force (kN) generated by a falling climber onto their protection?
"There is another surprising factor of 2, which is that in the special case where f=0, we get T=2mg, which is a little surprising. You would think that in a factor-zero fall, the rope would just support body weight. But the peak tension is actually more than body weight, because the rope stretches and the person does fall down through some height." Isn't the reason in this equation simply the pulley effect mentioned in the paragraph right before this? "This is because there are two strands pulling down on the pro ..." -- you made it sound like two separate effects. +1 however.
Feb
3
comment What to do when you run out of rope on a sports climb?
@mattnz I think it is worse than that. If I am remembering my instruction correctly one should never rappel off of soft goods, only hardware, because if while rappelling one strand of rope starts feeding faster than the other the rope can rapidly burn through the sling. I am not qualified to speak authoritatively on this but, again IIRC, my instructor took part in a body recovery that resulted from this malpractice, and that's quite enough to keep me far away from it.
Feb
2
comment Why are eye friction hitches not commonly used in rock climbing?
@Benedik That's an excellent point. I don't think I've ever seen a figure-9 in the wild however and I am not confident I could check one on sight. Bulin is the same as bowline I am assuming.
Feb
2
comment Why are eye friction hitches not commonly used in rock climbing?
Re: (4) No, that is what I wanted. A lot of experienced climbers use the rope itself as a personal anchor but I was taught the use of a Purcell because it also has use in rope ascension / self-rescue.
Feb
1
comment Why do big wall harnesses have two belay loops?
@Dakatine firstascent.co.uk/climb/ocun-quattro-tech-harness.html apparently
Feb
1
comment Why are eye friction hitches not commonly used in rock climbing?
Thanks for your answer. A few more questions if you please: (1) Would you ask your arborist friend what he uses and why? (fixed tail, split tail, whatever.) (2) Do you have a reference for the use of a single ended Prusik as you describe? I cannot think of a reason for it to fail but at the same time I like to know that things are well tested before using them myself. (3) The "Englaender-Prusik" sounds like what I know as an autoblock; is it? (4) What do you use as a personal anchor?
Feb
1
comment Is it ever necessary to double up locking carabiners?
I think perhaps I misunderstood your point, or viewpoint. I have top-roped off of O&O non-locking 'biners, and I feel OK about that, but I would not use a single locking carabiner in their place. I do feel that O&O lockers is still more secure, and prefer that setup for something I don't have eyes on, e.g. top-rope anchor. For something I do have eyes on I feel OK with a single beefy locker. I would like to lift my down-vote but I cannot unless someone edits your post and my vote is now locked.