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Jun
16
comment “Used” top rope when bouldering
@BenCrowell Please see my addendum. I mean you no disrespect, but as stated there I believe the subject matter warrants fastidious scrutiny.
Jun
16
comment When should I retire my rope
@BenCrowell I agree with (my understanding of) what you wrote. All I meant to communicate is that a short factor-1 fall puts (almost*) as much stress on the rope as a long factor-1 fall, just over a shorter area, which I think is what you just said, but more clearly. (* Almost, because there are common energy absorbing elements in the system besides the rope that do not change with the length of fall, therefore a very short factor-2 fall will not reach as high a peak force as a full-rope-length factor-2 fall, even momentarily, and the impulse is much longer as well.)
Jun
15
comment Resoling climbing shoes yourself
No experience, but this seems like the sort of thing on which you'd spend more in the processing of learning to do it right than you would having it done professionally, even repeatedly.
Jun
15
comment “Used” top rope when bouldering
@OutlawLemur Yes, so long as the rope is still serviceable according to the Beal guidelines. In a top-rope (slingshot) setup a fat, fuzzy rope will make it a little harder on the belayer, but not much else. For lead the same rope will cause much greater rope drag making it really hard on the leader unless the pitch is short, straight, and vertical. Of course if you mean by "only for comfort" that you don't intend to weight the rope, and is serves only as a true safety line, then I wouldn't anticipate much wear on the rope anyway.
Jun
14
comment “Used” top rope when bouldering
Ben, as a friendly heads-up I just posted an opposing answer. Please read it and rebut as appropriate.
Jun
14
comment When should I retire my rope
@BenCrowell Indeed, and I didn't mean to imply otherwise. I meant that comment a a parenthetical, and merely that gym falls can still put significant stress on a rope. I think there is a tendency to look at a short wall and figure it's small stuff and won't really stress your equipment, when in fact the forces can be quite high and they get concentrated on a short section of rope near the ends. Do you agree with that? Perhaps this answer wasn't the best place for this.
Jun
11
comment What are the first aid precautions to be taken in case of a snake bite?
You make many assertions but you don't explain them. Why shouldn't you wash the bite site? Why is caffeine bad? What sources can you cite?
Jun
11
comment Reliable supplier of Ultrafire batteries
I don't know if there even is such a thing as "genuine" when it comes to Ultrafire. I would not trust any Ultrafire batteries, and there are much better alternatives that are not expensive. Also if you want a C8 style flashlight look at a Convoy.
May
15
comment Gloves for knuckle protection that can get wet but not necessarily waterproof
Standard work gloves provide very little impact protection. Perhaps your thinking of something different from what I am. Would you include a few pictures?
May
15
comment Which mid-line knot is best suited for a trucker's hitch?
I'm surprised by that too. Nevertheless my second question remains: are you open to using webbing and/or additional hardware? I guess I'm asking of you are more interested in a solution to a broader problem, or the answer to this specific question.
May
15
comment Which mid-line knot is best suited for a trucker's hitch?
In my experience one way to make knots easier to untie is to use a smaller fraction of the cord's strength, meaning using a larger cord or rope for the same load. But that of course means more weight. Are you open to using webbing instead of cord? I think some of the methods used by slackliners, scaled down accordingly, might be useful.
May
15
comment Which mid-line knot is best suited for a trucker's hitch?
What size and type of rope or cordage are you using? By the way, I haven't heard of the span loop before; the first search result I found for it claims "it usually unties extremely easily." I guess you have found this not to be the case?
May
12
comment Commuting by canoe
The product link is broken. Could you please replace it with a product name/description and a picture directly in your post?
Apr
22
comment Non-gun hunting tools for small game
Marcus, did you every buy or build a slingshot and give it a try? (Not necessarily for hunting.) I'm curious about your experience.
Apr
4
comment Improving sport climbing skills
No time for a full answer now, but yes, based on received wisdom it will be more profitable and less likely to result in injury to simply climb for about one year before considering specific training tools. If you do train, train on "slopers" (where your entire fingers are in contact with the hold) -- see this answer for an explanation. Have fun climbing!
Mar
21
comment What do I do if I lose my belay plate?
@Ben I agree with Liam: it would be good to add that method as an answer. Apparently I don't remember it correctly. Three ovals is a lot more reasonable.
Mar
21
comment What do I do if I lose my belay plate?
@BenCrowell (1) I'm pretty sure I remember FotH saying that you must use oval carabiners for that setup. How many people are carrying six ovals these days? (2) There are several options to add friction to a Munter; one is extra turns on the spine as linked in the answer above; another is the "Super Munter.".
Mar
20
comment What do I do if I lose my belay plate?
Nice self Q&A. +1 on both. :-)
Mar
20
comment What do I do if I lose my belay plate?
@BenCrowell I remember seeing that in that book. I can't remember if it is supposed to be superior to the HMS; do you? I remember thinking that it would be easier to carry a second ATC than enough ovals to set that up.
Mar
16
comment What precautions are needed for caving
Could you give some examples of the kind of footwear that works best for caving?