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Dec
7
comment What is this marker stone
Then maybe it's marking the spot where the previous 125 mail wagons sank into the muck.
Dec
7
comment What is this marker stone
Just a guess, but BP could refer to Bundespost? That's the german post office, although theirs handles other communications means (or at least used to) also. I don't know what the markers might have been for, but that may give you some ideas on how to search.
Nov
30
comment Wood versus plastic trail signs?
@ab2: See the new answer I just posted. Let me know if you want any more details.
Nov
24
comment Wood versus plastic trail signs?
@ab2: It already has been decided earlier this year, and officially approved by our Conservation Commission for use on their properties. 2 signs have already been installed, and another 9 are ready to be installed. I also gave a talk on this at the annual MA state trails conference earlier this month. I'll try to post a detailed answer about it later (at work right now and only have time for this comment).
Nov
23
comment What's the safest way to hike up a steep slope in deep snow?
Where's the rest of that clip? It stops just as it gets really interesting where the snow and the skier are being funneled thru a constriction.
Nov
23
comment Is listening to music on earphones while hiking safe enough?
@Unsung: Rattlesnakes create sound by rattling, but it sounds more like a hiss. Its fairly high frequency and continuous. It's not at all like a baby rattle, for example. If you just played the sound to people that didn't know what it was, I think most would say that "hiss" is a better description than "rattle". I used "hiss" to describe what it sounds like, not how the sound is produced.
Nov
21
comment Is it safe to eat poison ivy berries since I don't react to the leaves?
Immunity to poison ivy can change unpredictably. I used be immune, but not any more. Now I get a pretty serious reaction. The same thing happened to my grandfather. He was immune and weeded poison ivy with his hands, until one day it didn't work for him anymore.
Nov
20
comment Wood versus plastic trail signs?
It went very well. I guess it's a hot topic with others too. The room was packed, with 15-20 more people standing in the back. The audience seemed interested and asked a lot of good questions. I heard later from others that the talk was well received, so I'm quite pleased.
Nov
18
comment In a survival situation what all I can use from a green coconut?
"coconut-tree" is a really bad tag, as coconut plants aren't trees, but palms.
Nov
10
comment Wood versus plastic trail signs?
@ab2: I don't see "fart" on any of the signs shown by Gerrit. In German, "Fahrt" can mean something like "a ride in a conveyance", like a drive in a car. "Fahren" is "to drive", and Fahrt is sortof an incidence of having driven or been driven or been taken on a ride in a vehicle.
Nov
8
comment Wood versus plastic trail signs?
I'm giving a talk on trail signs at the annual Massachusetts Trails Conference on 14 Nov. I would like to use your picture in that talk. Please let me know if I have your permission, what the picture credits should be, if you have high-res versions I can use, etc. To thwart spammers, I have set up temp0785@embedinc.com for this purpose, which I can delete after the talk. Thanks for any help you can provide.
Nov
8
comment Wood versus plastic trail signs?
I'm giving a talk on trail signs at the annual Massachusetts Trails Conference on 14 Nov. I would like to use some of your pictures in that talk. Please let me know if I have your permission, what the picture credits should be, if you have high-res versions I can use, etc. To thwart spammers, I have set up temp0785@embedinc.com for this purpose, which I can delete after the talk. Thanks for any help you can provide.
Nov
8
comment Wood versus plastic trail signs?
I'm giving a talk on trail signs at the annual Massachusetts Trails Conference on 14 Nov. I would like to use some of your pictures in that talk. Please let me know if I have your permission, what the picture credits should be, if you have high-res versions I can use, etc. To thwart spammers, I have set up temp0785@embedinc.com for this purpose, which I can delete after the talk. Thanks for any help you can provide.
Sep
20
comment Why do I never see robins in the woods?
@Liam: Yes. The same common name is applied to two different species on either side of the pond. The OP shows Ohio as his location, so it's a good assumption he is asking about the America robin, Turdus migratorius, not the European robin, Erithacus rubecula.
Sep
12
comment Is it dangerous to sleep in a tent alone in a forest in -20?
@tom: I wouldn't use Fahrenheit for scientific purposes, but it's actually a nicer scale than Celsius for human experiences. In the 21st century, we all have computers or calculators handy and can trivially convert from one unit to another. People can use whatever units they are comfortable with, and others can convert as needed. I have a good intuitive feel for what different F temps mean to me, so that's what I'm going to use. To me "-20C" is meaningless in terms of how cold that feels without converting to -4F. Convert as you like, but lose the holier than though attitude.
Sep
3
comment How to introduce individuals to the concept of Leave No Trace
@Ben: Burying toilet paper is perfectly reasonable in most wild settings. As with any good idea, there are always people that try to take it to the ridiculous extreme. If you truly want to leave no trace, then you can't go there at all. It's therefore a matter of degree. As with most "zero tolerance" rules, this one is silly and counterproductive. Everyone knows the tolerance isn't ever exactly zero, so stating it as such leaves no option but to ignore the rule.
Aug
29
comment What nocturnal animal sound am I hearing in the trees in Maine?
Without a recording, this will be very hard to answer. Many frogs can make bird-like sounds at night, just to name one of many possibilities. If nobody else hears them, then how do you know they are real? Do you hear these along with voices that say "must kill ..." and the like?
Aug
28
comment Snake dangers while hunting in the desert?
@Michael: It's more like several tens of thousands of square miles. The contiguous Kaibab, Coconino, Tonto, Apache/Sigreaves, Gila, and parts of the Prescott National Forest spanning from west of Flagstaff into western New Mexico is larger that Switzerland. And there's still plenty more national forest and BLM land just in AZ not in that contiguous patch.
Aug
28
comment Snake dangers while hunting in the desert?
@Weda: Yahoos is a name for the type of people who get rowdy and have little regard for anyone else or nature. When you find them outdoors, they won't be far from a beer cooler and the pickup truck they drove to get there. Favorite pastimes are downing beer, making a lot of noise, driving the pickup over whatever they can to flatten it, and shooting off guns. Especially after a few beers, they're not particular about what they shoot at. Go to Arizona and you'll see most every road sign, cactus, and jack rabbit has bullet holes.
Aug
25
comment Snake dangers while hunting in the desert?
I agree that a stationary person is very unlikely to be bitten by a snake. Snakes bite people because they feel threatened. A sitting person that they slithered up on wouldn't be very threatening. The highest danger in the desert is yahoos with guns, especially after having downed a sixpack. I've spent significant time in the Mojave Desert of AZ. While I've only seen snakes at a distance and running away, I've had a bullets fly by my me close enough to hear the whistling noise. The yahoos were shooting randomly and didn't know I was there.