926 reputation
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location Vancouver, Canada
age
visits member for 1 year, 4 months
seen Mar 20 at 7:02

I grew up savage and wild, riding dinosaurs and taming sharks.

Okay, I may have exaggerated just a little. I grew up in a kibbutz in the north of Israel, and spent the majority of my childhood playing outside. Really outside, as in creeks, rivers, canyons, mountains, forests and the like. I moved to Vancouver, BC Canada in late 2005, and discovered that most of my outdoors skills and training did not translate very well. The predators are bigger (and actually lethal,) and the need for water was replaced with the need for warmth and the ability to melt snow for water. The snow, cold, and an abundance of wetness were also quite new... This was a bit of a challenge. A lot of new things to learn and old skills to adapt. But eventually I learned the ways of the frigid north (okay, "the wet north," but that didn't sound as epic, did it?)

I have become a fan of the BC backcountry, with its beautiful and secluded mountains, glaciers, alpine meadows and crystal clear lakes. I have picked up rock climbing, mountaineering, ski touring and mountaineering, and ice climbing. These days I generally strive to spend at least half of my weekends in a year away from civilization.


Feb
1
awarded  Enlightened
Feb
1
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
22
awarded  Yearling
Nov
15
comment Placing protection efficiently when leading trad?
I never bother to get the unused biner off of cams. Partially because they are color coded, and partially because it's fiddly and I'd rather move up and finish the climb. I have biners reserved for my anchor, though.
Oct
21
comment Thermal insulation of truck cap
Is the bed metal? What is the cap made of? Metal is a fairly good heat conductor, and as such a pretty bad insulator. Heat proofing a truck bed would probably require lining up both the bed and the cap with some heat insulating material. Wood boards would work well, but you could give foam (yoga style) mats a try as well.
Sep
14
comment Does hiking with a dog in bear country increase or decrease your risk of a bear encounter?
I've actually heard stories from residents of how their dog saved them... But they're rare and probably over glorified.
Sep
9
comment Alternatives to retreating quickly when caught in a lightning storm when rock climbing?
@BenCrowell no, I mean potential difference. The pack is not a point contact, so it offers the current a path through which it can jump to a point of much lower voltage than its immediate ground path. I added the image from the NOLS article that illustrates this.
Sep
9
revised Alternatives to retreating quickly when caught in a lightning storm when rock climbing?
added 207 characters in body
Sep
9
comment Alternatives to retreating quickly when caught in a lightning storm when rock climbing?
Specifically, the charges involved with lightning are so large that current can flow through material that would otherwise be considered an insulator. Have a look through en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dielectric_strength for some more details on this process.
Sep
9
comment Alternatives to retreating quickly when caught in a lightning storm when rock climbing?
@BenCrowell depending on how wet the pack is, it could go either way in terms of affecting the potential difference you offer the current on the ground. There would also likely be metal objects in the pack which would heat up if current ran through them, leading to burns or a fire.
Sep
8
revised Alternatives to retreating quickly when caught in a lightning storm when rock climbing?
minor typos
Sep
8
answered Alternatives to retreating quickly when caught in a lightning storm when rock climbing?
Sep
7
comment Alternatives to retreating quickly when caught in a lightning storm when rock climbing?
This one is really tough. A wet rope is an excellent conductor and extremely risky to be tied into during a thunderstorm. Lightning also travels down crack systems (apparently), and if you crouch under a roof or small overhang, the bolt can jump through you to the ground below... The other aspect is that by the time you feel you're in a thunderstorm you've already been exposed to lightning risk for a significant amount of time (lightning travels far), so you're already reacting later than ideal.
Sep
7
comment Splitting up weight hiking as a couple/mixed gender group
+1 for knowing your own personal weight carrying capacity. An additional useful thing to do with new hikers is to try and always keep a healthy ratio of experience-to-inexperience and likewise high-output-to-low-output, so that you have enough wiggle room within your group to optimize the individual conditions in the case of an emergency or to help a weak member make it through without abandoning the trip objective.
Sep
7
comment How safe is it to hike alone?
@DonBranson I think this would be very regionally dependent, actually. But I agree the overall, as you reduce the size of the population, the probability that an arbitrary member chosen at random poses a risk to you should decrease (to a non-zero minimum). But it doesn't account for how remoteness affects this, and what happens when you come across a problem group rather than just one individual? (E.g. are you safe enough hiking in a group of 3, if you encounter a problem group of 10?)
Aug
31
answered What are the suitable choices of crampons for Scarpa Charmoz GTX Women boots?
Aug
24
comment How to prepare for and survive wildfire?
I would start by thinking of the different risks a wild fire poses, then on how I might mitigate them. E.g.: burning, heat exposure, smoke inhalation, damage to survival critical gear, etc..
Aug
18
answered Which layer should have a hood (for rainy conditions)?
Jul
22
comment Why do many climbers appear to not trust their belay loops?
@crasic the belay loop actually eliminates one important factor: cross-loading on your belay carabiner. (And yes, most "fat" biners` cross-load rating is actually still greater than the maximum impact force of a big fall, but not by much, and certainly not by a factor of 2, like the spine rating.) I think most modern belay-loop-less climbers are mostly coming from the world of alpine climbing and glacier harnesses, where cutting weight is more important.
Jul
20
comment What to teach someone who wants to start lead climbing?
Either way, these are very good points. +1.