926 reputation
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bio website
location Vancouver, Canada
age
visits member for 1 year, 4 months
seen Mar 20 at 7:02

I grew up savage and wild, riding dinosaurs and taming sharks.

Okay, I may have exaggerated just a little. I grew up in a kibbutz in the north of Israel, and spent the majority of my childhood playing outside. Really outside, as in creeks, rivers, canyons, mountains, forests and the like. I moved to Vancouver, BC Canada in late 2005, and discovered that most of my outdoors skills and training did not translate very well. The predators are bigger (and actually lethal,) and the need for water was replaced with the need for warmth and the ability to melt snow for water. The snow, cold, and an abundance of wetness were also quite new... This was a bit of a challenge. A lot of new things to learn and old skills to adapt. But eventually I learned the ways of the frigid north (okay, "the wet north," but that didn't sound as epic, did it?)

I have become a fan of the BC backcountry, with its beautiful and secluded mountains, glaciers, alpine meadows and crystal clear lakes. I have picked up rock climbing, mountaineering, ski touring and mountaineering, and ice climbing. These days I generally strive to spend at least half of my weekends in a year away from civilization.


Jun
21
comment What should I do for a dislocated shoulder?
By the way, for anyone who spends a good amount of time in the wilderness, I highly recommend taking an advanced (50+ hours) wilderness first aid course if you can afford the time. It's not just your life, but everyone around you, and you can't expect them to know these things but not yourself... (And you want to be able to expect it of them!)
Jun
21
comment What should I do for a dislocated shoulder?
@DonBranson youtube.com/watch?v=mFKgVZjJDuo
May
1
comment What is the correct way to attach an autoblock to your harness for rappelling?
"they can get caught in it, and jam the rappel system" More often than not, I find most belay devices to be "prussik minding." That is, they will push the prussik down the rope and prevent it from locking, which is even worse than jamming in that situation, I think.
Apr
26
comment Selecting backpacking cooking pot – teflon, aluminum, steel, titanium, or cast iron?
You need to use more fat in your backcountry cooking; it adds flavour and makes it unsticky, plus most of us need the extra calories up on the mountains :)
Apr
24
answered Comfy inflatable pillows for car camping
Apr
24
comment Comfy inflatable pillows for car camping
I prefer the fleece rolled around the down jacket myself. The down jacket has a nylon surface which is less pleasant to have in contact with your face than the inner side of a good fleece.
Apr
15
comment What to teach someone who wants to start lead climbing?
@DavidR followed by being rescued by the local SAR (loss for the community, but practice for SAR), after which they abandon the sport, sell their rack for a quarter of the price (profit for the community?), and never try it again...
Apr
13
comment What to teach someone who wants to start lead climbing?
Good question. Worth making into a community wiki?
Apr
13
revised What to teach someone who wants to start lead climbing?
added 862 characters in body
Apr
13
answered What to teach someone who wants to start lead climbing?
Apr
1
awarded  Enlightened
Mar
14
comment Rapid backpack readying
@Vorac it's actually not a bad idea to have a survival kit on day hikes as well. When you're going on overnight trips you're essentially already prepared for the overnight, but when you go on a day trip, you have none of that gear with you, so having something like a space blanket and a light tarp could make a huge difference in an overnight-inducing emergency.
Mar
13
answered Rapid backpack readying
Mar
4
comment Bear spray vs. rifles against polar bears?
Personally, I believe the statistics that say a bear spray is actually more effective than a rifle, so I will go for bear spray in a close encounter, and a noise flare in a distant encounter (e.g. scare a bear away from destroying your camp and gear, once you got some distance between it and yourself.) I don't wish to carry the weight of a rifle large enough to be effective against a bear, nor have to go through the regulatory hoops of owning one, but that's a personal preference.
Mar
4
comment Bear spray vs. rifles against polar bears?
@zoul that's assuming you're successful at stopping the bear with the gun... which is not an obvious outcome.
Mar
3
comment Bear spray vs. rifles against polar bears?
@DonBranson I've seen them sold as Bear Bangers, but I'm not sure if that's an official name. In Canada, MEC carries these, for example mec.ca/AST/ShopMEC/HikingCamping/HealthSafety/PRD~4007-144/…
Mar
3
comment Bear spray vs. rifles against polar bears?
@DonBranson That is certainly possible. But then there are better options than firearms for noise alone, such as noise flares, which are both lighter to carry, and easier to transport and purchase due to looser regulatory limitations.
Mar
3
revised Bear spray vs. rifles against polar bears?
duplicate citation
Mar
2
answered Bear spray vs. rifles against polar bears?
Feb
16
awarded  Citizen Patrol