Reputation
3,960
Top tag
Next privilege 4,000 Rep.
Access 'trusted user' tools
Badges
9 38
Newest
 Enlightened
Impact
~24k people reached

2d
awarded  Enlightened
2d
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
2
comment How do I self-assess my physical condition after a fall in the backcountry?
SOLO WFA, SOLO WFR. NOLS WMI is the other main provider for these courses, and has numerous courses offered throughout Washington in the next year, NOLS WFA and NOLS WFR. The courses are taught slightly differently but cover the same material.
Jul
2
comment How do I self-assess my physical condition after a fall in the backcountry?
@ZachL sounds good! And yes, I looked at your pre-edit question (after writing the answer) and it sounds like you were pretty much doing the right thing. If you're interested in taking a course, it looks from your profile like you're in Washington. Both Wilderness First Aid (a 20 hour, typically 2-day course) and Wilderness First Responder (an 80 hour, typically 7-day course) are offered by various organizations in Washington. I took both WFA and WFR through SOLO which appears to have courses for both offered in the puget sound area in July/August.
Jul
2
comment How do I self-assess my physical condition after a fall in the backcountry?
@Liam again, I disagree. Time is of the essence. Actions taken in the first 5 minutes after an injury significantly affect patient outcomes, whereas arrival of professional medical help, let alone evacuation, is almost guaranteed to take hours if not days. Most severe bleeding can be stopped with direct pressure, but that only helps if you know where the bleeding is and that you need to stop it. The whole purpose of the primary survey is to identify and treat major problems quickly. While it's long written out, it only takes a minute to do a blood sweep and chunk check on yourself.
Jul
2
comment How do I self-assess my physical condition after a fall in the backcountry?
@Liam "if it hurts it's injured, if it doesn't it's not" -- I strongly disagree. When you're pumped up on adrenaline and have one big distracting injury, it's easy to overlook other less-obvious but still serious injuries. There's a formal system for assessing injuries in a wilderness setting, and while designed for treating other people, it can be applied to self-assessment as well. I believe thoroughly following the patient assessment system is far more likely to turn up issues which may be overlooked otherwise, especially by a disoriented person immediately after a fall.
Jul
2
answered How do I self-assess my physical condition after a fall in the backcountry?
Jun
29
comment Opening a beer bottle using a mountaineering ice ax
@BenediktBauer while there are some people who do things like that (Boy Scouts come to mind), that is far from typical behavior for American alpinists. Especially in more remote areas LNT practices are typically followed pretty well, and weapons aren't even allowed in national parks. However it's sadly true that in more declined and accessible camping areas you often see absurd and dangerous levels of alcohol consumption.
Jun
19
comment Back country solution to itchy insect bites
This is the most practical answer IMO. Even if natural antihistamines are available, it takes time to find them and apply them, and you may get quite dirty in the process. Appropriate medication us easy to carry and practically guaranteed to be effective. Benadryl or similar should be in any first aid kit anyways in case of insect stings.
Jun
15
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
11
asked How does one choose the right standup paddle board size?
Jun
11
answered How to clean cookware?
Jun
11
comment Dangers of excavating caves?
I don't have the caving expertise to answer this, but I would say that Leave No Trace principles should be carefully considered before doing something like excavating a tunnel in a cave. Beyond the ethical considerations, there may be legal implications if it's in a protected area.
Jun
10
awarded  Nice Question
Jun
10
comment Drinking alcohol as the last choice in survival situation
You're supposing an equal probability of each of those outcomes, which isn't going to be the case. This post really doesn't answer the question in a useful way.
Jun
9
comment Drinking alcohol as the last choice in survival situation
@user3147268 this is slightly outside the scope of your question, but honestly it's best not to put yourself in that kind of situation. If you're going partying with friends in the woods, either go exploring, or stay put to enjoy your alcohol if that's what you want to do. Night + alcohol + moving around = setting yourself up for trouble.
Jun
9
comment What is the difference between “dry rope”, “non-dry rope” and “dry core rope”?
@requiem you should post that as an answer, basically explaining that "it depends on the manufacturer". It looks like all of the answers so far have slightly disagreeing definitions, and the real answer is that you really have to look it up for each one.
Jun
9
comment What is the difference between “dry rope”, “non-dry rope” and “dry core rope”?
Your explanation of "dry core" is that only the core is dry treated; imsodin's explanation is that the sheath and core are treated. Could you provide some reference for this? I'm not sure which to believe; either seems plausible. Thanks.
Jun
9
comment What is the difference between “dry rope”, “non-dry rope” and “dry core rope”?
Your explanation of "dry core" is that the sheath and core are dry treated; shemseger's explanation is that only the core is treated. Could you provide some reference for this? I'm not sure which to believe; either seems plausible. Thanks.
Jun
9
comment What sort of rock climbing grade can a goat do?
I don't think this question is as unanswerable as some say... route grading is somewhat subjective but there is an upper limit on what a goat can achieve, and one could grade that route. Therefore, it should be possible (albeit difficult) to determine what the most difficult route is that a goat can climb. Sure, they climb it differently from humans, but that isn't the question.